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Lapland Longspur Wintering Range

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  • Bob
    Although this species does straggler into Arizona, the main aspect of its range is in a broad arc /band across the US which ranges to the Canadian border in
    Message 1 of 2 , Feb 1, 2004
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      Although this species does straggler into Arizona, the main aspect of its
      range is in a broad arc /band across the US which ranges to the Canadian
      border in the west ,dips within the central area to the Gulf Coast, and
      approaches the southern tip of Ontario.

      The maps suggest that these are found throughout the Rocky Mountains. This
      seems unlikely. Perhaps they occur within some of the valleys. Perhaps the
      key factor may the typical amount of snow cover and the typical seasonal
      temperatures, with them moving farther south during intervals and years such
      as this one.

      Several years ago, I saw large numbers of Lapland's in mid-winter at the
      Poplar Creek Hydro Reservoir near Coronach. And they are reported at
      Bromhead and have been seen at Regina during CBC's. I believe they are more
      regular in winter in the southwest of the Province which typically features
      milder temps and less snow cover.

      Good Birding
      Bob L.
    • Martin Bailey
      ... more ... features ... Our experience ( Carol and I) on the Bromhead CBC is that we see Lapland Longspurs where there was little if no snow cover. Where it
      Message 2 of 2 , Feb 1, 2004
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        > Several years ago, I saw large numbers of Lapland's in mid-winter at the
        > Poplar Creek Hydro Reservoir near Coronach. And they are reported at
        > Bromhead and have been seen at Regina during CBC's. I believe they are
        more
        > regular in winter in the southwest of the Province which typically
        features
        > milder temps and less snow cover.


        Our experience ( Carol and I) on the Bromhead CBC is that we see Lapland
        Longspurs where there was little if no snow cover. Where it was easy for
        LALO to forage and find seeds would be where we found flocks of them. Air
        temperature did not matter. Or if it did, it would be a question of LALO
        more likely staying together as the temperature dropped - a not uncommon
        occurrence with other birds and animals as the weather gets more severe.

        This is not to say that milder temperatures - chinooks and the like, do not
        play their part. But that would be because there would be more snow melt as
        the temperature rises exposuring seed and soil.

        Martin
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