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Great Horned Owls

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  • Martin Bailey
    This morning three GHOW, all within a hundred feet of each other, were seen in a tree bluff in the Weyburn area. One - very pale gray underneath, pale gray
    Message 1 of 12 , Dec 31, 2003
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      This morning three GHOW, all within a hundred feet of each other, were seen
      in a tree bluff in the Weyburn area.

      One - very pale gray underneath, pale gray face, calm and placid as it
      looked at us. (Johnnie Whitell, Martin Bailey and Carol Bjorklund)

      Two - slightly darker overall, pale brown face, a bit more sharp look in its
      eye, just a bit larger than the first.

      Both of these birds had very worn and frayed plumage. Carol assumes that
      the male to be gray One, and the female browner Two. This is at a site
      where two chicks were banded this year by Kelly Kozij.on May 15.

      Three - quite large and fluffy, feathers not worn out. Face very pale
      brownish, underparts grayish, seeming to be a cross between the colouring of
      One and Two. It is assumed that this might be one of the young of the
      year. All three were very calm about each other's presence.

      It is expected that the adults would have chased their offspring of the year
      away by now. And it is particularly odd since one of the owls was heard
      hooting three weeks ago which is normally associated with mating and
      territorial behaviour.

      Martin
    • Scott Wilson
      Thanks Martin and Carol: very interesting. Scott
      Message 2 of 12 , Nov 27, 2006
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        Thanks Martin and Carol: very interesting.

        Scott


        On 061127 10:49 AM, "Bailey and Bjorklund" <cmbb@...> wrote:

        >
        >
        >> I saw five Great Horned Owls at one time along a 100-m stretch of
        > Manybones
        >> Creek (30 km SE of Regina) yesterday. There were no trees or shrubs
        > around.
        >> They flew up from the ground beside the creek, and there were two sets of
        >> tracks on the road beside it where a bird (owl?) had sat.
        >
        > It is common for Short-eared Owls to be found in ditches and other low lying
        > areas, and living in groups in the winter. Unlike Great Horned Owls, who
        > are quite solitary when not breeding, SEOW hang out together then.
        >
        > Martin and Carol
        >
        >
      • Bailey and Bjorklund
        ... Manybones ... around. ... It is common for Short-eared Owls to be found in ditches and other low lying areas, and living in groups in the winter. Unlike
        Message 3 of 12 , Nov 27, 2006
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          > I saw five Great Horned Owls at one time along a 100-m stretch of
          Manybones
          > Creek (30 km SE of Regina) yesterday. There were no trees or shrubs
          around.
          > They flew up from the ground beside the creek, and there were two sets of
          > tracks on the road beside it where a bird (owl?) had sat.

          It is common for Short-eared Owls to be found in ditches and other low lying
          areas, and living in groups in the winter. Unlike Great Horned Owls, who
          are quite solitary when not breeding, SEOW hang out together then.

          Martin and Carol



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        • Scott Wilson
          Four of these flew up from my shelterbelt this morning and circled the yard for a few minutes. Quite a treat. Scott
          Message 4 of 12 , Nov 28, 2006
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            Four of these flew up from my shelterbelt this morning and circled the yard
            for a few minutes. Quite a treat.
            Scott


            On 061127 10:49 AM, "Bailey and Bjorklund" <cmbb@...> wrote:

            >
            >
            >> I saw five Great Horned Owls at one time along a 100-m stretch of
            > Manybones
            >> Creek (30 km SE of Regina) yesterday. There were no trees or shrubs
            > around.
            >> They flew up from the ground beside the creek, and there were two sets of
            >> tracks on the road beside it where a bird (owl?) had sat.
            >
            > It is common for Short-eared Owls to be found in ditches and other low lying
            > areas, and living in groups in the winter. Unlike Great Horned Owls, who
            > are quite solitary when not breeding, SEOW hang out together then.
            >
            > Martin and Carol
            >
            >
          • Bruce Wilson
            I have noticed in a number of pictures taken by Nick the great horned owls seem to be a very light colour. The ones I see in Ontario are much more brown. Is
            Message 5 of 12 , Apr 27, 2007
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              I have noticed in a number of pictures taken by Nick the great horned
              owls seem to be a very light colour. The ones I see in Ontario are
              much more brown. Is this an eastern vs western colour phase thing?

