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Re: [Sartre] Sarterian Gathering

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  • MITUL TRIVEDI
    i appreciate the thought. however, rather than making it an informal gathering, it would be more rewarding to organize a sort of seminar/workshop/conference on
    Message 1 of 10 , Mar 1 4:55 AM
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      i appreciate the thought. however, rather than making it an informal gathering, it would be more rewarding to organize a sort of seminar/workshop/conference on sartre. we can definitely organize it. if we all agree to have this event in england, my university will be happy to host it.

      thans.

      Mitul.

      khadim_soomro <khadim_soomro@...> wrote:

      Dear All

      I have a suggestion that their are lot of memberships of the groups
      than why we can not gather at a place to materialized sartre
      thoughts. Can we?

      Thanx

      Khadim Soomro






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    • Tommy Beavitt
      Sounds like an interesting idea. Which university is that? What would be a good date? Tommy
      Message 2 of 10 , Mar 1 5:19 AM
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        Sounds like an interesting idea. Which university is that? What would
        be a good date?

        Tommy

        On 1 Mar 2005, at 12:55, MITUL TRIVEDI wrote:

        >
        > i appreciate the thought. however, rather than making it an informal
        > gathering, it would be more rewarding to organize a sort of
        > seminar/workshop/conference on sartre. we can definitely organize it.
        > if we all agree to have this event in england, my university will be
        > happy to host it.
        >
        > thans.
        >
        > Mitul.
        >
        > khadim_soomro <khadim_soomro@...> wrote:
        >
        > Dear All
        >
        > I have a suggestion that their are lot of memberships of the groups
        > than why we can not gather at a place to materialized sartre
        > thoughts. Can we?
        >
        > Thanx
        >
        > Khadim Soomro
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        > To unsubscribe, e-mail: Sartre-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
        >
        >
        >
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        >
        >
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      • ziggysmane
        Hi guys. My name s Lou and I am definitely a fan of Jean-Paul Sartre and the existentialist movement. I have a B.A. in French and, since college, I have always
        Message 3 of 10 , Mar 8 12:35 AM
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          Hi guys. My name's Lou and I am definitely a fan of Jean-Paul Sartre
          and the existentialist movement. I have a B.A. in French and, since
          college, I have always been a fan of existentialism. I remember
          reading "La Chute", or "The Fall", by Albert Camus. The protagonist,
          or anti-hero,a lawyer, was for me at the time very shocking in his
          outlook on life. I thought he was a prick for losing his morals like
          that. It's been a while since I read it, but in one instance he lets
          this guy drown. I might be wrong, but I think that he was tired of
          society forcing their moral system on him. Maybe he was disillusioned
          by the false sense of "justice" the judicial system provided and he
          didn't want any part of it. I think he was just exercising his choice
          as a human being to not play the role. He accepted the responsibility
          for making that choice (not saving the drowning guy), that was a
          consequence of his freedom. Here, he is willing to accept other
          people's judgements and he doesn't give a fuck. As Sartre would
          say, "L'Enfer, c'est les autres.", or "Hell is other people's
          judgements, foul looks, comments," or whatever.
          i'm currently reading "L'Etranger" and I think it's a great book.
          I also have "L'Age de Raison" by Sartre in my possession, although i
          haven't read it yet. I admire the existentialists' world view which
          breaks away from conventional thinking. I think the world is too
          caught up in Judeo-Christian bullshit and other religious doctrine to
          think as free human beings. This is just my personal view, but I see
          no distinction between God and Man. If there is a deity, it's us. I
          don't believe in the Judeo-Christian-Islamic belief of an invisible
          Patriarch that punishes and rewards us based on our actions and
          prayers. These days, with everybody caught up in the spell of the
          Bush Administration and their Right-wing propaganda, people are
          refusing to use reason.
          Tomorrow I'm doing an oral presentation in my French class
          concerning Sartre and his philosophies. It will just be a five-minute
          dialogue with another student. I definitely want to join in on the
          existentialist discussion with you guys. I feel that it's every human
          being's duty to question established doctrine and challenge
          themselves. I've been reading the messages of the group and I'm kind
          of starting to get a grasp of it. Please, anybody, send me an e-mail
          with your complete thoughts. I live out here in California and I
          would love to read more detailed analyses of Sartre's views. I want
          to get more into detail about "L'Etranger", but I don't know if it's
          appropriate, being that this is a group whose discussions concern
          Sartre. But, in case you guys feel like it, you guys can e-mail me
          and we can discuss it.
          Tanx, Lou


          --- In Sartre@yahoogroups.com, MITUL TRIVEDI <isolatedsaggi@y...>
          wrote:
          > i appreciate the thought. however, rather than making it an
          informal gathering, it would be more rewarding to organize a sort of
          seminar/workshop/conference on sartre. we can definitely organize it.
          if we all agree to have this event in england, my university will be
          happy to host it.
          >
          > thans.
          >
          > Mitul.
          >
          > khadim_soomro <khadim_soomro@y...> wrote:
          >
          > Dear All
          >
          > I have a suggestion that their are lot of memberships of the groups
          > than why we can not gather at a place to materialized sartre
          > thoughts. Can we?
          >
          > Thanx
          >
          > Khadim Soomro
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          > To unsubscribe, e-mail: Sartre-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
          >
          >
          >
          > Yahoo! Groups SponsorADVERTISEMENT
          >
          >
          > ---------------------------------
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          >
          > To visit your group on the web, go to:
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          >
          > To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
          > Sartre-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
          >
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          Service.
          >
          >
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        • S S
          Hi! Its good to see a lot of interesting and intelligent discussion on Sartre s philosophy and I did happen to read his magnum opus Being and Nothingness
          Message 4 of 10 , Mar 8 3:12 AM
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            Hi!

            Its good to see a lot of interesting and intelligent discussion on Sartre's
            philosophy and I did happen to read his magnum opus "Being and Nothingness"
            years back.

            The cornerstone of his philosophy as I understood it was the phenomological
            exposition of Being-In-Itself.
            Taking the oft repeated example of a table existing in a room with an
            oberver.The "being" table leaps into the concsiousness of the observer.The
            observer at once grasps the being of the table its colour,grain etc and the
            fact that he could use it to say place a few books on it without
            differentiating these attributes consciously(A description would be akin to
            knowledge or quasi state of being).At the heart of this being "table"
            revealed to the free consciouness is that it in a second movement it
            nihilates itself as not "table".Hence at the heart of being is nihiliation.
            The table,the object, experiences no such nihiliation and is all fullness or
            inexhaustible being in that any observer how ever many times he percieves
            the table would have the same fullness of being percieved.
            This nihiliation is the being-for-iself and is the source of anguish of
            existentialism.In that the being in the world always tries to attain the
            permanance or fullness of the Being-In-Itself,like being a waiter,
            or being a doctor trying to lose one-self in that role,not having to make
            any other choice.It tries to escape in bad faith and cannot face up to
            itself as a free being constantly having to make choices.
            And because of nihiliation being at the heart of his existence it is
            therefore only in death that the constant struggle to escape its freedom
            ceases.

