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Last Mountain Lake

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  • Harv Lane
    All! No Slaty-backed Gull today on Fox Point (Spit)near Colesdale Park Resort. Instead ,there were 6 Herring Gulls,mostly adults plus at least two 1st fall
    Message 1 of 20 , Nov 16, 2000
      All!

      No Slaty-backed Gull today on Fox Point (Spit)near Colesdale Park
      Resort.
      Instead ,there were 6 Herring Gulls,mostly adults plus at least two 1st

      fall birds, either on the Spit or 5 kms away perched on the ice just
      north
      of Rowan's Ravine. I searched this general area for only two hours prior
      to
      returning south to Glen Harbour Resort and then home.

      A 1st fall Long-tailed Duck was in a small opening in the ice near Glen
      Harbour Resort. Also, present in this general area ,with the rapidly
      diminishing numbers of Common Goldeneyes, were two Common Mergansers,a
      Red-breasted Merganser (probably an eclipse male)a single Western
      Grebe,several Mallards, two Tundra Swans and perhaps a hundred Canada
      Geese.Also there were several Lesser Scaup and a male Gadwall. Two very
      vocal Ravens were soaring near the lakeside cliffs at Glen Harbour.
      Another
      was flying at roadside near Silton.

      Raptors for the day include a typical adult Western Red-tailed Hawk this

      morning near the Highway Dept. Scales on Highway # 11 just past Ipsco.
      One
      or two adult Bald Eagles were seen. One was perched at Rowan's Ravine
      Provincial Park: another!? or the same bird was later seen flying south
      past
      Glen Harbour.

      Take care
      Bob
    • robert wapple
      Hello spring birdwatchers, Al Smith and myself began the 11th season of songbird migration monitoring at Last Mountain Bird Observatory (LMBO) on Wednesday,
      Message 2 of 20 , May 14, 2001
        Hello spring birdwatchers,
        Al Smith and myself began the 11th season of songbird migration
        monitoring at Last Mountain Bird Observatory (LMBO) on Wednesday, May 9.
        We had one of the best opening days ever due to very strong winds that
        appeared to halt a fairly strong movement of spring migrants. More on
        this later. Firstly, we would like to encourage everyone to come and
        visit LMBO. It is truly one of the best places anywhere to watch birds.
        Our songbird banding station is the only such facility in Saskatchewan
        and one of the few nationwide that is open to the public. We will be
        open every day the weather allows until 31 May, from 7 a.m. until 1
        p.m.. The peak of daily banding activity is usually between 0930 and
        1130, and the best period to visit is from 15-25 May, so if you are
        planning a visit you may want to time your stop accordingly.
        As well attracting phenomenal numbers of migrating songbirds, the
        regional park allows excellent viewing of water-associated birds from
        the lakeshore and the extensive marshes at the north end of the lake are
        only a short drive away. If there is anyone who would like to receive a
        copy of our latest newsletter or would like more information about LMBO,
        drop me a note.
        As I mentioned earlier, 9 May was a very windy day and nearly prevented
        us from opening our mist nets but we persevered and captured over 50
        birds, which is considered a very productive day by spring standards
        (the fall is much more productive as far as the number of birds banded
        is concerned).
        Luckily, the wind dissipated as the day wore on and by mid-afternoon it
        was a beautiful calm spring day and I continued birdwatching for much of
        the rest of the day. The regional park was alive with migrants and
        everywhere you looked there were hungry songbirds taking advantage of
        the fine foraging conditions. There was in the neighborhood of 250
        Yellow-rumped Warblers. They were everywhere you looked and dozens of
        males were constantly singing. One of the highlights of the day was
        catching and banding of a male ‘Audubon’s’ Warbler. We have had a few of
        these in the past but it’s been six or seven years since our last record
        and I don’t think we’ve ever had one in the spring.
        Another highlight was the presence of a Snowy Egret in a marsh along the
        lakeshore north of the public beach. The bird was very skittish and did
        not allow close approach. Just after it was located, it flew across the
        lake and landed on Bird Island but returned later on in the day and was
        last seen just before dark. The north end of the lake is one of the best
        places in the province to find this rare species but I believe this is
        the first occurrence within the regional park. Late migrants seen from
        shore included a Common Loon and a Red-breasted Merganser.
        Driving around the north end of the lake, the usual myriad of waterfowl
        and marsh birds were noted, although the lake level is considerably
        lower this spring and many of the marshes are quite dry. At sunset, I
        was able to watch two bitterns sitting up high in the bulrushes, a
        couple of hundred meters apart, giving their pumping calls. Many others
        were also heard but these were the only ones I was able to see. To
        witness this unusual vocal display is quite a sight.
        Shorebirds were scarce and most have yet to arrive, with only a few
        Greater and Lesser Yellowlegs and a flock of about 20 Long-billed
        Dowitchers seen. Staying later than usual were 6 Tundra Swans and 3
        Greater White-fronted Geese. Incubating Ferruginous and Swainson’s Hawks
        were also noted.
        Other new spring arrivals noted during the day included Pied-billed
        Grebe, Sora, Virginia Rail, Least Flycatcher, Brown Thrasher, Swainson’s
        Thrush (20), Gray-cheeked Thrush (2), White-winged Scoter, Bank Swallow,
        House Wren, Loggerhead Shrike, Yellow Warbler, Blackpoll Warbler,
        Northern Waterthrush, Ruby-crowned Kinglet, American Goldfinch,
        Rose-breasted Grosbeak, Le Conte’s, Lincoln’s, White-crowned, and
        White-throated Sparrows.
        At the end of the day I had seen 102 species, which is remarkable since
        only a moderate effort was put forward! The perfect migrating conditions
        of the following night must have beckoned these northbound birds to move
        on and the following day, very few of these birds remained (less than 10
        birds were captured for banding!), although a Yellow-bellied Sapsucker
        and a Harris’ Sparrow were noted.
        The combination of resident bird species that breed in the extensive
        wetlands at the north end of this lake and the enormous numbers of
        migrant shorebirds and songbirds that this region attracts make it one
        of the premiere birding spots in all of North America. Hopefully at
        least some of you can get out and witness it for yourselves,

