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Re: looking for an expert

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  • scarey1917
    I m not an expert on Sartre s fiction,
    Message 1 of 3 , May 6 1:00 PM
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      <<<<<<<<<<<<<<I wonder if u can guide me to some resources on Triology
      (Age of Reason, The Reprieve,...>>>>>>>>>>>>

      I'm not an "expert" on Sartre's fiction, although I am just now
      finishing up re-reading the second novel in the "Roads to Freedom"
      trilogy, "The Reprieve." As in "The Age of Reason" the main character
      is Mathieu Delarue who appears to be a stand-in for Sartre himself. He
      seems to be the same age as Sartre, is a philosophy teacher, single -
      but always involved with women, consumed with the issue of
      his "freedom", and so on. The trilogy moves from the most intimate of
      issues (Marcelle's unwanted pregnancy)and the place of indivudual
      freedom, to the envelopment of that freedom by the crushing weight of
      history. As the second book ends, Mathieu has been called up for
      service in the French army, and is reporting for duty (things can't be
      good when philosophers are being drafted!). I'm sure any library has
      books on Sartre's fiction. There's an anthology called "Sartre: A
      Collection of Critical Essays" that has material on his novels.
    • salosohail
      Thank you for some lead. i am also planning to re-read the Roads to Freedom but i thought of reading certain view points regarding it as my first read was
      Message 2 of 3 , May 10 10:31 AM
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        Thank you for some lead. i am also planning to re-read the "Roads to
        Freedom" but i thought of reading certain view points regarding it
        as my first read was not a complete success. i think in "Roads to
        Freedom" it is much difficult to grasp the existential themes that
        Sartre propounded in "Nausea". one reason may be that while
        in "Nausea" he indulged in a theoretical debate around the
        preoccupations of his existential philosophy, in "Roads to Freedom"
        he appears to be too pragmatic... i mean in a way it is all about
        how an existentialist actually "lives". Moreover "Nausea" elaborates
        the very basic ideas of Sartre's existential philosophy,
        whereas "Roads to Freedom" touches the other of his philosophical
        notions... such as "freedom, responsibility, engagement,and
        committment etc. Do inform regarding ur findings. take care --- In
        Sartre@yahoogroups.com, "scarey1917" <scarey1917@...> wrote:
        >
        > <<<<<<<<<<<<<<I wonder if u can guide me to some resources on
        Triology
        > (Age of Reason, The Reprieve,...>>>>>>>>>>>>
        >
        > I'm not an "expert" on Sartre's fiction, although I am just now
        > finishing up re-reading the second novel in the "Roads to Freedom"
        > trilogy, "The Reprieve." As in "The Age of Reason" the main
        character
        > is Mathieu Delarue who appears to be a stand-in for Sartre
        himself. He
        > seems to be the same age as Sartre, is a philosophy teacher,
        single -
        > but always involved with women, consumed with the issue of
        > his "freedom", and so on. The trilogy moves from the most intimate
        of
        > issues (Marcelle's unwanted pregnancy)and the place of indivudual
        > freedom, to the envelopment of that freedom by the crushing weight
        of
        > history. As the second book ends, Mathieu has been called up for
        > service in the French army, and is reporting for duty (things
        can't be
        > good when philosophers are being drafted!). I'm sure any library
        has
        > books on Sartre's fiction. There's an anthology called "Sartre: A
        > Collection of Critical Essays" that has material on his novels.
        >
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