            What would happen to the Being-for-itself if it turns back upon itself and
            percieves itself as the ultimate value in relation to being.By disconnecting
            with the objective world of Being-In-Itself would it attain peace of the
            meditating monk or descend into madness to be locked up in a psychiatric
            ward.

            These are some of the questions which come to me in regard to the structures
            of being which Sartre has tried to explain in "Being and Nothingness"

            Sudhir.


            >From: "ziggysmane" <ziggysmane@...>
            >Reply-To: Sartre@yahoogroups.com
            >To: Sartre@yahoogroups.com
            >Subject: [Sartre] Re: Sarterian Gathering
            >Date: Tue, 08 Mar 2005 08:35:37 -0000
            >
            >
            >Hi guys. My name's Lou and I am definitely a fan of Jean-Paul Sartre
            >and the existentialist movement. I have a B.A. in French and, since
            >college, I have always been a fan of existentialism. I remember
            >reading "La Chute", or "The Fall", by Albert Camus. The protagonist,
            >or anti-hero,a lawyer, was for me at the time very shocking in his
            >outlook on life. I thought he was a prick for losing his morals like
            >that. It's been a while since I read it, but in one instance he lets
            >this guy drown. I might be wrong, but I think that he was tired of
            >society forcing their moral system on him. Maybe he was disillusioned
            >by the false sense of "justice" the judicial system provided and he
            >didn't want any part of it. I think he was just exercising his choice
            >as a human being to not play the role. He accepted the responsibility
            >for making that choice (not saving the drowning guy), that was a
            >consequence of his freedom. Here, he is willing to accept other
            >people's judgements and he doesn't give a fuck. As Sartre would
            >say, "L'Enfer, c'est les autres.", or "Hell is other people's
            >judgements, foul looks, comments," or whatever.
            > i'm currently reading "L'Etranger" and I think it's a great book.
            >I also have "L'Age de Raison" by Sartre in my possession, although i
            >haven't read it yet. I admire the existentialists' world view which
            >breaks away from conventional thinking. I think the world is too
            >caught up in Judeo-Christian bullshit and other religious doctrine to
            >think as free human beings. This is just my personal view, but I see
            >no distinction between God and Man. If there is a deity, it's us. I
            >don't believe in the Judeo-Christian-Islamic belief of an invisible
            >Patriarch that punishes and rewards us based on our actions and
            >prayers. These days, with everybody caught up in the spell of the
            >Bush Administration and their Right-wing propaganda, people are
            >refusing to use reason.
            > Tomorrow I'm doing an oral presentation in my French class
            >concerning Sartre and his philosophies. It will just be a five-minute
            >dialogue with another student. I definitely want to join in on the
            >existentialist discussion with you guys. I feel that it's every human
            >being's duty to question established doctrine and challenge
            >themselves. I've been reading the messages of the group and I'm kind
            >of starting to get a grasp of it. Please, anybody, send me an e-mail
            >with your complete thoughts. I live out here in California and I
            >would love to read more detailed analyses of Sartre's views. I want
            >to get more into detail about "L'Etranger", but I don't know if it's
            >appropriate, being that this is a group whose discussions concern
            >Sartre. But, in case you guys feel like it, you guys can e-mail me
            >and we can discuss it.
            > Tanx, Lou
            >
            >
            >--- In Sartre@yahoogroups.com, MITUL TRIVEDI <isolatedsaggi@y...>
            >wrote:
            > > i appreciate the thought. however, rather than making it an
            >informal gathering, it would be more rewarding to organize a sort of
            >seminar/workshop/conference on sartre. we can definitely organize it.
            >if we all agree to have this event in england, my university will be
            >happy to host it.
            > >
            > > thans.
            > >
            > > Mitul.
            > >
            > > khadim_soomro <khadim_soomro@y...> wrote:
            > >
            > > Dear All
            > >
            > > I have a suggestion that their are lot of memberships of the groups
            > > than why we can not gather at a place to materialized sartre
            > > thoughts. Can we?
            > >
            > > Thanx
            > >
            > > Khadim Soomro
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > > To unsubscribe, e-mail: Sartre-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > > Yahoo! Groups SponsorADVERTISEMENT
            > >
            > >
            > > ---------------------------------
            > > Yahoo! Groups Links
            > >
            > > To visit your group on the web, go to:
            > > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Sartre/
            > >
            > > To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
            > > Sartre-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
            > >
            > > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the Yahoo! Terms of
            >Service.
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > > ---------------------------------
            > > Yahoo! Messenger - Communicate instantly..."Ping" your friends
            >today! Download Messenger Now
            > >
            > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            >
            >
            >

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          • Lou Eugene
            What s up Sudhir! I definitely have to read Being and Nothingness or L Etre et le Neant to get a better grasp of what you are talking about. I m still a
            Message 5 of 10 , Mar 8 10:41 PM
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              What's up Sudhir! I definitely have to read "Being and Nothingness" or "L'Etre et le Neant" to get a better grasp of what you are talking about. I'm still a little foggy on being-for-itself and being-in-itself. I'm going to do some research on the net to get the gist of it. Not to get off the subject, but like I said before I'm reading "L'Etranger". It's a pretty interesting novel in that the anti-hero is sort of disconnected from the world. It's an extreme example of a guy not bound to society by the choices he makes. I kind of understand what you're saying when you say that people try to lose themselves in their careers or bullshit jobs so they won't have to make tough choices. But this guy, Monsieur Mersault, is making choices that could be considered to be way off the mainstream. He doesn't feel compelled by society to love anybody: not his mother, who died, not even his longtime lover. He's stuck at a dead-end job, yet he seems to be more free than most "successful" people with
              their perfect careers, or even people who are supposedly "in love". He told his lover like ten times that he didn't love her and he never visited his mother in her retirement home. His boss told him he was a loser for not wanting to change positions and move to Paris like any other young man would. "Un changement de vie", or a change of lifestyle, still woudn't fulfill him. I think it's here that Camus demonstrates the absurdity of life. This guy makes his decisions and he seems to be content with himself despite anybody else's judgement. There are other great examples of the philosophy in this book, but it would take up too much space and time to explain. I want to continue learning about existentialism in order to discuss it in a more detailed fashion. Keep sending e-mails man!!!!
              Lou


              Hi!