        Robert Wapple
      • Harris, Wayne ERM
        I had the chance to spend Wednesday evening at Last Mountain Lake National Wildlife Area. Water was very low with most of the marsh and shorebird areas
        Message 3 of 20 , May 17, 2002
          I had the chance to spend Wednesday evening at Last Mountain Lake National Wildlife Area.  Water was very low with most of the marsh and shorebird areas completely dry, hence both water and shorebirds were scarce.  There were however 100's of Savannah Sparrows and the first (for me) Baird's and LeConte's Sparrows and American Bittern.  After sunset the fens and marshes associated with Peter Lake had calling Marsh and Sedge Wrens, Yellow Rail  and Nelson's Sharp-tailed Sparrow
           

          Wayne Harris
          Saskatchewan Environment and Resource Management
          Box 5000, 350 Cheadle Street West
          Swift Current, Saskatchewan  S9H 4G3

          Phone: 306-778-8218
          Fax: 306-778-8212
          Email: wharris@...


          -----Original Message-----
          From: Harv Lane [mailto:hdlane@...]
          Sent: May 13, 2002 11:27 PM
          To: Saskbirds@yahoogroups.com
          Cc: SurreyBirders@yahoogroups.com
          Subject: [Saskbirds] 2002 Saskbirds List

          Hi folks,
           
          Well the shorebirds are starting to pour in.  I took a ride this afternoon with Peter Harde to some of the sloughs that I've always used for shorebirding .... unfortunately they were all completely dry.  Any place where there is water should be good this spring!!!  With other reports that I've received over the last couple of days our list has jumped to 211 species.  We should be getting a number of new warbler sighting soon and the last few shorebirds should be making their appearance any day now.
           
