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Re: [Saskbirds] Regina Sightings

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  • tsb2001
    Dan I know we all love to read about sightings no matter which birds are involved. I suspect that most people would be very pleased to see Gyrfalcon. I
    Message 1 of 1 , Feb 10 3:44 PM
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      Dan
      I know we all love to read about sightings no matter which birds are
      involved. I suspect that most people would be very pleased to see
      Gyrfalcon. I suspect that we never get tired or bored with reading about any
      sightings. Reading about these inspires us all to get out and see more birds
      plus simultaneously provides data for the various reports.

      The March North American Bird Report will cover the months of Nov.-Feb.,
      inclusive. I will just add the data from sightings this month to the
      previous information already collected for the first two months. The
      deadline for forwarding sightings will be the last Wednesday of this month.

      Today, Fred Lahrman reports a single A.Crow flying over Broad Street and
      Broadway. This is a considerable distance from the two crows wintering near
      Dewdney and York Street in Western Regina and may represent a third
      wintering bird. Cedar Waxwings are missing from their previous Regina areas
      since the cold last two weeks in January. !? Also, Bohemian Waxwings seem
      absent from the City this Winter !? White-winged Crossbills are also much
      reduced ,lately.

      The female Red-bellied Woodpecker is still being seen regularly just after
      lunch in Douglas Park near the 20th Ave. entrance.

      I have recently seen the male Varied Thrush on the back fence of the corner
      house on 19th and Retallack Street. The best time to see it seems to be
      between 10:00 and 11:00 each day. It arrives from an unknown destination to
      the northeast. The large garage on the alley blocks views until it appears
      on the fence. The owner of the yard ,with the feeders, says that it usually
      visit three times each day. It is eating ground peanuts plus scavenging
      under several feeders on the back yard fence. The best way to see this bird
      is to remain in your parked car on Retallack opposite the alley between 19th
      and Leopold Crescent. The bird usually perches on the fence as it flies in
      and out of the yard. It spooks easily and simply disappears within nearby
      spruce ,cedars and junipers. If you are in the alley it simply doesn't
      appear. I have been unable to find it when I use that strategy.

      The American Goldfinch is travelling with Pine Siskins within the Douglas
      Park area. Recently larger numbers of Common Redpolls are joining this mixed
      group. Each day , I see varying numbers of Dark-eyed Junco's in both the Old
      Lakeview and Douglas Park areas. A single flock of 34+ House Finches was
      perched together in a large ash tree in Tom Riffel's back yard. Included
      within this group were three orange variant males.

      Take care
      Bob Luterbach




      Good Birding !

      Take care
      Bob Luterbach
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