              Its good to see a lot of interesting and intelligent discussion on Sartre's
              philosophy and I did happen to read his magnum opus "Being and Nothingness"
              years back.

              The cornerstone of his philosophy as I understood it was the phenomological
              exposition of Being-In-Itself.
              Taking the oft repeated example of a table existing in a room with an
              oberver.The "being" table leaps into the concsiousness of the observer.The
              observer at once grasps the being of the table its colour,grain etc and the
              fact that he could use it to say place a few books on it without
              differentiating these attributes consciously(A description would be akin to
              knowledge or quasi state of being).At the heart of this being "table"
              revealed to the free consciouness is that it in a second movement it
              nihilates itself as not "table".Hence at the heart of being is nihiliation.
              The table,the object, experiences no such nihiliation and is all fullness or
              inexhaustible being in that any observer how ever many times he percieves
              the table would have the same fullness of being percieved.
              This nihiliation is the being-for-iself and is the source of anguish of
              existentialism.In that the being in the world always tries to attain the
              permanance or fullness of the Being-In-Itself,like being a waiter,
              or being a doctor trying to lose one-self in that role,not having to make
              any other choice.It tries to escape in bad faith and cannot face up to
              itself as a free being constantly having to make choices.
              And because of nihiliation being at the heart of his existence it is
              therefore only in death that the constant struggle to escape its freedom
              ceases.

              What would happen to the Being-for-itself if it turns back upon itself and
              percieves itself as the ultimate value in relation to being.By disconnecting
              with the objective world of Being-In-Itself would it attain peace of the
              meditating monk or descend into madness to be locked up in a psychiatric
              ward.

              These are some of the questions which come to me in regard to the structures
              of being which Sartre has tried to explain in "Being and Nothingness"

              Sudhir.


              >From: "ziggysmane" <ziggysmane@...>
              >Reply-To: Sartre@yahoogroups.com
              >To: Sartre@yahoogroups.com
              >Subject: [Sartre] Re: Sarterian Gathering
              >Date: Tue, 08 Mar 2005 08:35:37 -0000
              >
              >
              >Hi guys. My name's Lou and I am definitely a fan of Jean-Paul Sartre
              >and the existentialist movement. I have a B.A. in French and, since
              >college, I have always been a fan of existentialism. I remember
              >reading "La Chute", or "The Fall", by Albert Camus. The protagonist,
              >or anti-hero,a lawyer, was for me at the time very shocking in his
              >outlook on life. I thought he was a prick for losing his morals like
              >that. It's been a while since I read it, but in one instance he lets
              >this guy drown. I might be wrong, but I think that he was tired of
              >society forcing their moral system on him. Maybe he was disillusioned
              >by the false sense of "justice" the judicial system provided and he
              >didn't want any part of it. I think he was just exercising his choice
              >as a human being to not play the role. He accepted the responsibility
              >for making that choice (not saving the drowning guy), that was a
              >consequence of his freedom. Here, he is willing to accept other
              >people's judgements and he doesn't give a fuck. As Sartre would
              >say, "L'Enfer, c'est les autres.", or "Hell is other people's
              >judgements, foul looks, comments," or whatever.
              > i'm currently reading "L'Etranger" and I think it's a great book.
              >I also have "L'Age de Raison" by Sartre in my possession, although i
              >haven't read it yet. I admire the existentialists' world view which
              >breaks away from conventional thinking. I think the world is too
              >caught up in Judeo-Christian bullshit and other religious doctrine to
              >think as free human beings. This is just my personal view, but I see
              >no distinction between God and Man. If there is a deity, it's us. I
              >don't believe in the Judeo-Christian-Islamic belief of an invisible
              >Patriarch that punishes and rewards us based on our actions and
              >prayers. These days, with everybody caught up in the spell of the
              >Bush Administration and their Right-wing propaganda, people are
              >refusing to use reason.
              > Tomorrow I'm doing an oral presentation in my French class
              >concerning Sartre and his philosophies. It will just be a five-minute
              >dialogue with another student. I definitely want to join in on the
              >existentialist discussion with you guys. I feel that it's every human
              >being's duty to question established doctrine and challenge
              >themselves. I've been reading the messages of the group and I'm kind
              >of starting to get a grasp of it. Please, anybody, send me an e-mail
              >with your complete thoughts. I live out here in California and I
              >would love to read more detailed analyses of Sartre's views. I want
              >to get more into detail about "L'Etranger", but I don't know if it's
              >appropriate, being that this is a group whose discussions concern
              >Sartre. But, in case you guys feel like it, you guys can e-mail me
              >and we can discuss it.
              > Tanx, Lou
              >
              >
              >--- In Sartre@yahoogroups.com, MITUL TRIVEDI <isolatedsaggi@y...>
              >wrote:
              > > i appreciate the thought. however, rather than making it an
              >informal gathering, it would be more rewarding to organize a sort of
              >seminar/workshop/conference on sartre. we can definitely organize it.
              >if we all agree to have this event in england, my university will be
              >happy to host it.
              > >
              > > thans.
              > >
              > > Mitul.
              > >
              > > khadim_soomro <khadim_soomro@y...> wrote:
              > >
              > > Dear All
              > >
              > > I have a suggestion that their are lot of memberships of the groups
              > > than why we can not gather at a place to materialized sartre
              > > thoughts. Can we?
              > >
              > > Thanx
              > >
              > > Khadim Soomro
              > >
              > >
              > >
              > >
              > >
              > >
              > > To unsubscribe, e-mail: Sartre-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
              > >
              > >
              > >
              > > Yahoo! Groups SponsorADVERTISEMENT
              > >
              > >
              > > ---------------------------------
              > > Yahoo! Groups Links
              > >
              > > To visit your group on the web, go to:
              > > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Sartre/
              > >
              > > To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
              > > Sartre-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
              > >
              > > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the Yahoo! Terms of
              >Service.
              > >
              > >
              > >
              > > ---------------------------------
              > > Yahoo! Messenger - Communicate instantly..."Ping" your friends
              >today! Download Messenger Now
              > >
              > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              >
              >
              >

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            • Avani Vora
              Hey My name is Avani, I joined this group because I am very interested in Sartre. I don t know much about or Sartre or I guess I would say life in general,
              Message 6 of 10 , Mar 9 7:16 PM
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                Hey
                My name is Avani, I joined this group because I am very interested in Sartre. I don't know much about or Sartre or I guess I would say life in general, but thats why I joined so I could understand something. This is very interesting being a part of this group and reading the arguments and facts, so I just thought I would say hey even though I have no idea who I am really saying 'hey' to and ya I feel kind of crazy doing this even though its not really crazy. I'm from Iowa by the way.