          Cheers,
          Harv

          Saskatchewan 2002 Bird List

          1. Common Loon (Great Northern Diver)
          2. Pied-billed Grebe
          3. Red-necked Grebe
          4. Horned Grebe (Slavonian Grebe)
          5. Eared Grebe (Black-necked Grebe)
          6. Western Grebe
          7. Clark's Grebe
          8. American White Pelican
          9. Double-crested Cormorant
          10. Great Blue Heron
          11. Black-crowned Night-Heron
          12. Tundra Swan
          13. Greater White-fronted Goose
          14. Snow Goose
          15. Ross's Goose
          16. Canada Goose
          17. Wood Duck
          18. American Wigeon
          19. Gadwall
          20. Green-winged Teal
          21. Mallard
          22. American Black Duck
          23. Northern Pintail
          24. Blue-winged Teal
          25. Cinnamon Teal
          26. Northern Shoveler
          27. Canvasback
          28. Redhead
          29. Ring-necked Duck
          30. Greater Scaup
          31. Lesser Scaup
          32. Common Goldeneye (Goldeneye)
          33. Bufflehead
          34. Hooded Merganser
          35. Red-breasted Merganser
          36. Common Merganser (Goosander)
          37. Ruddy Duck
          38. Turkey Vulture
          39. Osprey
          40. Bald Eagle
          41. Northern Harrier
          42. Sharp-shinned Hawk
          43. Cooper's Hawk
          44. Northern Goshawk
          45. Broad-winged Hawk
          46. Swainson's Hawk
          47. Red-tailed Hawk
          48. Ferruginous Hawk
          49. Rough-legged Hawk (Rough-legged Buzzard)
          50. Golden Eagle
          51. American Kestrel
          52. Merlin
          53. Gyrfalcon
          54. Prairie Falcon
          55. Peregrine Falcon
          56. Spruce Grouse
          57. Willow Ptarmigan (Red Grouse)
          58. Ruffed Grouse
          59. Greater Sage-Grouse
          60. Sharp-tailed Grouse
          61. Gray Partridge (Grey Partridge)
          62. Ring-necked Pheasant (Pheasant)
          63. Sandhill Crane
          64. Whooping Crane
          65. Sora
          66. American Coot
          67. Black-necked Stilt
          68. American Avocet
          69. American Golden-Plover
          70. Black-bellied Plover (Grey Plover)
          71. Semipalmated Plover
          72. Killdeer
          73. Piping Plover
          74. Common Snipe
          75. Short-billed Dowitcher
          76. Long-billed Dowitcher
          77. Hudsonian Godwit
          78. Marbled Godwit
          79. Long-billed Curlew
          80. Greater Yellowlegs
          81. Lesser Yellowlegs
          82. Solitary Sandpiper
          83. Spotted Sandpiper
          84. Willet
          85. Red Knot
          86. Sanderling
          87. Semipalmated Sandpiper
          88. Least Sandpiper
          89. Baird's Sandpiper
          90. Pectoral Sandpiper
          91. Stilt Sandpiper
          92. Wilson's Phalarope
          93. Ring-billed Gull
          94. California Gull
          95. Glaucous Gull
          96. Iceland Gull
          97. Herring Gull
          98. Bonaparte's Gull
          99. Franklin's Gull
          100. Common Tern
          101. Forster's Tern
          102. Rock Dove
          103. Eurasian Collared-Dove (Collared Dove)
          104. Mourning Dove
          105. Great Horned Owl
          106. Snowy Owl
          107. Great Gray Owl
          108. Northern Hawk Owl
          109. Burrowing Owl
          110. Boreal Owl
          111. Northern Saw-whet Owl
          112. Long-eared Owl
          113. Short-eared Owl
          114. Ruby-throated Hummingbird
          115. Belted Kingfisher
          116. Red-bellied Woodpecker
          117. Yellow-bellied Sapsucker
          118. Downy Woodpecker
          119. Hairy Woodpecker
          120. Three-toed Woodpecker
          121. Black-backed Woodpecker
          122. Northern Flicker
          123. Pileated Woodpecker
          124. Western Kingbird
          125. Eastern Phoebe
          126. Say's Phoebe
          127. Eastern Kingbird
          128. Horned Lark (Shore Lark)
          129. Purple Martin
          130. Tree Swallow
          131. Cliff Swallow
          132. Barn Swallow
          133. American Pipit
          134. Sprague's Pipit
          135. Golden-crowned Kinglet
          136. Ruby-crowned Kinglet
          137. Bohemian Waxwing
          138. Cedar Waxwing
          139. Rock Wren
          140. Gray Catbird
          141. Northern Mockingbird
          142. Brown Thrasher
          143. Eastern Bluebird
          144. Mountain Bluebird
          145. Gray-cheeked Thrush
          146. Swainson's Thrush
          147. Hermit Thrush
          148. American Robin
          149. Varied Thrush
          150. Black-capped Chickadee
          151. Boreal Chickadee
          152. Red-breasted Nuthatch
          153. White-breasted Nuthatch
          154. Brown Creeper
          155. Loggerhead Shrike
          156. Northern Shrike (Great Grey Shrike)
          157. Gray Jay
          158. Blue Jay
          159. Black-billed Magpie
          160. American Crow
          161. Common Raven (Raven)
          162. European Starling (Starling)
          163. Tennessee Warbler
          164. Orange-crowned Warbler
          165. Yellow Warbler
          166. Yellow-rumped Warbler
          167. Palm Warbler
          168. Blackpoll Warbler
          169. Black-and-White Warbler
          170. Northern Waterthrush
          171. Eastern Towhee
          172. Spotted Towhee
          173. American Tree Sparrow
          174. Chipping Sparrow
          175. Clay-coloured Sparrow
          176. Brewer's Sparrow
          177. Versper Sparrow
          178. Lark Sparrow
          179. Savannah Sparrow
          180. Fox Sparrow
          181. Song Sparrow
          182. Lincoln's Sparrow
          183. White-crowned Sparrow
          184. White-throated Sparrow
          185. Harris' Sparrow
          186. Dark-eyed Junco
          187. McCown's Longspur
          188. Lapland Longspur (Lapland Bunting)
          189. Smith's Longspur
          190. Chestnut-collared Longspur
          191. Snow Bunting
          192. Rose-breasted Grosbeak
          193. Black-headed Grosbeak
          194. Red-winged Blackbird
          195. Western Meadowlark
          196. Yellow-headed Blackbird
          197. Rusty Blackbird
          198. Brewer's Blackbird
          199. Common Grackle
          200. Brown-headed Cowbird
          201. Pine Grosbeak
          202. Purple Finch
          203. House Finch
          204. Red Crossbill (Common Crossbill)
          205. White-winged Crossbill (Two-barred Crossbill)
          206. Common Redpoll
          207. Hoary Redpoll
          208. Pine Siskin
          209. American Goldfinch
          210. Evening Grosbeak
          211. House Sparrow


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        • Donna Cork
          Hi there Ron and I went to LML yesterday and were not disappointed even though we didn t see the Whooping Cranes. The Sandhills are magnificent as well. We
          Message 4 of 20 , Oct 4, 2006
            Hi there
            Ron and I went to LML yesterday and were not disappointed even though we
            didn't see the Whooping Cranes. The Sandhills are magnificent as well.

            We were wondering if anyone else has seen Golden Eagles? I am 99.9% sure
            that is what we saw. There were 2 of them in with a bunch of Ravens and
            they were huge. They did have a very dark underwing with white windows. I
            only got a fleeting look at them as they flew off when we got closer. This
            was on the road from Stalwart to Etters beach.

            While walking on the boardwalk at the National Wildlife Area we flushed an
            American Bittern....3 times in different spots. Don't know if it was the
            same one or not. Also on the same walk a beautiful little Marsh Wren
            flitted around. Across the road from the walk was a common snipe.

            This as well as many of the usuals, it was a great day.

            Noreen and Alan, we found your slough but alas no Whoopers. Great to have
            you on board.

