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Re: [Saskbirds] Re: Migration

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  • Martin Bailey
    ... From: micknsharon To: Sent: Saturday, April 06, 2002 1:16 PM Subject: [Saskbirds] Re: Migration ...
    Message 1 of 16 , Apr 6, 2002
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      ----- Original Message -----
      From: "micknsharon" <micknsharon@...>
      To: <Saskbirds@yahoogroups.com>
      Sent: Saturday, April 06, 2002 1:16 PM
      Subject: [Saskbirds] Re: Migration


      > Moreover, the Migratory traits studied show considerable phenotypical
      > and additive-genetical variability, and therefore have great
      > microevolutionary potential. With regard to the microevolutionary
      > potential, obligate partial migration proved to be particularly
      > instructive."

      I would translate that to mean that birds adjust to what is going on around
      them.

      This afternoon we saw by Weyburn golf course our first Ring-billed Gulls,
      Mallards, a dozen Mountain Bluebirds: 9 males and 3 females hawking from
      fenceposts and onto the ground for what would appear to be non-existent
      bugs. As well, two Meadowlarks, more Juncos and two Broad-winged Hawks.

      Martin and Carol
    • Martin Bailey
      All morning skeens of Canada and Snow geese were flying over Weyburn. As well, there were a group of four, then 24 and 25 Sandhill Cranes. Redpolls swirled up
      Message 2 of 16 , Apr 10, 2002
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        All morning skeens of Canada and Snow geese were flying over Weyburn. As
        well, there were a group of four, then 24 and 25 Sandhill Cranes.

        Redpolls swirled up into the wind and headed out of town.

        Three Red-tailed and two Broad winged hawks circled and soared in a
        northwesterly direction.

        Three Pintails struggled against the wind.

        At Cedoux; two Mourning Doves perched and the Snowy Owls were noted because
        of their absence.

        Martin
      • Martin Bailey
        In Weyburn there are now many more Northern Flickers (yellow-shafted) than what we see normally. Outside of Weyburn a gathering of Western Meadowlarks. A
        Message 3 of 16 , Sep 19, 2002
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          In Weyburn there are now many more Northern Flickers (yellow-shafted) than
          what we see normally. Outside of Weyburn a gathering of Western
          Meadowlarks.

          A small (probably first year) Kestral has been unsuccessfully chasing
          everything. On the other hand, a mature Prairie Falcon is staying in the
          vicinity of an elevator taking advantage of the pigeons who leave the
          communal roost.

          Martin
        • Harv Lane
          Howdy folks, I went out for a hike along the river just north of Rosthern yesterday and during the day I encountered huge flocks (1000 s) of Snow and Canada
          Message 4 of 16 , Oct 6, 2002
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            Howdy folks,
             
            I went out for a hike along the river just north of Rosthern yesterday and during the day I encountered huge flocks (1000's) of Snow and Canada geese.  There were masses of Juncos moving and I also managed to get a good look a Tree Sparrow heading south.  Vesper Sparrows seemed to be gathering into fairly good sized groups of a dozen or so.  I also had brief encounters with Song and Swamp Sparrows.  On the way home we had a rather nice look at a Sharp-shinned Hawk (little male) sitting on a fence post where he remained until we drove away.
             
            In my yard the action continues hot and heavy.  I now have several Fox Sparrows and White-crowned juveniles have arrived.  Both yesterday and this morning I have finally had a Goldfinch in the yard.   By this time of year both Goldfinches and Pine Siskins should be emptying my niger feeder daily but this is the first of either species this fall and it hasn't even found that feeder.  A Palm Warbler was making a rather quiet inspection of my lawn this morning while the sparrows were causing a great commotion under all the feeders  and in the garden.
             
            Hope the Riders have a little something in them for today.  (Plenty of disrespect intended for our Manitoba readers ... I'll eat crow later if I have to!)
             
            Cheers,
            Harv
            Saskatoon
          • el_supremo01
            ... the yard. By this time of year both Goldfinches and Pine Siskins should be emptying my niger feeder daily but this is the first of either species this
            Message 5 of 16 , Oct 8, 2002
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              --- In Saskbirds@y..., Harv Lane <hdlane@s...> wrote:
              > Both yesterday and this morning I have finally had a Goldfinch in
              the yard. By this time of year both Goldfinches and Pine Siskins
              should be emptying my niger feeder daily but this is the first of
              either species this fall and it hasn't even found that feeder.