                Lou Eugene <ziggysmane@...> wrote:
                What's up Sudhir! I definitely have to read "Being and Nothingness" or "L'Etre et le Neant" to get a better grasp of what you are talking about. I'm still a little foggy on being-for-itself and being-in-itself. I'm going to do some research on the net to get the gist of it. Not to get off the subject, but like I said before I'm reading "L'Etranger". It's a pretty interesting novel in that the anti-hero is sort of disconnected from the world. It's an extreme example of a guy not bound to society by the choices he makes. I kind of understand what you're saying when you say that people try to lose themselves in their careers or bullshit jobs so they won't have to make tough choices. But this guy, Monsieur Mersault, is making choices that could be considered to be way off the mainstream. He doesn't feel compelled by society to love anybody: not his mother, who died, not even his longtime lover. He's stuck at a dead-end job, yet he seems to be more free than most "successful" people with
                their perfect careers, or even people who are supposedly "in love". He told his lover like ten times that he didn't love her and he never visited his mother in her retirement home. His boss told him he was a loser for not wanting to change positions and move to Paris like any other young man would. "Un changement de vie", or a change of lifestyle, still woudn't fulfill him. I think it's here that Camus demonstrates the absurdity of life. This guy makes his decisions and he seems to be content with himself despite anybody else's judgement. There are other great examples of the philosophy in this book, but it would take up too much space and time to explain. I want to continue learning about existentialism in order to discuss it in a more detailed fashion. Keep sending e-mails man!!!!
                Lou


                Hi!

                Its good to see a lot of interesting and intelligent discussion on Sartre's
                philosophy and I did happen to read his magnum opus "Being and Nothingness"
                years back.

                The cornerstone of his philosophy as I understood it was the phenomological
                exposition of Being-In-Itself.
                Taking the oft repeated example of a table existing in a room with an
                oberver.The "being" table leaps into the concsiousness of the observer.The
                observer at once grasps the being of the table its colour,grain etc and the
                fact that he could use it to say place a few books on it without
                differentiating these attributes consciously(A description would be akin to
                knowledge or quasi state of being).At the heart of this being "table"
                revealed to the free consciouness is that it in a second movement it
                nihilates itself as not "table".Hence at the heart of being is nihiliation.
                The table,the object, experiences no such nihiliation and is all fullness or
                inexhaustible being in that any observer how ever many times he percieves
                the table would have the same fullness of being percieved.
                This nihiliation is the being-for-iself and is the source of anguish of
                existentialism.In that the being in the world always tries to attain the
                permanance or fullness of the Being-In-Itself,like being a waiter,
                or being a doctor trying to lose one-self in that role,not having to make
                any other choice.It tries to escape in bad faith and cannot face up to
                itself as a free being constantly having to make choices.
                And because of nihiliation being at the heart of his existence it is
                therefore only in death that the constant struggle to escape its freedom
                ceases.

                What would happen to the Being-for-itself if it turns back upon itself and
                percieves itself as the ultimate value in relation to being.By disconnecting
                with the objective world of Being-In-Itself would it attain peace of the
                meditating monk or descend into madness to be locked up in a psychiatric
                ward.

                These are some of the questions which come to me in regard to the structures
                of being which Sartre has tried to explain in "Being and Nothingness"

                Sudhir.


                >From: "ziggysmane" <ziggysmane@...>
                >Reply-To: Sartre@yahoogroups.com
                >To: Sartre@yahoogroups.com
                >Subject: [Sartre] Re: Sarterian Gathering
                >Date: Tue, 08 Mar 2005 08:35:37 -0000
                >
                >
                >Hi guys. My name's Lou and I am definitely a fan of Jean-Paul Sartre
                >and the existentialist movement. I have a B.A. in French and, since
                >college, I have always been a fan of existentialism. I remember
                >reading "La Chute", or "The Fall", by Albert Camus. The protagonist,
                >or anti-hero,a lawyer, was for me at the time very shocking in his
                >outlook on life. I thought he was a prick for losing his morals like
                >that. It's been a while since I read it, but in one instance he lets
                >this guy drown. I might be wrong, but I think that he was tired of
                >society forcing their moral system on him. Maybe he was disillusioned
                >by the false sense of "justice" the judicial system provided and he
                >didn't want any part of it. I think he was just exercising his choice
                >as a human being to not play the role. He accepted the responsibility
                >for making that choice (not saving the drowning guy), that was a
                >consequence of his freedom. Here, he is willing to accept other
                >people's judgements and he doesn't give a fuck. As Sartre would
                >say, "L'Enfer, c'est les autres.", or "Hell is other people's
                >judgements, foul looks, comments," or whatever.
                > i'm currently reading "L'Etranger" and I think it's a great book.
                >I also have "L'Age de Raison" by Sartre in my possession, although i
                >haven't read it yet. I admire the existentialists' world view which
                >breaks away from conventional thinking. I think the world is too
                >caught up in Judeo-Christian bullshit and other religious doctrine to
                >think as free human beings. This is just my personal view, but I see
                >no distinction between God and Man. If there is a deity, it's us. I
                >don't believe in the Judeo-Christian-Islamic belief of an invisible
                >Patriarch that punishes and rewards us based on our actions and
                >prayers. These days, with everybody caught up in the spell of the
                >Bush Administration and their Right-wing propaganda, people are
                >refusing to use reason.
                > Tomorrow I'm doing an oral presentation in my French class
                >concerning Sartre and his philosophies. It will just be a five-minute
                >dialogue with another student. I definitely want to join in on the
                >existentialist discussion with you guys. I feel that it's every human
                >being's duty to question established doctrine and challenge
                >themselves. I've been reading the messages of the group and I'm kind
                >of starting to get a grasp of it. Please, anybody, send me an e-mail
                >with your complete thoughts. I live out here in California and I
                >would love to read more detailed analyses of Sartre's views. I want
                >to get more into detail about "L'Etranger", but I don't know if it's
                >appropriate, being that this is a group whose discussions concern
                >Sartre. But, in case you guys feel like it, you guys can e-mail me
                >and we can discuss it.
                > Tanx, Lou
                >
                >
                >--- In Sartre@yahoogroups.com, MITUL TRIVEDI <isolatedsaggi@y...>
                >wrote:
                > > i appreciate the thought. however, rather than making it an
                >informal gathering, it would be more rewarding to organize a sort of
                >seminar/workshop/conference on sartre. we can definitely organize it.
                >if we all agree to have this event in england, my university will be
                >happy to host it.
                > >
                > > thans.
                > >
                > > Mitul.
                > >
                > > khadim_soomro <khadim_soomro@y...> wrote:
                > >
                > > Dear All
                > >
                > > I have a suggestion that their are lot of memberships of the groups
                > > than why we can not gather at a place to materialized sartre
                > > thoughts. Can we?
                > >
                > > Thanx
                > >
                > > Khadim Soomro
                > >
                > >
                > >
                > >
                > >
                > >
                > > To unsubscribe, e-mail: Sartre-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
                > >
                > >
                > >
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              • asghar soomro
                Dear all, Sorry in advance for question I am asking which is not direclty linked to ongoing discussions: Can we design point for action in order to combat
                Message 7 of 10 , Mar 10 10:59 PM
                • 0 Attachment
                  Dear all,