            Donna and Ron
            Moose Jaw



            --
            No virus found in this outgoing message.
            Checked by AVG Free Edition.
            Version: 7.1.407 / Virus Database: 268.12.12/462 - Release Date: 10/3/2006
          • valndoyle
            Doyle and I were at LML also yesterday afternoon! We saw a vehicle parked by the boardwalk and now wish we had taken the walk but we ve done it a few times
            Message 5 of 20 , Oct 4, 2006
              Doyle and I were at LML also yesterday afternoon! We saw a vehicle
              parked by the boardwalk and now wish we had taken the walk but we've
              done it a few times before. We met a vehicle on the path with a
              couple in....was it you?? :-) We also found the slough Noreen and
              Alan mentioned and it had 10 Sandhill Cranes the first time we
              looked but they had moved the second time when we went back to drive
              around the block as the farmers were working in the fields. We saw
              numerous Great-blue Herons at LML plus were fortunate enough to see
              a smaller flock of Sandhill Cranes flying close by with a Whooping
              Crane amongst them. When we left many flocks of Sandhills and Snow
              Geese were flying in. The count of Northern Harriers was over 30 in
              the area. We saw a tree with lots of Common Ravens in it. We were
              heading up to where the Whooping Cranes had been spotted at the lake
              further north but after the Last Mountain Lake stop I got very car
              sick so we headed home. Welcome Noreen and Alan.

              Val and Doyle - McTaggart

              -- In Saskbirds@yahoogroups.com, Donna Cork <donnacork@...> wrote:
              >
              > Hi there
              > Ron and I went to LML yesterday and were not disappointed even
              though we
              > didn't see the Whooping Cranes. The Sandhills are magnificent as
              well.
              >
              > We were wondering if anyone else has seen Golden Eagles? I am
              99.9% sure
              > that is what we saw. There were 2 of them in with a bunch of
              Ravens and
              > they were huge. They did have a very dark underwing with white
              windows. I
              > only got a fleeting look at them as they flew off when we got
              closer. This
              > was on the road from Stalwart to Etters beach.
              >
              > While walking on the boardwalk at the National Wildlife Area we
              flushed an
              > American Bittern....3 times in different spots. Don't know if it
              was the
              > same one or not. Also on the same walk a beautiful little Marsh
              Wren
              > flitted around. Across the road from the walk was a common snipe.
              >
              > This as well as many of the usuals, it was a great day.
              >
              > Noreen and Alan, we found your slough but alas no Whoopers. Great
              to have
              > you on board.
              >
              > Donna and Ron
              > Moose Jaw
              >
              >
              >
              > --
              > No virus found in this outgoing message.
              > Checked by AVG Free Edition.
              > Version: 7.1.407 / Virus Database: 268.12.12/462 - Release Date:
              10/3/2006
              >
            • plantman108
              - Donna and Ron, I was out there Sunday past and saw two birds I reported as Bald Eagles. There was a third bird which I thought was a Golden Eagle which I did
              Message 6 of 20 , Oct 4, 2006
                -
                Donna and Ron,

                I was out there Sunday past and saw two birds I reported as Bald
                Eagles. There was a third bird which I thought was a Golden Eagle
                which I did not report. It was just a little further southeast than
                the first two.

                All three birds seemed to be immatures but there was a fair
                distance between me and the birds.The single one showed a fair
                amount of white on the underwings which added to me leaning to a
                Golden Eagle in that case.

                There were Ravens harrassing all three birds that afternoon.

                Glad you had a good day birding. Cheerio.

                Steven Weir
                Regina,Sk









                -- In Saskbirds@yahoogroups.com, Donna Cork <donnacork@...> wrote:
                >
                > Hi there
                > Ron and I went to LML yesterday and were not disappointed even
                though we
                > didn't see the Whooping Cranes. The Sandhills are magnificent as
                well.
                >
                > We were wondering if anyone else has seen Golden Eagles? I am
                99.9% sure
                > that is what we saw. There were 2 of them in with a bunch of
                Ravens and
                > they were huge. They did have a very dark underwing with white
                windows. I
                > only got a fleeting look at them as they flew off when we got
                closer. This
                > was on the road from Stalwart to Etters beach.
                >
                > While walking on the boardwalk at the National Wildlife Area we
                flushed an
                > American Bittern....3 times in different spots. Don't know if it
                was the
                > same one or not. Also on the same walk a beautiful little Marsh
                Wren
                > flitted around. Across the road from the walk was a common snipe.
                >
                > This as well as many of the usuals, it was a great day.
                >
                > Noreen and Alan, we found your slough but alas no Whoopers. Great
                to have
                > you on board.
                >
                > Donna and Ron
                > Moose Jaw
                >
                >
                >
                > --
                > No virus found in this outgoing message.
                > Checked by AVG Free Edition.
                > Version: 7.1.407 / Virus Database: 268.12.12/462 - Release Date:
                10/3/2006
                >
              • Donna Cork
                Thanks for the encouragement Steven, I really believe they were Goldens. Donna ... From: plantman108 To: Saskbirds@yahoogroups.com Sent: Wednesday, October
                Message 7 of 20 , Oct 4, 2006
                  Thanks for the encouragement Steven, I really believe they were Goldens. Donna
                  ----- Original Message -----
                  From: plantman108
                  To: Saskbirds@yahoogroups.com
                  Sent: Wednesday, October 04, 2006 7:02 PM
                  Subject: [Saskbirds] Re: Last Mountain Lake


                  -
                  Donna and Ron,

                  I was out there Sunday past and saw two birds I reported as Bald
                  Eagles. There was a third bird which I thought was a Golden Eagle
                  which I did not report. It was just a little further southeast than
                  the first two.

