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Books for Review (Janus Head)

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  • Brent Dean Robbins, Ph.D.
    Dear friends, Janus Head (www.janusheard.org), the international interdisciplinary journal, is currently seeking reviewers for the following books. See below
    Message 1 of 1 , Jul 8, 2004
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      Dear friends,

      Janus Head (www.janusheard.org), the international interdisciplinary
      journal, is currently seeking reviewers for the following books. See
      below for the list of books, along with descriptions of the authors and
      content.

      If you would like to review one of these books for Janus Head, please
      reply to this e-mail. (Send e-mail to bdeanrob@... or
      jhinfo@...). In your response, include the following
      information: Your name, academic degree(s), affiliation, and any other
      qualifications for reviewing the text. Also, include your current
      mailing address.

      Reviews are expected to be in the range of 750-2500 words (including
      references) depending on the length and nature of the material. Reviews
      are expected within 90 days of receiving the book. Upon writing the
      review, the book is yours to keep. You will also receive a complimentary
      copy of the Janus Head issue in which your work appears, and you will
      receive a free one-year subscription to the journal.

      If you have any questions or concerns, feel free to ask me.

      Best wishes,
      Brent Dean Robbins, Ph.D.
      Editor-in-Chief, Janus Head
      bdeanrob@...
      http://www.janushead.org

      BOOKS FOR REVIEW

      DRUG WARS: THE POLITICAL ECONOMY OF NARCOTICS
      By Curtis Marez

      Cultural critic Curtis Marez (Assistant Professor of critical studies at
      University of Southern California School of Cinema-Television) examines
      two hundred years of writing, graphic works, films, and music that both
      demonize and celebrate the commerce in cocaine, marijuana, and opium,
      providing a bold interdisciplinary exploration of drugs in the popular
      imagination. Marez juxtaposes official drug policy and propaganda with
      subversive images that challenge and sometimes even taunt government and
      legal efforts. As Marez shows, despite the state's best efforts to use
      the media to obscure the hypocrisies and failures of its drug policites,
      marginalized groups have consistently opposed the expansion of state
      power that drug traffic has historically supported.

      DÉJÀ VU: ABBERATIONS OF CULTURAL MEMORY
      By Peter Krapp

      Referring to a past that never was, déjà vu shares a structure not only
      with fiction but also with the more sophisticated effects of media
      technology. Tracing the term from the end of the 19th century, Peter
      Krapp (Assistant Professor of new media in the Department of Film and
      Media at the University of California, Irvine) examines the genealogy
      and history of the experience of déjà vu, offers a refreshing
      counterpoint to the cliched celebrations of cultural memory, and forces
      us to do a double take on the sanctimonious warnings against forgetting
      so common in our time. Strictly speaking, déjà vu is neither a failure
      of memory nor a form of forgetting. This exploration of the effects of
      déjà vu pivots around the work of Walter Benjamin and includes readings
      of kitsch and aura in Andy Warhol's work, of cinematic violence, of the
      memorial character of architecture, and of the high expectations raised
      by the internet.

      FRENCH FEMINIST THEORY
      By Dani Cavallaro

      Offers an introduction to the key concepts and themes in French feminist
      thought, both the materialist and the linguistic/psychoanalytic
      traditions. These are explored through the work of a wide range of
      theorists. The book outlines the philosophical and political diversity
      of French feminism, setting developments in the field in the particular
      cultural and social contexts in which they have emerged and unfolded.
      The principle areas covered are: ongoing debates on the cultural
      construction and definition of sexual and gendered identities; the
      relationship between subjectivity and language; the roles played by both
      private and public institutions in the shaping of sexual relations; the
      issue of embodiment; and the relationship between gender, sexuality and
      race. Finally, the book traces the connections between French and
      Anglo-American feminist approaches and methodologies. The author,
      Cavallaro, is a freelance writer specializing in literary studies,
      critical and cultural theory and the visual arts. Her publications
      include The Gothic Vision, Critical and Cultural Theory and Cyberpunk
      and Cyberculture.

      LATE PSALM
      By Betsky Sholl

      Poetry. Sholl is the author of five books including The Red Line and
      Don't Explain, 1997 winner of the Felix Pollak Prize in Poetry. She
      teaches at the University of Southern Maine and in the MFA program at
      Vermont College.