              Bruce Wilson
              Barrie, Ontario, Canada
              Life Member NMRA Member Scale 7 Group Gauge 0 Guild
            • Bailey and Bjorklund
              Mostly what we see here in Saskatchewan are subarcticus. Darker birds are noted on the west coast and in eastern Canada. These are not colour phases but
              Message 6 of 12 , Apr 27, 2007
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                Mostly what we see here in Saskatchewan are subarcticus. Darker birds are
                noted on the west coast and in eastern Canada.
                These are not colour phases but sub-species. Of which there are many.

                Nice heads-up, Bruce.

                Martin

                ----- Original Message -----
                From: "Bruce Wilson" <wilsonbrucea@...>
                To: <Saskbirds@yahoogroups.com>
                Sent: Friday, April 27, 2007 1:52 PM
                Subject: [Saskbirds] Great Horned Owls


                > I have noticed in a number of pictures taken by Nick the great horned
                > owls seem to be a very light colour. The ones I see in Ontario are
                > much more brown. Is this an eastern vs western colour phase thing?
                >
                > Bruce Wilson
                > Barrie, Ontario, Canada
                > Life Member NMRA Member Scale 7 Group Gauge 0 Guild
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                > Yahoo! Groups Links
                >
                >
                >
                >
              • Bruce Wilson
                ... Martin: Thanks for the answer. - Bruce Wilson Barrie, Ontario Life Member NMRA Member Gauge 0 Guild Member Scale 7 Group -- No virus found in
                Message 7 of 12 , Apr 28, 2007
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                  At 22:12 27/04/2007, you wrote:

                  >Mostly what we see here in Saskatchewan are subarcticus. Darker birds are
                  >noted on the west coast and in eastern Canada.
                  >These are not colour phases but sub-species. Of which there are many.
                  >
                  >Nice heads-up, Bruce.
                  >
                  >Martin


                  Martin:

                  Thanks for the answer.

                  -
                  Bruce Wilson
                  Barrie, Ontario
                  Life Member NMRA Member Gauge 0 Guild Member Scale 7 Group


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                • lotsalilies123
                  Last night, around 7:30, I once again heard owls hooting, and they were very near. I went out intending to walk up the alley to see if I could pinpoint where
                  Message 8 of 12 , Oct 9, 2007
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                    Last night, around 7:30, I once again heard owls hooting, and they
                    were very near. I went out intending to walk up the alley to see if I
                    could pinpoint where the closest one might be perched. Didn't take
                    long - I crossed the street and just as I passed the power pole the
                    hooting came from above. I shone a small flashing up and there he was
                    on top of the pole. He looked at me for a bit, then flew to the next
                    pole.

                    In total there were 4 owls hooting. Two were very near - the one I saw
                    plus one with a higher pitched call slightly further away. Two others
                    were in the distance - probably near the bush about 2 blocks west.
                    Again, one lower and one higher in pitch. In the dark and with this
                    area of town lacking somewhat in the way of street lighting, there
                    wouldn't have been a hope of me finding more.

                    I'd like to find their roosting sight. In the immediate vicinity, I
                    suspect the church/graveyard area might be worth a more extensive
                    search - it's a large area with a perimeter of big old evergreen
                    trees. I've walked thru there many times but haven't searched the
                    ground for owl pellets.

                    A question, if I were to find a roosting sight, can I expect to find
                    another close by - as in a male and female roosting near to each
                    other? Would tall evergreens be the best place to search for a
                    roosting sight? Everything else in the area is deciduous. Or might
                    they, perhaps, go into an old barn or some other abandoned building
                    during the day? There is a big old barn nearby, but one more good gust
                    from the west and that thing will be lying flat so there's no chance
                    I'm going in there.

                    If anyone has any helpful tips, I'm happy to hear them.