                  All three birds seemed to be immatures but there was a fair
                  distance between me and the birds.The single one showed a fair
                  amount of white on the underwings which added to me leaning to a
                  Golden Eagle in that case.

                  There were Ravens harrassing all three birds that afternoon.

                  Glad you had a good day birding. Cheerio.

                  Steven Weir
                  Regina,Sk

                  -- In Saskbirds@yahoogroups.com, Donna Cork <donnacork@...> wrote:
                  >
                  > Hi there
                  > Ron and I went to LML yesterday and were not disappointed even
                  though we
                  > didn't see the Whooping Cranes. The Sandhills are magnificent as
                  well.
                  >
                  > We were wondering if anyone else has seen Golden Eagles? I am
                  99.9% sure
                  > that is what we saw. There were 2 of them in with a bunch of
                  Ravens and
                  > they were huge. They did have a very dark underwing with white
                  windows. I
                  > only got a fleeting look at them as they flew off when we got
                  closer. This
                  > was on the road from Stalwart to Etters beach.
                  >
                  > While walking on the boardwalk at the National Wildlife Area we
                  flushed an
                  > American Bittern....3 times in different spots. Don't know if it
                  was the
                  > same one or not. Also on the same walk a beautiful little Marsh
                  Wren
                  > flitted around. Across the road from the walk was a common snipe.
                  >
                  > This as well as many of the usuals, it was a great day.
                  >
                  > Noreen and Alan, we found your slough but alas no Whoopers. Great
                  to have
                  > you on board.
                  >
                  > Donna and Ron
                  > Moose Jaw
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  > --
                  > No virus found in this outgoing message.
                  > Checked by AVG Free Edition.
                  > Version: 7.1.407 / Virus Database: 268.12.12/462 - Release Date:
                  10/3/2006
                  >






                  ------------------------------------------------------------------------------


                  No virus found in this incoming message.
                  Checked by AVG Free Edition.
                  Version: 7.1.407 / Virus Database: 268.12.12/462 - Release Date: 10/3/2006

                  ----------

                  No virus found in this outgoing message.
                  Checked by AVG Free Edition.
                  Version: 7.1.407 / Virus Database: 268.12.12/462 - Release Date: 10/3/2006


                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                • Val
                  Excellent shots Nick as always and kudos to Rocky and Kaye-Lynn also for a great show. We went to Last Mountain Lake yesterday and really had a good time. This
                  Message 8 of 20 , Sep 5, 2007
                    Excellent shots Nick as always and kudos to Rocky and Kaye-Lynn also
                    for a great show.

                    We went to Last Mountain Lake yesterday and really had a good time.
                    This is the first time in our half dozen trips there that we walked
                    the whole way round the boardwalk area which took just over two
                    hours with our stops. The downfall was it was windier than heck
                    yesterday and cloudy but the upside points are great sightings and
                    the direction of the wind brought the Sandhill Crane chorkles to our
                    ears wherever we went.

                    We saw many Great-blue Herons and on one bend in the car drive sat
                    and watched a Black-crowned Night Heron really close standing so
                    still fishing in the quiet waters of the little corner. Also a
                    couple of Western Grebes and a Red-necked Grebe swam around in this
                    little area diving. Sandhill Cranes in flying smaller flocks were
                    seen throughout our drive and walk.

                    The boardwalk was our best birding. Highlights included five White-
                    faced Ibis in the area by the blind as well as 15 Black-crowned
                    Night Herons. When we came to the end of the boardwalk to the cut
                    path area through the grasses three Sandhill Cranes flew up
                    accompanied by a Whooping Crane. That was neat. We could see the
                    whooper quite clearly at first and the lovely black wing tips. We
                    continued to walk the path and actually did see where they landed
                    soooooooo far away. The reeds and water paths are very winding so we
                    didn't expect to see the whooper again but eventually did a great
                    distance away. It was foraging against a reed background with the
                    sandhills. One of the refuge personnel had seen it the day before
                    with a few sandhills. Anyway, we continued and a little further
                    north along the path and looking east we could see about 150
                    Sandhill Cranes in a low field area. We were told there are about
                    1500 there at the present. In previous years we have seen flocks of
                    them flying into the area towards dusk from wherever they have been
                    feeding. A few Swainson's Hawks and Northern Harriers could be seen
                    flying about the area.

                    We only gathered 31 recognizable species in the Last Mountain Lake
                    refuge location but had such a good outing and lots of exercise. We
                    didn't carry the scope into walking areas which would have helped
                    identify more waterfowl and shorebirds in the distance.

                    Val and Doyle T - McTaggart
                  • nikovich71
                    Hi Val and thankyou for your most kind words . I will be travelling to Last Mountain Lake this Friday . I m actually hoping to find a Peregrine or two and also
                    Message 9 of 20 , Sep 5, 2007
                      Hi Val and thankyou for your most kind words .

                      I will be travelling to Last Mountain Lake this Friday . I'm actually
                      hoping to find a Peregrine or two and also some Egrets. When you've
                      seen one White-faced Ibis ,they may as well be House Sparrows. Yeah
                      RIGHT ! I really hope to see those too :-)

                      Cheers

                      Nick

                      Saskatoon
                    • Jared Clarke
                      Today at 5:10 pm a Prairie Falcon was sitting on one of the light wells where Peregrines are often found. This is a first for me, PRFA in the middle of the
                      Message 10 of 20 , Sep 5, 2007
                        Today at 5:10 pm a Prairie Falcon was sitting on one of the light wells where Peregrines are often found.
                        This is a first for me, PRFA in the middle of the city.