                  Sorry in advance for question I am asking which is not
                  direclty linked to ongoing discussions: Can we design
                  point for action in order to combat social evils,
                  ruining alomst everything in the light of Satre work?
                  I am afraid we, intersted in philosopgy spend
                  ample(big part of tife) in understaind and discussing,
                  so it is need of hour to understand our own psychology
                  of inertia. I am presuming all of you have been just
                  discussing, so far none of us been proactive in
                  protesting and condemning those who violating rights
                  of oppressed. I think that we are not linking Sartre
                  work to present conditions of the world.i will be
                  writing to you more .
                  All the best
                  Asghar
                  --- Avani Vora <ONIAVANI@...> wrote:

                  > Hey
                  > My name is Avani, I joined this group because I am
                  > very interested in Sartre. I don't know much about
                  > or Sartre or I guess I would say life in general,
                  > but thats why I joined so I could understand
                  > something. This is very interesting being a part of
                  > this group and reading the arguments and facts, so I
                  > just thought I would say hey even though I have no
                  > idea who I am really saying 'hey' to and ya I feel
                  > kind of crazy doing this even though its not really
                  > crazy. I'm from Iowa by the way.
                  >
                  > Lou Eugene <ziggysmane@...> wrote:
                  > What's up Sudhir! I definitely have to read "Being
                  > and Nothingness" or "L'Etre et le Neant" to get a
                  > better grasp of what you are talking about. I'm
                  > still a little foggy on being-for-itself and
                  > being-in-itself. I'm going to do some research on
                  > the net to get the gist of it. Not to get off the
                  > subject, but like I said before I'm reading
                  > "L'Etranger". It's a pretty interesting novel in
                  > that the anti-hero is sort of disconnected from the
                  > world. It's an extreme example of a guy not bound to
                  > society by the choices he makes. I kind of
                  > understand what you're saying when you say that
                  > people try to lose themselves in their careers or
                  > bullshit jobs so they won't have to make tough
                  > choices. But this guy, Monsieur Mersault, is making
                  > choices that could be considered to be way off the
                  > mainstream. He doesn't feel compelled by society to
                  > love anybody: not his mother, who died, not even his
                  > longtime lover. He's stuck at a dead-end job, yet he
                  > seems to be more free than most "successful" people
                  > with
                  > their perfect careers, or even people who are
                  > supposedly "in love". He told his lover like ten
                  > times that he didn't love her and he never visited
                  > his mother in her retirement home. His boss told him
                  > he was a loser for not wanting to change positions
                  > and move to Paris like any other young man would.
                  > "Un changement de vie", or a change of lifestyle,
                  > still woudn't fulfill him. I think it's here that
                  > Camus demonstrates the absurdity of life. This guy
                  > makes his decisions and he seems to be content with
                  > himself despite anybody else's judgement. There are
                  > other great examples of the philosophy in this book,
                  > but it would take up too much space and time to
                  > explain. I want to continue learning about
                  > existentialism in order to discuss it in a more
                  > detailed fashion. Keep sending e-mails man!!!!
                  > Lou
                  >
                  >
                  > Hi!
                  >
                  > Its good to see a lot of interesting and intelligent
                  > discussion on Sartre's
                  > philosophy and I did happen to read his magnum opus
                  > "Being and Nothingness"
                  > years back.
                  >
                  > The cornerstone of his philosophy as I understood it
                  > was the phenomological
                  > exposition of Being-In-Itself.
                  > Taking the oft repeated example of a table existing
                  > in a room with an
                  > oberver.The "being" table leaps into the
                  > concsiousness of the observer.The
                  > observer at once grasps the being of the table its
                  > colour,grain etc and the
                  > fact that he could use it to say place a few books
                  > on it without
                  > differentiating these attributes consciously(A
                  > description would be akin to
                  > knowledge or quasi state of being).At the heart of
                  > this being "table"
                  > revealed to the free consciouness is that it in a
                  > second movement it
                  > nihilates itself as not "table".Hence at the heart
                  > of being is nihiliation.
                  > The table,the object, experiences no such
                  > nihiliation and is all fullness or
                  > inexhaustible being in that any observer how ever
                  > many times he percieves
                  > the table would have the same fullness of being
                  > percieved.
                  > This nihiliation is the being-for-iself and is the
                  > source of anguish of
                  > existentialism.In that the being in the world always
                  > tries to attain the
                  > permanance or fullness of the Being-In-Itself,like
                  > being a waiter,
                  > or being a doctor trying to lose one-self in that
                  > role,not having to make
                  > any other choice.It tries to escape in bad faith and
                  > cannot face up to
                  > itself as a free being constantly having to make
                  > choices.
                  > And because of nihiliation being at the heart of his
                  > existence it is
                  > therefore only in death that the constant struggle
                  > to escape its freedom
                  > ceases.
                  >
                  > What would happen to the Being-for-itself if it
                  > turns back upon itself and
                  > percieves itself as the ultimate value in relation
                  > to being.By disconnecting
                  > with the objective world of Being-In-Itself would it
                  > attain peace of the
                  > meditating monk or descend into madness to be locked
                  > up in a psychiatric
                  > ward.
                  >
                  > These are some of the questions which come to me in
                  > regard to the structures
                  > of being which Sartre has tried to explain in "Being
                  > and Nothingness"
                  >
                  > Sudhir.
                  >
                  >
                  > >From: "ziggysmane" <ziggysmane@...>
                  > >Reply-To: Sartre@yahoogroups.com
                  > >To: Sartre@yahoogroups.com
                  > >Subject: [Sartre] Re: Sarterian Gathering
                  > >Date: Tue, 08 Mar 2005 08:35:37 -0000
                  > >
                  > >
                  > >Hi guys. My name's Lou and I am definitely a fan of
                  > Jean-Paul Sartre
                  > >and the existentialist movement. I have a B.A. in
                  > French and, since
                  > >college, I have always been a fan of
                  > existentialism. I remember
                  > >reading "La Chute", or "The Fall", by Albert Camus.
                  > The protagonist,
                  > >or anti-hero,a lawyer, was for me at the time very
                  > shocking in his
                  > >outlook on life. I thought he was a prick for
                  > losing his morals like
                  > >that. It's been a while since I read it, but in one
                  > instance he lets
                  > >this guy drown. I might be wrong, but I think that
                  > he was tired of
                  > >society forcing their moral system on him. Maybe he
                  > was disillusioned
                  > >by the false sense of "justice" the judicial system
                  > provided and he
                  > >didn't want any part of it. I think he was just
                  > exercising his choice
                  > >as a human being to not play the role. He accepted
                  > the responsibility
                  > >for making that choice (not saving the drowning
                  > guy), that was a
                  > >consequence of his freedom. Here, he is willing to
                  > accept other
                  > >people's judgements and he doesn't give a fuck. As
                  > Sartre would
                  > >say, "L'Enfer, c'est les autres.", or "Hell is
                  > other people's
                  > >judgements, foul looks, comments," or whatever.
                  > > i'm currently reading "L'Etranger" and I think
                  > it's a great book.
                  > >I also have "L'Age de Raison" by Sartre in my
                  > possession, although i
                  > >haven't read it yet. I admire the existentialists'
                  > world view which
                  > >breaks away from conventional thinking. I think the
                  > world is too
                  > >caught up in Judeo-Christian bullshit and other
                  > religious doctrine to
                  > >think as free human beings. This is just my
                  > personal view, but I see
                  > >no distinction between God and Man. If there is a
                  > deity, it's us. I
                  > >don't believe in the Judeo-Christian-Islamic belief
                  > of an invisible
                  > >Patriarch that punishes and rewards us based on our
                  > actions and
                  > >prayers. These days, with everybody caught up in
                  > the spell of the
                  > >Bush Administration and their Right-wing
                  > propaganda, people are
                  > >refusing to use reason.
                  > > Tomorrow I'm doing an oral presentation in my
                  > French class
                  > >concerning Sartre and his philosophies. It will
                  > just be a five-minute
                  > >dialogue with another student. I definitely want to
                  > join in on the
                  > >existentialist discussion with you guys. I feel
                  > that it's every human
                  > >being's duty to question established doctrine and
                  > challenge
                  > >themselves. I've been reading the messages of the
                  > group and I'm kind
                  > >of starting to get a grasp of it. Please, anybody,
                  > send me an e-mail
                  > >with your complete thoughts. I live out here in
                  > California and I
                  >
                  === message truncated ===




