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Re: Winter blues

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  • auntielyk
    ... Always enjoy your stories Val! Every cloud has a silver lining and I m happy you found yours during that storm yesterday! This has been a good birding
    Message 1 of 4 , Mar 12 12:31 PM
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      --- In Saskbirds@yahoogroups.com, "Val T" <val_doyle_thomas@...> wrote:
      >
      > We are in a situation that there is no place in our farmyard to put snow any more and getting stuck with the tractor. That coupled with three exciting stays in blizzards this year (8 hrs, 3 1/2 hrs and 2 hours) in the vehicle makes for an interesting winter. Yesterday the white-out came up when I was coming home from Weyburn so we silly ones crept along the highway with emergency flashers on in extremely limited visibility. They closed the highway around then. When turning onto the country road in no time I was stuck - another case of white-sheet thrown on the windshield. The roads have high ridges along them and fill in with every blow. So this stay was only 2 1/2 hours before Doyle could venture out to get me and we still had to leave the car there and walk ahead of the truck in howling winds to see where the road was sometimes.
      >
      > It's best to make the most of these situations and a plug for CBC radio - just loved listening to everything you offered every time and in a weird way enjoyed the time spent. A carafe of hot coffee and water is always along as well.
      >
      > So the birding part of this story is - yesterday while sitting in the storm a group of 11 Sharp-tailed Grouse flew out of the side bushes and made a wonderful flying formation right in front of the vehicle. What a great close view right close to the window. They swerved and flew past again, a little further ahead, about seeing distance.
      >
      > The Downy Woodpecker is at the dining room window suet feeder right now. He is quite tame. The Hairy flies off whenever we move. Lots and lots of Horned Lark groupings around now.
      >
      > Val T - McTaggart
      >
      Always enjoy your stories Val! Every cloud has a silver lining and I'm happy you found yours during that storm yesterday!
      This has been a good birding week for me--eight snowy owls, horned larks, raven, snow buntings and coyotes on Tuesday along Hwy 33, 35 and 306, Great Horned Owl and Northern Shrike along with a flicker and other regulars in AE Wilson park on Thursday and now this morning--went for the Nature Regina walk in Dieppe area and saw my first of the wintering SC Juncos then went for a little drive and found a Snowy Owl sitting on the Yield sign at the grid crossing north of Sherwood Forest! She was in no hurry to move on so I got a good look at her before a truck went by ...
      Hope to see you during Spring birding!
      Laurie in Lakeridge
    • Kevin
      Combining your winter coffee breaks and CBC, a few years ago CBC interviewed a guy, I think from SaskPower, who frequently got caught on the road. He loved
      Message 2 of 4 , Mar 12 1:23 PM
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        Combining your winter "coffee" breaks and CBC, a few years ago CBC interviewed a guy, I think from SaskPower, who frequently got caught on the road. He loved it. He'd pull off somewhere that he could be hit - maybe an access into a field. Then he hunkered down for the duration. He had food, a heat source, had a stove for tea, coffee, soup, always had a book to read and a warm sleeping bag. It was a forced quiet time. When the weather passed and the plough cleared the road, he used his shovel to clear his route to the plowed highway and off he went.

        I loved that concept so I travel with two smaller rubber maid tubs in my trunk. One is a complete set of heavy duty winter clothes including boots. The other is a tub with heat candles, sterno stove, pot, food/tea etc. and even a propane bottle and stove and heater - assuming it's warm enough to use propane. And I carry two books that I've never read but want to some day: Robinson Crusoe and Gulliver's Travels. (And a copy of the Memoirs of Sherlock Holmes which I have read multiple times.) Plus my winter sleeping bag.

        Fortunately, but also a little unfortunately, I've never had to use this stuff in the 6-7 years since I started to carry it.