                        The bird was sitting on the east side of the building, on the first well on the south end. Surprisingly in the shade.

                        Jared
                        Regina


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                      • Val
                        Nick, I hope you or Kaye-Lynn or Rocky or whoever else goes gets to see the Whooping Crane. We saw it by going on the boardwalk, be sure to sit in the blind
                        Message 11 of 20 , Sep 5, 2007
                          Nick, I hope you or Kaye-Lynn or Rocky or whoever else goes gets to
                          see the Whooping Crane. We saw it by going on the boardwalk, be sure
                          to sit in the blind for the ibises and night herons, and then walk
                          further along the boardwalk. After getting to the end of the boardwalk
                          just follow the cut path and eventually head north. Towards the east
                          you will hear/see a field of Sandhill Cranes with channels of water
                          and reeds also in that area. It was just before the field of cranes
                          where it was seen flying and landing. Also the whooping crane was seen
                          the day before we arrived by a staff person. The whole cut-grass walk
                          is excellent for sightings and you end up on the road your car is
                          parked on only quite a distance north of it!! Hopefully it won't rain
                          on you like it did us. Good luck. We had a Northern Flicker go into
                          our flicker box today. Where was it when the European Starlings used
                          it the box for two hatchings this summer!!

                          Val T

                          --- In Saskbirds@yahoogroups.com, "nikovich71" <nikovich71@...> wrote:
                          >
                          > Hi Val and thankyou for your most kind words .
                          >
                          > I will be travelling to Last Mountain Lake this Friday . I'm
                          actually
                          > hoping to find a Peregrine or two and also some Egrets. When you've
                          > seen one White-faced Ibis ,they may as well be House Sparrows. Yeah
                          > RIGHT ! I really hope to see those too :-)
                          >
                          > Cheers
                          >
                          > Nick
                          >
                          > Saskatoon
                          >
                        • rebel_xsrm
                          Thanks Val for all your information and observations.I would love to see the Whooping Crane,Ibises,Sandhills and any others that happen to be in the area.I
                          Message 12 of 20 , Sep 5, 2007
                            Thanks Val for all your information and observations.I would love to
                            see the Whooping Crane,Ibises,Sandhills and any others that happen to
                            be in the area.I hope they will remain for immediate future.I'm
                            eagerly anticipating this trip to one of best fall migration spots in
                            the province.Thanks to yourself and Kathy for all the kind words and
                            support.

                            Take care,
                            Rocky,Regina


                            >
                            > Nick, I hope you or Kaye-Lynn or Rocky or whoever else goes gets to
                            > see the Whooping Crane. We saw it by going on the boardwalk, be sure
                            > to sit in the blind for the ibises and night herons, and then walk
                            > further along the boardwalk. After getting to the end of the boardwalk
                            > just follow the cut path and eventually head north. Towards the east
                            > you will hear/see a field of Sandhill Cranes with channels of water
                            > and reeds also in that area. It was just before the field of cranes
                            > where it was seen flying and landing. Also the whooping crane was seen
                            > the day before we arrived by a staff person. The whole cut-grass walk
                            > is excellent for sightings and you end up on the road your car is
                            > parked on only quite a distance north of it!! Hopefully it won't rain
                            > on you like it did us. Good luck. We had a Northern Flicker go into
                            > our flicker box today. Where was it when the European Starlings used
                            > it the box for two hatchings this summer!!
                            >
                            > Val T
                            >
                            > --- In Saskbirds@yahoogroups.com, "nikovich71" <nikovich71@> wrote:
                            > >
                            > > Hi Val and thankyou for your most kind words .
                            > >
                            > > I will be travelling to Last Mountain Lake this Friday . I'm
                            > actually
                            > > hoping to find a Peregrine or two and also some Egrets. When you've
                            > > seen one White-faced Ibis ,they may as well be House Sparrows. Yeah
                            > > RIGHT ! I really hope to see those too :-)
                            > >
                            > > Cheers
                            > >
                            > > Nick
                            > >
                            > > Saskatoon
                            > >
                            >
                          • Val
                            As soon as the coffee is made we re off again to LML. We must be nuts or brilliant!! At any rate we re not rich but happy. Chance of rain but who can sit
                            Message 13 of 20 , Sep 8, 2007
                              As soon as the coffee is made we're off again to LML. We must be nuts
                              or brilliant!! At any rate we're not rich but happy. Chance of rain
                              but who can sit around waiting for that! We're hoping to catch all
                              those bitterns and more ibises this time. We're taking a different
                              route up on #6 and coming back by #20. It's about a 2 1/2-hour drive
                              one way. We still have numerous Swainson's Hawks flying about the yard
                              and they are not afraid to come down quite close.

                              Val T - McTaggart
                            • Val
                              Our trip this afternoon to the LML area was quite successful. West of Highway 20 on the gravel road leading to the refuge there were small sloughs. We saw a
                              Message 14 of 20 , Sep 8, 2007
                                Our trip this afternoon to the LML area was quite successful. West
                                of Highway 20 on the gravel road leading to the refuge there were
                                small sloughs. We saw a large group of American Avocets foraging in
                                one and a another large group of Lesser Yellowlegs and Short-billed
                                Dowitchers on the other side. Numerous Swainson's Hawks are in the
                                area and about half a dozen Northern Harriers. Oh, I should mention
                                a very handsome Rough-legged Hawk was sitting on the nuisance ground
                                fence just south of our place when we left.