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                • fntsy_wrld
                  I agree with Mr. Soomro.The Psychological correlates of his structures of being should be explored to study problems like suicidal tendencies/drug-alcohol
                  Message 8 of 10 , Mar 11 10:41 PM
                  • 0 Attachment
                    I agree with Mr. Soomro.The Psychological correlates of his
                    structures of being should be explored to study problems like
                    suicidal tendencies/drug-alcohol abuse or social evils.
                    Maybe the Sartrean gathering could explore this topic.

                    Sudhir.


                    --- In Sartre@yahoogroups.com, asghar soomro <g_asgharsoomro@y...>
                    wrote:
                    > Dear all,
                    >
                    > Sorry in advance for question I am asking which is not
                    > direclty linked to ongoing discussions: Can we design
                    > point for action in order to combat social evils,
                    > ruining alomst everything in the light of Satre work?
                    > I am afraid we, intersted in philosopgy spend
                    > ample(big part of tife) in understaind and discussing,
                    > so it is need of hour to understand our own psychology
                    > of inertia. I am presuming all of you have been just
                    > discussing, so far none of us been proactive in
                    > protesting and condemning those who violating rights
                    > of oppressed. I think that we are not linking Sartre
                    > work to present conditions of the world.i will be
                    > writing to you more .
                    > All the best
                    > Asghar
                    > --- Avani Vora <ONIAVANI@Y...> wrote:
                    >
                    > > Hey
                    > > My name is Avani, I joined this group because I am
                    > > very interested in Sartre. I don't know much about
                    > > or Sartre or I guess I would say life in general,
                    > > but thats why I joined so I could understand
                    > > something. This is very interesting being a part of
                    > > this group and reading the arguments and facts, so I
                    > > just thought I would say hey even though I have no
                    > > idea who I am really saying 'hey' to and ya I feel
                    > > kind of crazy doing this even though its not really
                    > > crazy. I'm from Iowa by the way.
                    > >
                    > > Lou Eugene <ziggysmane@y...> wrote:
                    > > What's up Sudhir! I definitely have to read "Being
                    > > and Nothingness" or "L'Etre et le Neant" to get a
                    > > better grasp of what you are talking about. I'm
                    > > still a little foggy on being-for-itself and
                    > > being-in-itself. I'm going to do some research on
                    > > the net to get the gist of it. Not to get off the
                    > > subject, but like I said before I'm reading
                    > > "L'Etranger". It's a pretty interesting novel in
                    > > that the anti-hero is sort of disconnected from the
                    > > world. It's an extreme example of a guy not bound to
                    > > society by the choices he makes. I kind of
                    > > understand what you're saying when you say that
                    > > people try to lose themselves in their careers or
                    > > bullshit jobs so they won't have to make tough
                    > > choices. But this guy, Monsieur Mersault, is making
                    > > choices that could be considered to be way off the
                    > > mainstream. He doesn't feel compelled by society to
                    > > love anybody: not his mother, who died, not even his
                    > > longtime lover. He's stuck at a dead-end job, yet he
                    > > seems to be more free than most "successful" people
                    > > with
                    > > their perfect careers, or even people who are
                    > > supposedly "in love". He told his lover like ten
                    > > times that he didn't love her and he never visited
                    > > his mother in her retirement home. His boss told him
                    > > he was a loser for not wanting to change positions
                    > > and move to Paris like any other young man would.
                    > > "Un changement de vie", or a change of lifestyle,
                    > > still woudn't fulfill him. I think it's here that
                    > > Camus demonstrates the absurdity of life. This guy
                    > > makes his decisions and he seems to be content with
                    > > himself despite anybody else's judgement. There are
                    > > other great examples of the philosophy in this book,
                    > > but it would take up too much space and time to
                    > > explain. I want to continue learning about
                    > > existentialism in order to discuss it in a more
                    > > detailed fashion. Keep sending e-mails man!!!!
                    > > Lou
                    > >
                    > >
                    > > Hi!
                    > >
                    > > Its good to see a lot of interesting and intelligent
                    > > discussion on Sartre's
                    > > philosophy and I did happen to read his magnum opus
                    > > "Being and Nothingness"
                    > > years back.
                    > >
                    > > The cornerstone of his philosophy as I understood it
                    > > was the phenomological
                    > > exposition of Being-In-Itself.
                    > > Taking the oft repeated example of a table existing
                    > > in a room with an
                    > > oberver.The "being" table leaps into the
                    > > concsiousness of the observer.The
                    > > observer at once grasps the being of the table its
                    > > colour,grain etc and the
                    > > fact that he could use it to say place a few books
                    > > on it without
                    > > differentiating these attributes consciously(A
                    > > description would be akin to
                    > > knowledge or quasi state of being).At the heart of
                    > > this being "table"
                    > > revealed to the free consciouness is that it in a
                    > > second movement it
                    > > nihilates itself as not "table".Hence at the heart
                    > > of being is nihiliation.
                    > > The table,the object, experiences no such
                    > > nihiliation and is all fullness or
                    > > inexhaustible being in that any observer how ever