        Kevin in Lumsden

        --- In Saskbirds@yahoogroups.com, "Val T" <val_doyle_thomas@...> wrote:
        >
        > We are in a situation that there is no place in our farmyard to put snow any more and getting stuck with the tractor. That coupled with three exciting stays in blizzards this year (8 hrs, 3 1/2 hrs and 2 hours) in the vehicle makes for an interesting winter. Yesterday the white-out came up when I was coming home from Weyburn so we silly ones crept along the highway with emergency flashers on in extremely limited visibility. They closed the highway around then. When turning onto the country road in no time I was stuck - another case of white-sheet thrown on the windshield. The roads have high ridges along them and fill in with every blow. So this stay was only 2 1/2 hours before Doyle could venture out to get me and we still had to leave the car there and walk ahead of the truck in howling winds to see where the road was sometimes.
        >
        > It's best to make the most of these situations and a plug for CBC radio - just loved listening to everything you offered every time and in a weird way enjoyed the time spent. A carafe of hot coffee and water is always along as well.
        >
        > So the birding part of this story is - yesterday while sitting in the storm a group of 11 Sharp-tailed Grouse flew out of the side bushes and made a wonderful flying formation right in front of the vehicle. What a great close view right close to the window. They swerved and flew past again, a little further ahead, about seeing distance.
        >
        > The Downy Woodpecker is at the dining room window suet feeder right now. He is quite tame. The Hairy flies off whenever we move. Lots and lots of Horned Lark groupings around now.
        >
        > Val T - McTaggart
        >
      • mkekiss33
        I love reading stories like this... the positive aspects is what I am referring to of course. Thanks for sharing :)
        Message 3 of 4 , Mar 12 3:02 PM
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          I love reading stories like this... the positive aspects is what I am referring to of course. Thanks for sharing :)


          --- In Saskbirds@yahoogroups.com, "Kevin" <moorek@...> wrote:
          >
          > Combining your winter "coffee" breaks and CBC, a few years ago CBC interviewed a guy, I think from SaskPower, who frequently got caught on the road. He loved it. He'd pull off somewhere that he could be hit - maybe an access into a field. Then he hunkered down for the duration. He had food, a heat source, had a stove for tea, coffee, soup, always had a book to read and a warm sleeping bag. It was a forced quiet time. When the weather passed and the plough cleared the road, he used his shovel to clear his route to the plowed highway and off he went.
          >
          > I loved that concept so I travel with two smaller rubber maid tubs in my trunk. One is a complete set of heavy duty winter clothes including boots. The other is a tub with heat candles, sterno stove, pot, food/tea etc. and even a propane bottle and stove and heater - assuming it's warm enough to use propane. And I carry two books that I've never read but want to some day: Robinson Crusoe and Gulliver's Travels. (And a copy of the Memoirs of Sherlock Holmes which I have read multiple times.) Plus my winter sleeping bag.
          >
          > Fortunately, but also a little unfortunately, I've never had to use this stuff in the 6-7 years since I started to carry it.
          >
          > Kevin in Lumsden
          >
          > --- In Saskbirds@yahoogroups.com, "Val T" <val_doyle_thomas@> wrote:
          > >
          > > We are in a situation that there is no place in our farmyard to put snow any more and getting stuck with the tractor. That coupled with three exciting stays in blizzards this year (8 hrs, 3 1/2 hrs and 2 hours) in the vehicle makes for an interesting winter. Yesterday the white-out came up when I was coming home from Weyburn so we silly ones crept along the highway with emergency flashers on in extremely limited visibility. They closed the highway around then. When turning onto the country road in no time I was stuck - another case of white-sheet thrown on the windshield. The roads have high ridges along them and fill in with every blow. So this stay was only 2 1/2 hours before Doyle could venture out to get me and we still had to leave the car there and walk ahead of the truck in howling winds to see where the road was sometimes.
          > >
          > > It's best to make the most of these situations and a plug for CBC radio - just loved listening to everything you offered every time and in a weird way enjoyed the time spent. A carafe of hot coffee and water is always along as well.
          > >
          > > So the birding part of this story is - yesterday while sitting in the storm a group of 11 Sharp-tailed Grouse flew out of the side bushes and made a wonderful flying formation right in front of the vehicle. What a great close view right close to the window. They swerved and flew past again, a little further ahead, about seeing distance.
          > >
          > > The Downy Woodpecker is at the dining room window suet feeder right now. He is quite tame. The Hairy flies off whenever we move. Lots and lots of Horned Lark groupings around now.
          > >
          > > Val T - McTaggart
          > >
          >
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