                                As we drove around the north end of LML we saw several Great-blue
                                Herons and lots of Pied-billed Grebes. Western Grebes and Red-necked
                                Grebes were also around. We also saw two American Bitterns. After we
                                started turning north on the tour drive we saw a large flock of
                                about 1,000 Sandhill Cranes flying in to the reed area quite a bit
                                east of the road. I said we should watch for the Whooping Crane and
                                low and behold, about 3/4 along the huge flock was this beautiful
                                big white bird with black wing tips. They landed, still a long
                                distance away. This time we set up our scope. We were out watching
                                the Whooping Crane walking along the water with the Sandhills and a
                                truck came along. To our pleasant surprise it was friends of ours
                                Dewey and Delores from Weyburn who have been travelling about almost
                                all summer. They are camping and enjoy birding. We told them we had
                                a Whooping Crane in the scope and they sure jumped out quickly. We
                                had a great half hour visit along the roadside while peeking
                                periodically at the crane. Thank goodness four of us saw it!! All of
                                the cranes then took off and landed in the field on a slight
                                hillside further east. The Whooping Crane still stood out like a
                                sore thumb, no matter where we went. Showers came and went but it
                                wasn't windy. I really enjoyed sitting in the blind when it was
                                raining quite heavily. We saw lots of other species but these were
                                highlights.

                                Val and Doyle T - McTaggart
                              • Kevin
                                Not camping this weekend but thinking I ll do a day trip to Last Mountain Lake on Sunday. So a few questions: 1. People have posted visiting the bird banding
                                Message 15 of 20 , Aug 26, 2011
                                  Not camping this weekend but thinking I'll do a day trip to Last Mountain Lake on Sunday. So a few questions:

                                  1. People have posted visiting the bird banding station. Is that generally accepted or is it disruptive to the folks working there? I've been in that area before but always outside of actual bird banding season.

                                  2. If they accept visitors then is there a particular time?

                                  3. Are the road and trails open in the sanctuary? Last time I was there only a small part of the road was open and some others were still under water. Having camped 2 weekends ago in PANP with many trails closed or partly closed due to high waters and camping last weekend in Spruce Woods Pr Pk with similar closed trails - I want to be more cautious.

                                  Thank you folks.

                                  Kevin
                                • frannibird
                                  Morning birders. Headed out to Rowan s Ravine on Last Mountain Lake yesterday. Silly me had a low battery on my camera and my spare hadn t been charged! SO I
                                  Message 16 of 20 , Sep 4, 2011
                                    Morning birders. Headed out to Rowan's Ravine on Last Mountain Lake yesterday. Silly me had a low battery on my camera and my spare hadn't been charged! SO I bypassed Valeport (argh!) to save any picture taking for Rowan's Ravine.

                                    Pretty quiet, although the cedar waxwings are making great berry meals from the bushes. A photo has been added to the "Species in Saskatchewan" album. Usually together, one sat nicely for me overhead while I took about 10 pics, then flew off.

                                    Other than a few california gulls with the ring-billed at the beach (and Canada Geese), mourning doves on the wires, and a house wren in the neighbourhood at home (and grackles), it's been pretty quiet.
                                  • Kevin
                                    Just got back from a fairly quick trip up to LML. Went to the provincial park first and looked for the island that Al mentioned that cattle egrets come back
                                    Message 17 of 20 , Sep 10, 2011
                                      Just got back from a fairly quick trip up to LML. Went to the provincial park first and looked for the island that Al mentioned that cattle egrets come back to roost on. If it's the piece of land across the lake then I'd have needed my scope and not just my binos if the birds were there.

                                      Overall it was a good day but not overall productive although tall birds were easy to see. Saw sandhill cranes (100+), Great Blue Heron (5-6), American Bittern (1) and Yellow crowned Night Heron (9). The road through the sanctuary continues to be closed although the piece that I walked certainly seemed dry and stable enough to handle cars. The problem with walking is that as Bob points out, the car acts like a blind and many birds don't react to the car. But on foot I was flushing birds frequently which was bothering me. I was walking back to my car as the sun set and it was lovely. Lots of activity. The grasses next to the road were frequently being rattled with something larger than a bird. Suspect voles but not sure. Muskrats EVERYWHERE.

                                      Kevin in Lumsden
                                    • Kevin
                                      Duh! Ryan pointed out I wrote Yellow instead of Black crowned night herons. Sorry folks if I got you excited. :-) Kevin
                                      Message 18 of 20 , Sep 11, 2011
                                        Duh! Ryan pointed out I wrote Yellow instead of Black crowned night herons. Sorry folks if I got you excited. :-)