              Hi Harv and All,
              There was a Pine Siskin in my yard a few times today (Tues 8th).
              Several house finches also showed up through the day. I haven't seen
              any goldfinches for quite a long time and my freshly filled niger
              feeder hasn't attracted any birds yet. They seem to be content to
              feed on whatever they find on the ground.

              Best Wishes
            • Martin Bailey
              A territorial Merlin attacked a Cooper s Hawk on its way through Weyburn at about 7:15 in the morning yesterday. The Cooper s was one of three seen in the
              Message 6 of 16 , Apr 8, 2003
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                A territorial Merlin attacked a Cooper's Hawk on its way through Weyburn at
                about 7:15 in the morning yesterday. The Cooper's was one of three seen in
                the Weyburn area yesterday. Not seen, but heard overhead, were Sandhill
                Cranes.

                It was a hawk day. Red-tailed Hawks were noted all day including a black
                and white one, which while probably a Harlin's, could have been a
                Rough-legged Hawk. (The dark phase Rough-legged has a wide tail band
                ventrally.)

                Thousands of Snow Geese are still in the area. And, yes, they were flying
                south - from a dam outside of Weyburn to fields for a day of foraging.

                One mature Bald Eagle lumbered northward. But it appeared smaller in size
                than "the condor" perched on a farm building. The first Turkey Vulture seen
                this year in the Weyburn area.

                There were flocks of up to ten Western Meadow Larks by the roads and single
                Mourning Doves were spotted in windbreaks as well as Tree Sparrows.

                The only ducks noted yesterday were Mallards.

                Martin, Carol and Johnnie
              • Bailey and Bjorklund
                In the middle of the night - last night - Carol heard Upland Sandpipers calling. It is amazing that many birds that are active during the day migrate at night.
                Message 7 of 16 , Aug 10, 2004
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                  In the middle of the night - last night - Carol heard Upland Sandpipers
                  calling.
                  It is amazing that many birds that are active during the day migrate at
                  night.
                  Studies seem to indicate that during migration some birds go without sleep
                  for days
                  without any change in their ability to cope. They do not suffer sleep
                  deprivation.

                  Martin
                • Greg
                  Hello all. I have a question for everyone out there concerning some of our more common feathered friends. Re: American Robin, Blackbirds (variety), all finch
                  Message 8 of 16 , Sep 24, 2004
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                    Hello all.

                    I have a question for everyone out there concerning some of our more
                    common feathered friends. Re: American Robin, Blackbirds (variety),
                    all finch species, warblers, sparrow species, shorebirds, and any
                    other observations you may have. What I am interested in is migration
                    timing (early, late on time for your areas) numbers (up, down,
                    unchanged), activity at feeders and who is still here. Are there any
                    species that you have not seen yet that you usually see? There has
                    been sporatic mention of shorebird activity; duck, geese etc are just
                    starting but does anyone see any unusual patterns developing?

                    and any other tidbits that you may wnat to share

                    a sidebar great picture of the Egret WOW, and those Hawk numbers, a
                    little slice of natures wonder.

                    thank you

                    Greg
                  • Bailey and Bjorklund
                    A quick way to get a broadbrush view of the birds that stay and those that leave in the winter, and where birds spend their time over the year, is to look at
                    Message 9 of 16 , Nov 1, 2004
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                      A quick way to get a broadbrush view of the birds that stay and those that
                      leave in the winter, and where birds spend their time over the year, is to
                      look at the range maps in your bird book.
                    • Greg
                      I kow it is late, but we are cleaning the basement. I made some trips to the trash, and could not help but notice that there were a great many shorebirds
                      Message 10 of 16 , May 29 12:08 AM
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                        I kow it is late, but we are cleaning the basement. I made some trips
                        to the trash, and could not help but notice that there were a great
                        many shorebirds peeping overhead. There was a steady stream of birds
                        from about 11pm, and they are still flying overhead at 1am.