                    > > many times he percieves
                    > > the table would have the same fullness of being
                    > > percieved.
                    > > This nihiliation is the being-for-iself and is the
                    > > source of anguish of
                    > > existentialism.In that the being in the world always
                    > > tries to attain the
                    > > permanance or fullness of the Being-In-Itself,like
                    > > being a waiter,
                    > > or being a doctor trying to lose one-self in that
                    > > role,not having to make
                    > > any other choice.It tries to escape in bad faith and
                    > > cannot face up to
                    > > itself as a free being constantly having to make
                    > > choices.
                    > > And because of nihiliation being at the heart of his
                    > > existence it is
                    > > therefore only in death that the constant struggle
                    > > to escape its freedom
                    > > ceases.
                    > >
                    > > What would happen to the Being-for-itself if it
                    > > turns back upon itself and
                    > > percieves itself as the ultimate value in relation
                    > > to being.By disconnecting
                    > > with the objective world of Being-In-Itself would it
                    > > attain peace of the
                    > > meditating monk or descend into madness to be locked
                    > > up in a psychiatric
                    > > ward.
                    > >
                    > > These are some of the questions which come to me in
                    > > regard to the structures
                    > > of being which Sartre has tried to explain in "Being
                    > > and Nothingness"
                    > >
                    > > Sudhir.
                    > >
                    > >
                    > > >From: "ziggysmane" <ziggysmane@y...>
                    > > >Reply-To: Sartre@yahoogroups.com
                    > > >To: Sartre@yahoogroups.com
                    > > >Subject: [Sartre] Re: Sarterian Gathering
                    > > >Date: Tue, 08 Mar 2005 08:35:37 -0000
                    > > >
                    > > >
                    > > >Hi guys. My name's Lou and I am definitely a fan of
                    > > Jean-Paul Sartre
                    > > >and the existentialist movement. I have a B.A. in
                    > > French and, since
                    > > >college, I have always been a fan of
                    > > existentialism. I remember
                    > > >reading "La Chute", or "The Fall", by Albert Camus.
                    > > The protagonist,
                    > > >or anti-hero,a lawyer, was for me at the time very
                    > > shocking in his
                    > > >outlook on life. I thought he was a prick for
                    > > losing his morals like
                    > > >that. It's been a while since I read it, but in one
                    > > instance he lets
                    > > >this guy drown. I might be wrong, but I think that
                    > > he was tired of
                    > > >society forcing their moral system on him. Maybe he
                    > > was disillusioned
                    > > >by the false sense of "justice" the judicial system
                    > > provided and he
                    > > >didn't want any part of it. I think he was just
                    > > exercising his choice
                    > > >as a human being to not play the role. He accepted
                    > > the responsibility
                    > > >for making that choice (not saving the drowning
                    > > guy), that was a
                    > > >consequence of his freedom. Here, he is willing to
                    > > accept other
                    > > >people's judgements and he doesn't give a fuck. As
                    > > Sartre would
                    > > >say, "L'Enfer, c'est les autres.", or "Hell is
                    > > other people's
                    > > >judgements, foul looks, comments," or whatever.
                    > > > i'm currently reading "L'Etranger" and I think
                    > > it's a great book.
                    > > >I also have "L'Age de Raison" by Sartre in my
                    > > possession, although i
                    > > >haven't read it yet. I admire the existentialists'
                    > > world view which
                    > > >breaks away from conventional thinking. I think the
                    > > world is too
                    > > >caught up in Judeo-Christian bullshit and other
                    > > religious doctrine to
                    > > >think as free human beings. This is just my
                    > > personal view, but I see
                    > > >no distinction between God and Man. If there is a
                    > > deity, it's us. I
                    > > >don't believe in the Judeo-Christian-Islamic belief
                    > > of an invisible
                    > > >Patriarch that punishes and rewards us based on our
                    > > actions and
                    > > >prayers. These days, with everybody caught up in
                    > > the spell of the
                    > > >Bush Administration and their Right-wing
                    > > propaganda, people are
                    > > >refusing to use reason.
                    > > > Tomorrow I'm doing an oral presentation in my
                    > > French class
                    > > >concerning Sartre and his philosophies. It will
                    > > just be a five-minute
                    > > >dialogue with another student. I definitely want to
                    > > join in on the
                    > > >existentialist discussion with you guys. I feel
                    > > that it's every human
                    > > >being's duty to question established doctrine and
                    > > challenge
                    > > >themselves. I've been reading the messages of the
                    > > group and I'm kind
                    > > >of starting to get a grasp of it. Please, anybody,
                    > > send me an e-mail
                    > > >with your complete thoughts. I live out here in
                    > > California and I
                    > >
                    > === message truncated ===
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
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                  • asghar soomro
                    Thank you very much for further explaining my suggestion. Can we take this discussion forward? Asghar ... === message truncated ===
                    Message 9 of 10 , Mar 15 11:33 PM
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                      Thank you very much for further explaining my
                      suggestion. Can we take this discussion forward?