                                        Kevin

                                        --- In Saskbirds@yahoogroups.com, "Kevin" <kmscouts@...> wrote:
                                        >
                                        > Just got back from a fairly quick trip up to LML. Went to the provincial park first and looked for the island that Al mentioned that cattle egrets come back to roost on. If it's the piece of land across the lake then I'd have needed my scope and not just my binos if the birds were there.
                                        >
                                        > Overall it was a good day but not overall productive although tall birds were easy to see. Saw sandhill cranes (100+), Great Blue Heron (5-6), American Bittern (1) and Yellow crowned Night Heron (9). The road through the sanctuary continues to be closed although the piece that I walked certainly seemed dry and stable enough to handle cars. The problem with walking is that as Bob points out, the car acts like a blind and many birds don't react to the car. But on foot I was flushing birds frequently which was bothering me. I was walking back to my car as the sun set and it was lovely. Lots of activity. The grasses next to the road were frequently being rattled with something larger than a bird. Suspect voles but not sure. Muskrats EVERYWHERE.
                                        >
                                        > Kevin in Lumsden
                                        >
                                      • Kevin
                                        After hearing of people s recent trips to LML, I drove up yesterday. Hoping for both a Whooper or a Smith s Longspur. Didn t find either but it was still a
                                        Message 19 of 20 , Oct 1, 2012
                                          After hearing of people's recent trips to LML, I drove up yesterday. Hoping for both a Whooper or a Smith's Longspur. Didn't find either but it was still a great day. Started out overcast with a little rain. Was the first rain I remember since a thunder storm back in mid-August and even that was in NS. Just enough to keep the dust down at least in the morning. Sun came out in the afternoon and it was another great prairie day.

                                          Saw many large flocks of the geese and cranes passing through. Saw more passerines than I thought I'd see. Quick recap:

                                          Greater White-fronted Geese - hundreds (thousands?)
                                          Snow Geese - thousands
                                          Canada Goose - 80-100
                                          Tundra Swan - 6 at LMLCA
                                          Mallard - 50+
                                          Teal sp - 3-5
                                          Canvasback 8+
                                          Bufflehead 10+
                                          Hooded Merganser 1 (at LML regional park)
                                          Ruddy Duck 30+
                                          Grebes - many
                                          Pelicans - 30+
                                          Great Blue Heron - 12+ in most areas going up, there and coming back
                                          Harrier - 10+
                                          Merlin - 1 chasing smaller bird at LMLCA
                                          Coots - hundreds but not as many as recent birding trips
                                          Sandhill Crane - 200+ all just N of LMLCA
                                          Greater Yellowlegs - 5
                                          Killdeer - 4
                                          Ring-billed Gull - 10+
                                          Franklin's Gull - 12+
                                          Rock Dove
                                          Mourning Dove - 6+ almost all in LML regional park
                                          Flicker - 1 LML reg park
                                          Magpies - 12+ most areas
                                          Crows - 10+
                                          no ravens oddly
                                          Chickadees - 10+
                                          RB Nuthatch - 1
                                          House Wren - think so, just saw glimpse but several caught that morning in nets at LML regional park
                                          Robin - 8+ most in one flock
                                          Yellow-rumped Warblers - 25+ in flocks in several spots
                                          Orange-crowned Warbler - likely, wasn't too sure but going back to FG makes me think it was. With flock of yellow-rumps.
                                          American Tree Sparrows - 4 in different areas around LML
                                          Savannah Sparrow - 2 (one on either side of the lake)
                                          Juncos - 15+ in many areas
                                          Meadowlarks - 25+ in most areas and often in small groups
                                          Horned Larks - 5+ likely more but birds were skittish
                                          Blackbirds - hundreds but didn't try to ID plus most flew in large flocks too far away
                                          Goldfinch - 1 fly by on highway
                                          House Sparrow - 10+

                                          I did find many birds skittish yesterday especially the geese. You'd slow down on the highway and birds would take off even though they were easily half a km away. Found out that hunting season on both sides of the lake is open and 7 days a week so the likely reason they were skittish.

                                          Only saw two mammals, a lone deer and a badger in a field.

                                          Will post some pictures on Facebook tonight.

                                          Kevin in Regina
                                        • valndoyle
                                          Doyle and I drove to the north end of Last Mountain Lake on Sunday. It was sunny and nice here then clouded over and became really windy as we headed further
                                          Message 20 of 20 , Sep 17, 2015
                                            Doyle and I drove to the north end of Last Mountain Lake on Sunday. It was sunny and nice here then clouded over and became really windy as we headed further north. We didn't see as much as hoped but enjoyed the drive very much. At the Last Mountain Lake location we saw two Northern Harriers, one Red-tailed Hawk, one Merlin, eight American Pelicans, hundreds of American Coots, a few Mallards, one Greater Yellowlegs, three Willets, one American Wigeon, five or so Yellow-rumped Warblers, nine Killdeer, 10 Western Meadowlarks, 12 American Robins, one Great-blue Heron, and there were a few Sandhill Cranes flying about in groupings of four to six. One coyote was walking along a shoreline south of where the wooden boardwalk used to be.

                                            Along #99 we noticed a lot of garter snakes crossing the road. We stopped at the Kennell Anglican Church and I stepped out to take a photo. A snake was right beside my foot. Did you hear the scream?? Never mind the fact it was dead. We scared up four Gray Partridge.

                                            Right now I've been invited to sit out on the deck with a coffee and listen to a Crow cawing in the back trees. We have a Merlin in the yard, It enjoyed a pigeon and has been seen twice attacking Black-billed Magpies which so far have managed to get away. The Barn Swallows are still swooping about. We have left our hummingbird feeders up which are being used now by butterflies.

                                            I believe on Sunday morning we saw a Jim Nordquist birder riding a bike along Albert Street as we inched our way along on the west side in the car heading north while marathon runners were heading south along the east side of Albert Street.

                                            Val and Doyle T - McTaggart
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