      THE LESSON OF THE MASTER: ON BORGES AND HIS WORK
      by Norman Thomas Di Giovanni

      An indispensable work for all readers of Borges and an essential
      illumination of one of the great masters of 20th century literature. The
      author, di Giovanni, writes movingly of his and Borges's friendship and
      close collaboration. He draws on this unique relationship to explore
      Borges's work and in these insightful and often humerous essays succeeds
      in enliving our understanding of the author and the man.

      JEWISH PHILOSOPHY: AN HISTORICAL INTRODUCTION
      By Norbert M. Samuelson

      Surveys the history of Jewish philosophy, from the formation of the
      Hebrew Scriptures to the present time. The author discusses the nature
      of God, the origin and end of the universe, and the moral value of
      humanity, all from the distinct perspective of Jewish intellectual
      history. Samuelson is a Professor of Religious Studies and the Harold
      and Jean Grossman Chair of Jewish Studies at Arizona State University in
      Tempe. He is the author of six books and over 200 articles, and the
      co-editor of three collected volumes and essays.

      ART AND ARGUMENT: WHAT WORDS CAN'T DO AND WHAT THEY CAN
      By Bruce E. Fleming

      Fleming is professor of English at the U.S. Naval Academy in Annapolis.
      His first publishes story was included in the O. Henry Awards volume of
      its year; he has published many articles, essays, and stories in leading
      journals and literary quarterlies. His first scholarly book, a theory of
      aesthetics called An Essay in Post-Romantic Literary Theory, won the
      1991 Award in Comparative Studies of the Northeast Modern Language
      Association. He is the author of three other books in aesthetics and
      Modernism, and a book of dance essays entitled Sex, Art, and Audience.
      His first novel, Twilley, was compared by reviewers to works by Proust,
      Henry James, Thoreau and David Lynch.

      DIMENSIONS OF APEIRON: A TOPOLOGICAL PHENOMENOLOGY OF SPACE, TIME AND
      INDIVIDUATION
      By Steven M. Rosen

      This book explores the evolution of space and time from the apeiron--the
      spaceless, timeless chaos of primordial nature. Rosen examines Western
      culture's effort to deny apeiron, and the critical need now to lift the
      repression on apeiron for the sake of human individuation.

      HISTORY BEYOND TRAUMA
      By Francoise Davoine and Jean-Max Gaudilliere
      Translated by Susan Fairfield

      The authors present vivid examples of clinical work with severely
      traumatized patients, reaching inward to their own intimate family
      histories as shaped by the Second World War and outward toward an
      exceptionally broad range of cultural references to literature,
      philosophy, political theory, and anthropology. In order to show how the
      therapeutic approach to trauma was developed on the basis of war
      psychiatry, the authors ground their clinical theory in the work of
      Thomas Salmon, an American doctor from the time of the First World War.
      With their clear, direct presentation, and a special focus on the
      relationship between psychoanalysis and the neurosciences, Davoine and
      Gaudilliere show how the patient-analyst relationship opens pathways of
      investigation into the nature of madness. Davoine and Gaudilliere have
      worked as consultants at a public psychiatric hospital and in private
      practice. They are currently professors at the Ecole des Hautes Etudes
      en Sciences Scholars Sociales in Paris and both hold advanced degrees in
      classics and doctorates in sociology.

      THE OBJECTS OF SOCIAL SCIENCE
      by Eleonora Montuschi

      Presents a clear and structured analysis of the philosophy of social
      science across each of its main disciplines: Anthropology, Sociology,
      History, Economics, and Geography. It both identifies the practical and
      theoretical procedures involved in the identification of the object and,
      at the same time, raises questions about the very objectivity of these
      procedures in analysing the object. The author, Montuschi, teaches
      Philosophy of Social Science at the London School of Economics and
      Political Science, where she is Deputy Director, Centre for Philosophy
      of Natural and Social Sciences.

      WETWARES: EXPERIMENTS IN POSTVITAL LIVING
      By Richard Doyle

      The mind of the machine, the body suspended in time, organs exchanged,
      thought computed, genes manipulated, DNA samples abducted by alients:
      the terrain between sciencec and speculation, fraught with the
      possibility of technological and perhaps even evolutionary
      transformations, is the territory Doyle explores. The book ranges over
      recent research in articial life, cloning, cryonics, computer science,
      organ transplantation, and alien abduction. Moving between actual
      technical practices, serious speculative technology, and science
      fiction, Doyle shows us emerging scientific paradigms where "life"
      becomes more a matter of information than inner vitality--in short,
      becomes "wetwares" for DNA and computer networks. Viewing technologies
      of immortality--from cryonics to artificial life--as disciplines for
      welcoming a thoroughly other future, the book offers tools for an
      evolutionary, transhuman mutation in the utterly unpredictable decades
      to come. Doyle is Associate Professor of rhetoric and science studies in
      the Department of English at Penn State University. He is the author of
      On beyond Living: Rhetorical Transformations of the Life Sciences.