                      Asghar
                      --- fntsy_wrld <fntsy_wrld@...> wrote:

                      >
                      > I agree with Mr. Soomro.The Psychological correlates
                      > of his
                      > structures of being should be explored to study
                      > problems like
                      > suicidal tendencies/drug-alcohol abuse or social
                      > evils.
                      > Maybe the Sartrean gathering could explore this
                      > topic.
                      >
                      > Sudhir.
                      >
                      >
                      > --- In Sartre@yahoogroups.com, asghar soomro
                      > <g_asgharsoomro@y...>
                      > wrote:
                      > > Dear all,
                      > >
                      > > Sorry in advance for question I am asking which is
                      > not
                      > > direclty linked to ongoing discussions: Can we
                      > design
                      > > point for action in order to combat social evils,
                      > > ruining alomst everything in the light of Satre
                      > work?
                      > > I am afraid we, intersted in philosopgy spend
                      > > ample(big part of tife) in understaind and
                      > discussing,
                      > > so it is need of hour to understand our own
                      > psychology
                      > > of inertia. I am presuming all of you have been
                      > just
                      > > discussing, so far none of us been proactive in
                      > > protesting and condemning those who violating
                      > rights
                      > > of oppressed. I think that we are not linking
                      > Sartre
                      > > work to present conditions of the world.i will be
                      > > writing to you more .
                      > > All the best
                      > > Asghar
                      > > --- Avani Vora <ONIAVANI@Y...> wrote:
                      > >
                      > > > Hey
                      > > > My name is Avani, I joined this group because I
                      > am
                      > > > very interested in Sartre. I don't know much
                      > about
                      > > > or Sartre or I guess I would say life in
                      > general,
                      > > > but thats why I joined so I could understand
                      > > > something. This is very interesting being a
                      > part of
                      > > > this group and reading the arguments and facts,
                      > so I
                      > > > just thought I would say hey even though I have
                      > no
                      > > > idea who I am really saying 'hey' to and ya I
                      > feel
                      > > > kind of crazy doing this even though its not
                      > really
                      > > > crazy. I'm from Iowa by the way.
                      > > >
                      > > > Lou Eugene <ziggysmane@y...> wrote:
                      > > > What's up Sudhir! I definitely have to read
                      > "Being
                      > > > and Nothingness" or "L'Etre et le Neant" to get
                      > a
                      > > > better grasp of what you are talking about. I'm
                      > > > still a little foggy on being-for-itself and
                      > > > being-in-itself. I'm going to do some research
                      > on
                      > > > the net to get the gist of it. Not to get off
                      > the
                      > > > subject, but like I said before I'm reading
                      > > > "L'Etranger". It's a pretty interesting novel in
                      > > > that the anti-hero is sort of disconnected from
                      > the
                      > > > world. It's an extreme example of a guy not
                      > bound to
                      > > > society by the choices he makes. I kind of
                      > > > understand what you're saying when you say that
                      > > > people try to lose themselves in their careers
                      > or
                      > > > bullshit jobs so they won't have to make tough
                      > > > choices. But this guy, Monsieur Mersault, is
                      > making
                      > > > choices that could be considered to be way off
                      > the
                      > > > mainstream. He doesn't feel compelled by
                      > society to
                      > > > love anybody: not his mother, who died, not even
                      > his
                      > > > longtime lover. He's stuck at a dead-end job,
                      > yet he
                      > > > seems to be more free than most "successful"
                      > people
                      > > > with
                      > > > their perfect careers, or even people who are
                      > > > supposedly "in love". He told his lover like
                      > ten
                      > > > times that he didn't love her and he never
                      > visited
                      > > > his mother in her retirement home. His boss told
                      > him
                      > > > he was a loser for not wanting to change
                      > positions
                      > > > and move to Paris like any other young man
                      > would.
                      > > > "Un changement de vie", or a change of
                      > lifestyle,
                      > > > still woudn't fulfill him. I think it's here
                      > that
                      > > > Camus demonstrates the absurdity of life. This
                      > guy
                      > > > makes his decisions and he seems to be content
                      > with
                      > > > himself despite anybody else's judgement. There
                      > are
                      > > > other great examples of the philosophy in this
                      > book,
                      > > > but it would take up too much space and time to
                      > > > explain. I want to continue learning about
                      > > > existentialism in order to discuss it in a more
                      > > > detailed fashion. Keep sending e-mails man!!!!
                      > > > Lou
                      > > >
                      > > >
                      > > > Hi!
                      > > >
                      > > > Its good to see a lot of interesting and
                      > intelligent
                      > > > discussion on Sartre's
                      > > > philosophy and I did happen to read his magnum
                      > opus
                      > > > "Being and Nothingness"
                      > > > years back.
                      > > >
                      > > > The cornerstone of his philosophy as I
                      > understood it
                      > > > was the phenomological
                      > > > exposition of Being-In-Itself.
                      > > > Taking the oft repeated example of a table
                      > existing
                      > > > in a room with an
                      > > > oberver.The "being" table leaps into the
                      > > > concsiousness of the observer.The
                      > > > observer at once grasps the being of the table
                      > its
                      > > > colour,grain etc and the
                      > > > fact that he could use it to say place a few
                      > books
                      > > > on it without
                      > > > differentiating these attributes consciously(A
                      > > > description would be akin to
                      > > > knowledge or quasi state of being).At the heart
                      > of
                      > > > this being "table"
                      > > > revealed to the free consciouness is that it in
                      > a
                      > > > second movement it
                      > > > nihilates itself as not "table".Hence at the
                      > heart
                      > > > of being is nihiliation.
                      > > > The table,the object, experiences no such
                      > > > nihiliation and is all fullness or
                      > > > inexhaustible being in that any observer how
                      > ever
                      > > > many times he percieves
                      > > > the table would have the same fullness of being
                      > > > percieved.
                      > > > This nihiliation is the being-for-iself and is
                      > the
                      > > > source of anguish of
                      > > > existentialism.In that the being in the world
                      > always
                      > > > tries to attain the
                      > > > permanance or fullness of the
                      > Being-In-Itself,like
                      > > > being a waiter,
                      > > > or being a doctor trying to lose one-self in
                      > that
                      > > > role,not having to make
                      > > > any other choice.It tries to escape in bad faith
                      > and
                      > > > cannot face up to
                      > > > itself as a free being constantly having to make
                      > > > choices.
                      > > > And because of nihiliation being at the heart of
                      > his
                      > > > existence it is
                      > > > therefore only in death that the constant
                      > struggle
                      > > > to escape its freedom
                      > > > ceases.
                      > > >
                      > > > What would happen to the Being-for-itself if it
                      > > > turns back upon itself and
                      > > > percieves itself as the ultimate value in
                      > relation
                      > > > to being.By disconnecting
                      >
                      === message truncated ===




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