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Gulls In Regina

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  • Kathy Hedegard
    Hmmmm, okay, guys (and I mean the Regina Gull Watchers), it was April 9, 2009 that I raced on up to Regina to see the Great Black-backed Gull and a Glaucous
    Message 1 of 2 , Apr 1, 2010
      Hmmmm, okay, guys (and I mean the Regina Gull Watchers), it was April 9, 2009 that I raced on up to Regina to see the Great Black-backed Gull and a Glaucous Gull. I will be quite disappointed if there's nothing rare again this year! Can I possibly be hankering for the bone-chilling vigil? Well, yes, if it means seeing a Lifer. I know every one of those thousands of gulls has been scoped and studied by Bob, Steven and Dan plus several others. It sounds as if the ice isn't going to last for many more evenings of viewing.

      The ice on Boundary and Rafferty is thinning and starting to break up. I guess our dump just isn't big enough to attract more than 20-25 gulls at any time.

      Yesterday morning there was quite a few flocks of Snow Geese flying over, but it wasn't a big migration day (here at least). I went looking for feeding flocks last evening but didn't find any within my immediate area.

      Many Am. Robins, Dark-eyed Juncos, House Finches, European Starlings; a few Am. Goldfinches and Pine Siskins.

      The WW Crossbills at Woodlawn have moved on. I saw my f-o-y Killdeer poking around in a swampy ditch. The W. Meadowlark population is growing daily. The Am. Crows continue to stream through the region.

      A male Merlin screams around my part of town every so often. And I've heard Northern Flickers drumming on various metal things the past couple of days. A former neighbour, a shift worker at the coal mines, once got so infuriated by a flicker drumming on the metal chimney, he stormed out of his house and threw a shoe at the bird. He then got even more ticked off when he had to get out the ladder to climb up onto the roof to retrieve his shoe. Ah, good times.

      Kathy in Estevan

      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Dan Heffernan
      The flicker story puts me in mind of the time I woke up early one morning to hear something scrambling about in our fireplace chimney, just above the closed
      Message 2 of 2 , Apr 1, 2010
        The flicker story puts me in mind of the time I woke up early one morning to hear something scrambling about in our fireplace chimney, just above the closed vent. I opened the vent and a northern flicker dropped into the (cold) ashes in the fireplace. I spent the next ten minutes trying to catch him with one hand while holding the fireplace screen closed with the other, while the bird screamed at the top of his lungs. I finally caught him without injury, carried him to the front door and released him into the neighbourhood, still screaming away. I had no idea flickers could even make that noise.

        Dan Heffernan
        Prince Albert

        ----- Original Message -----
        From: Kathy Hedegard
        To: Saskbirds
        Sent: Thursday, April 01, 2010 8:51 AM
        Subject: [Saskbirds] Gulls In Regina



        Hmmmm, okay, guys (and I mean the Regina Gull Watchers), it was April 9, 2009 that I raced on up to Regina to see the Great Black-backed Gull and a Glaucous Gull. I will be quite disappointed if there's nothing rare again this year! Can I possibly be hankering for the bone-chilling vigil? Well, yes, if it means seeing a Lifer. I know every one of those thousands of gulls has been scoped and studied by Bob, Steven and Dan plus several others. It sounds as if the ice isn't going to last for many more evenings of viewing.

        The ice on Boundary and Rafferty is thinning and starting to break up. I guess our dump just isn't big enough to attract more than 20-25 gulls at any time.

        Yesterday morning there was quite a few flocks of Snow Geese flying over, but it wasn't a big migration day (here at least). I went looking for feeding flocks last evening but didn't find any within my immediate area.

        Many Am. Robins, Dark-eyed Juncos, House Finches, European Starlings; a few Am. Goldfinches and Pine Siskins.

        The WW Crossbills at Woodlawn have moved on. I saw my f-o-y Killdeer poking around in a swampy ditch. The W. Meadowlark population is growing daily. The Am. Crows continue to stream through the region.

        A male Merlin screams around my part of town every so often. And I've heard Northern Flickers drumming on various metal things the past couple of days. A former neighbour, a shift worker at the coal mines, once got so infuriated by a flicker drumming on the metal chimney, he stormed out of his house and threw a shoe at the bird. He then got even more ticked off when he had to get out the ladder to climb up onto the roof to retrieve his shoe. Ah, good times.

        Kathy in Estevan

        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]





        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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