      ABSTRACT SEX: PHILOSOPHY, BIO-TECHNOLOGY AND THE MUTATIONS OF DESIRE
      By Luciana Parisi

      Investigates the impact of advances in contemporary science and
      information technology on conceptions of sex. Evolutionary theory and
      the technologies of viral information transfer, cloning and genetic
      engineering are changing the way we think about human sex, reproduction
      and the communication of genetic information. Sex is no longer a linear
      process or a private act. It is not central to the proliferating world
      of cyber-capitalism. Humankind has entered a time of molecular sex, when
      information is traded not only across sexes but across species and
      between humans and machines. This text presents a philosophical
      exploration of this new world of sexual, informatic and capitalist
      multiplicity, and of the accelerated mutation of nature and culture.
      Parisi is Senior Lecturer in Digital Media Cultures in the Department of
      Cultural Studies, University of East London.

      BADIOU: A SUBJECT TO TRUTH
      By Peter Hallword
      With Forward by Slavoj Zizek

      Hallward is lecturer in the French Department at King's College, London.
      His previous publications include Absolutely Postcolonial: Writing
      between the Singular and the Specific and a translation of Alain
      Badiou's Ethics: An Essay on the Understanding of Evil. The text
      provides a comprehensive introduction to the work of major contemporary
      philosopher, Alain Badiou.

      ZOONTOLOGIES: THE QUESTION OF THE ANIMAL
      Edited by Cary Wolfe

      Wolfe is a professor of English at the State University of New York,
      Albany. He is the author of Critical Environments and coeditor of
      Observing Complexity. Contributors to the volume include Steve Baker,
      Jacques Derrida, Ursula K. Heise, Charlie LeDuff, Alphonso Lingis, Paul
      Patton, Judith Roof and David Willis. The text explores how nonhuman
      beings pose philosophical and ethical questions that go to the root not
      just of what we think but of who we are. Their presence asks: what
      happens when the Other can no longer safely be assumed to be human? This
      collection offers a set of incitements and coordinates for exploring how
      these issues have been represented in contemporary culture and theory.

      SINGING IN THE FIRE: STORIES OF WOMEN IN PHILOSOPHY
      Edited by Linda Martin Alcoff

      Alcoff is Professor of Philosophy, Political Science and Women's Studies
      at Syracuse University. Contributors to the volume include Sandra Lee
      Bartky, Teresa Brennan, Claudia Card, Virginia Held, Alison M. Jaggar,
      Stephanie R. Lewis, Uma Narayan, Martha C. Nussbaum, Andrea Nye, Ofelia
      Schutte, Kristin Shrader-Frechette, and Karen J. Warren. The text is a
      unique, groundbreaking collection of autobiographical essays by leading
      women in philosophy. It mines the experience that witnessed, and helped
      create, the remarkable advanced now evident for women in the field.
      These women are leaders and innovators looking back on how they have
      been treated, how they might have done things differently, and how we
      might make progress in future generations.

      AVATAR BODIES: A TANTRA FOR POSTHUMANISM
      By Ann Weinstone

      Combining philosophy, literary criticism, fiction, autobiography, and
      real and imagined correspondence, Ann Weinstone proposes that only when
      we stop ordering the other to be other--whether technological, animal,
      or simply inanimate--will we become posthuman. Posthmanism has thus far
      focused nearly exclusively on human-technology relations. Avatar Bodies
      develops a posthumanist vocabular for human-to-human relationships that
      relies on our capacities for devotion, personality and pleasure. Drawing
      on both the philosophies and practices of Indian Tantra, Weinstone
      argues for the impossibility of absolute otherness; we are all avatar
      bodies, consisting of undecidably shared gestures, skills, memories,
      sensations, beliefs and affects. Weinstone is Assistant Professor of
      Literature and New Media at Northwestern University and the winner of
      the 1994 Chelsea Award for Fiction.