                    Thanks

                    Sharon in Ituna
                  • bernardtremblay
                    On a superb day, ideal for snowshoeing on a crust of packed snow, at Condie Reserve, I saw one great horned owl nesting while another was standing beside the
                    Message 9 of 12 , Mar 2, 2013
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                      On a superb day, ideal for snowshoeing on a crust of packed snow, at Condie Reserve, I saw one great horned owl nesting while another was standing beside the nest. I will try to find out when the earliest nesting record is for Great Horned Owls in Saskatchewan. March 2nd seems pretty early for me.

                      I did not see the hawk owl at the usual location identified by several observers. I saw it only once on Feb 16th. I am not sure if presence of the great horned owls would affect the appearance of the hawk owl although the nest is approximately 1 km away.

                      I also saw a sharp tailed grouse. I frequently see at leat one when I go to Condie Reserve.
                      About 4 km to the west of the intersection between highway 11 and road 734 I saw and heard a flock of 15 larks and two grey partridges. On my way back to Regina I saw one snowy owl 1 km west of Pasqua street and another even closer to the city at 1 km to the west of Albert street (highway 6).

                      Bernard Tremblay,

                      Regina.
                    • Shadick, Stan
                      According to Birds of the Saskatoon Area (available from Nature Saskatchewan), the Great Horned Owl is usually sitting on eggs before mid-March with the
                      Message 10 of 12 , Mar 4, 2013
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                        According to "Birds of the Saskatoon Area" (available from Nature Saskatchewan), the Great Horned Owl is usually sitting on eggs before mid-March with the earliest recorded date of 20 February. They may nest even earlier in the Regina area.

                        Stan Shadick

                        -----Original Message-----
                        From: Saskbirds@yahoogroups.com [mailto:Saskbirds@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of bernardtremblay
                        Sent: Sunday, March 03, 2013 12:12 AM
                        To: Saskbirds@yahoogroups.com
                        Subject: [Saskbirds] Great Horned Owls

                        On a superb day, ideal for snowshoeing on a crust of packed snow, at Condie Reserve, I saw one great horned owl nesting while another was standing beside the nest. I will try to find out when the earliest nesting record is for Great Horned Owls in Saskatchewan. March 2nd seems pretty early for me.

                        I did not see the hawk owl at the usual location identified by several observers. I saw it only once on Feb 16th. I am not sure if presence of the great horned owls would affect the appearance of the hawk owl although the nest is approximately 1 km away.


                        I also saw a sharp tailed grouse. I frequently see at leat one when I go to Condie Reserve.
                        About 4 km to the west of the intersection between highway 11 and road 734 I saw and heard a flock of 15 larks and two grey partridges. On my way back to Regina I saw one snowy owl 1 km west of Pasqua street and another even closer to the city at 1 km to the west of Albert street (highway 6).

                        Bernard Tremblay,

                        Regina.



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                      • christian artuso
                        In Manitoba, Great Horned Owls in suburban areas can sometimes nest up to 6 weeks in advance of GHOW in rural areas. The earliest egg laying in Manitoba, as
                        Message 11 of 12 , Mar 4, 2013
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                          In Manitoba, Great Horned Owls in suburban areas can sometimes nest up to 6 weeks in advance of GHOW in rural areas. The earliest egg laying in Manitoba, as noted in my article in Blue Jay some years ago, was January 15th, in a particularly mild winter. This winter is colder by comparison but some of the Winnipeg pairs were already incubating by late February. At least one pair in a rural area of Manitoba has now been reported sitting on the nest.

                          Christian Artuso (Winnipeg, Manitoba)

                          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                        • trilobita2004
                          I saw my first pair of great horned owls today, near Saskatoon. Is it normal for them to be the sub-arctic morph here? Also saw many Northern Harriers,
                          Message 12 of 12 , Mar 31
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                            I saw my first pair of great horned owls today, near Saskatoon. Is it normal for them to be the sub-arctic morph here? Also saw many Northern Harriers, Red-Tailed hawks, snow geese, Canada geese and a pair of Mountain Bluebirds. Michael

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