                        Greg
                      • Gordon A. Taylor
                        The warbler/Vireo migration is certainly in full swing. I am leaving the fountain running over night in our pond. Last week we had visits from Yellow-rumped,
                        Message 11 of 16 , Aug 20, 2006
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                          The warbler/Vireo migration is certainly in full swing. I am leaving the fountain running over night in our pond. Last week we had visits from Yellow-rumped, Yellow, Black-polled,Orange-crowned, Palm, Tennessee, Blackburnian, Northern Waterthrush and Wilson's Warblers. The two Vireo's were the Philadelphia and the Warbling.

                          Today Reta and I drove down to the Last Mountain Lake Wildlife and found the water filled with virtually every species of duck. The Sandhill Cranes were talking from high overhead then spiralling down out of their thermals to greet those already feeding or sleeping. There are probably five hundred there now.

                          We spotted one Great Egret hunting at the south end of the drive around the lake section. Pelican and Double Crested Cormorants were both present but in smaller numbers tha in our July visit.

                          There were several Swainson's Hawks present along with a couple of Red-tailed Hawks and many Northern Harriers. We spotted one Broad-winged Hawk riding a thermal southward alongside a light phase Red-tailed.

                          Barn Swallows and Tree Swallows were still present in good numbers but the Purple Martins were absent.

                          Ross Dixon of the CWF was mist-netting and banding in the shelter belts when we arrived and he most courteyesly gave us a tour.He showed us a Mourning Dove's nest with the mother and two young still in the nest.

                          Good birding to all

                          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                        • Val
                          We ve had a gathering of a dozen Yellow-shafted Northern Flickers at the farm this past week along with 20 or so American Robins. A Yellow-rumped Warbler is
                          Message 12 of 16 , Sep 14, 2007
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                            We've had a gathering of a dozen Yellow-shafted Northern Flickers at
                            the farm this past week along with 20 or so American Robins. A
                            Yellow-rumped Warbler is still drinking from the oriole feeder and
                            the Downy Woodpecker is as well. The warbler is quite tame when
                            we're watching it. White-crowned Sparrows have now appeared. We
                            still have lots of Mourning Doves but they'll be surprised at their
                            bird-bath drink this morning...need a chissel on the ice. We've seen
                            Palm Warblers and others that we can't ID.

                            We've been up and gone by 7:00 a.m. to daily babysit in Regina a few
                            days this week so garden chores were done around 5:30 a.m. three
                            days ago. The Rock Pigeons were out and about at that early time.
                            You did wait for a chilly garden gathering Guy!! :-)

                            The Swainson's Hawk data from Jared was really interesting as Elma
                            McCormick phoned the other day that she saw a Swainson's Hawk on the
                            street along Railway Avenue in Weyburn. A guy was approaching it so
                            she stopped to see what was going on. Then another van stopped. When
                            the guy got quite close the hawk flew up onto the van roof.
                            Meanwhile the conservation officer had been phoned and came along
                            and took the Swainson's. At this time I'd like to thank Jared for
                            making our summer so especially interesting with his e-mails and
                            Sanders updates and all the belly laughs. Just like when Jim reports
                            on your experiences together, total fun. We appreciated you from the
                            first time you enthusiastically came to our place. I remember Bob
                            gave us a good report on you. You have so many dedicated friends and
                            we know you have a lot of background support from those who work or
                            bird with you..we enjoyed your co-announcing on birdline!! There are
                            many special people on this birding forum who modestly go about
                            doing their thing. We are thankful for the younger people who are so
                            involved to carry on. We really enjoy taking part or hearing about
                            what goes on from all of you. We look forward to the postings of all
                            the great photos and stories of outings and backyard sightings from
                            everyone. We enjoy all the friendships garnished through bird
                            watching. Just felt a little blubbery this morning.

                            So, we still have a Rough-legged Hawk in the area but yesterday
                            was 'cool' with four Swainson's Hawks sitting on the fence posts
                            that surround the open-pit nuisance ground just down the road from
                            our place. A Merlin hangs around the yard. Our Bohemian Waxwing
                            really jumps in alarm about his cage at times and we're thinking
                            it's because a hawk or the merlin has gone by. By the way, he has
                            now become a connoisseur of almost every type of food....whatever is
                            on our plate he'll run over, take a piece off and devour it but
                            blueberries, bananas and orange slices are his mainstay.

                            Enough....heading in to work.

                            Val T - McTaggart
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