      CONNECTED, OR WHAT IT MEANS TO LIVE IN THE NETWORK SOCIETY
      By Steven Shaviro

      Shaviro (author of Doom Patrols, The Cinematic Body, and Passion and
      Excess, and professor of film studies and English at the University of
      Washington) argues that our strange new world is increasingly being
      transformed in ways, and by devices, that seem to come out of the pages
      of science fiction, even while the world itself is becoming a futuristic
      landscape. The result is that science fiction provides the most useful
      social theory, the only form that manages to be as radical as reality
      itself. Connected shows how the continual experimentation of science
      fiction, like science and technology themselves, conjures the invisible
      social and economic forces around us.

      KNOWLEDGE, POWER AND DISCIPLINE: GERMAN STUDIES AND NATIONAL IDENTITY
      By Pier Carlo Bontempelli
      Translated by Gabriele Poole

      German Studies has confronted many crises, as well as severe criticism
      and self-criticism, and yet it has managed to maintain its disciplinary
      system through every upheaval--the revolution of 1848, the establishment
      of the Second Reich in 1871, the Weimar Republic, the Nazi Third Reich,
      the Second World War and the reconstruction era, the creation and
      reunification of the two German states. Bontempelli (associate professor
      of German Studies at University of Cassino, Italy) focuses on this
      continuity, revived by each generation of scholars in order to
      legitimize their position of power--and to ensure their capacity for
      cultural reproduction. Using the works of Michel Foucault and Pierre
      Bourdieu, Bontempelli investigates the institution and principles of
      German Studies and critically reconstructs its history. Mindful of the
      mechanisms of choice and domination operating at every turn, his book
      exposes the repressed social and political history of German Studies.

      THE NATURE OF TRUTH
      By Sergio Troncoso

      Novel. The author, Troncoso, is the son of Mexican immigrants, who grew
      up in Ysleta, a community on the east side of El Paso, Texas. After
      graduating from Harvard, he was a Fulbright scholar to Mexico and
      studied international relations and philosophy at Yale Univeristy. His
      first book, The Last Tortilla and Other Stories, won the Premio Aztlan
      and the Southwest Book Award. He teaches at Yale during the summer and
      lives in New York City. The Nature of Truth tells a story of Helmut
      Sanchez, a young researcher in the emply of renowned Yale professor
      Werner Hofgartner, who by chance discovers a letter written decades ago
      by his boss mocking guilt over the Holocaust. Appalled, Helmut digs into
      the scholar's life to uncover evidence of Hopfgartner's hateful past.
      Soon, Helmut's intellectual quest for the truth becomes a journey of
      justice and blood--one with unforeseen consequences.

      THE CHALLENGE OF BERGSONISM
      By Leonard Lawlor

      The great influence of Henri Bergson on contemporary philosophy is only
      now becoming clear. Part of this renaissance in Bergsonism is due to
      Gilles Deleuze and Emmanuel Levinas, both of whom have acknowledged
      Bergson as an inspiration for their philosophy. Bergson's key
      philosophical concept is'duration,' a concept which encompasses both
      memory and life. The Challenge of Bergsonism analyzes this central but
      complex concept through a close reading of one of Bergson's key works,
      Matter and Memory, seting this in the broader context of Bergson's
      writings. The Challenge of Bergonism explores how Bergsonism questions
      our ways of thinking, particularly the concept of reality, and
      ultimately demands a return to ethics. The book also includes the first
      English translation of Jean Hyppolite's highly influential essay,
      "Various Aspects of Memory in Bergson." The author, Lawlor, is Dunavant
      Distinguished Professor of Philosophy at the University of Memphis. He
      has written widely on Continental Philosophy.

      ONE UNBLINKING EYE
      By Norman Williams

      Poetry. Williams is the recipient of an Award in Literature from the
      American Academy and Institute of Arts and Letters, an Ingram Merrill
      Fellowship, the I.B. Lavan Award, and the Amy Lowell Fellowship. A
      practicing attorney in Burlington, Vermont, Williams has appeared before
      the U.S. Supreme Court in several cases, including Williams v. Vermont.

      PHILOSOPHY AND ORDINARY LANGUAGE: THE BENT AND GENIUS OF OUR TONGUE
      By Oswald Hanfling

      A defence of the view that philosophy is largely about questions of
      language, which to a large extent means ordinary language. Hanfling
      shows that this view does not entail that philosophy is less deep and
      difficult than it is usually taken to be. Special chapters are devoted
      to Austin, Wittgenstein, Quine and Grice; and among the other thinkers
      discussed are Plato, Frege, Ryle, Russell, Strawson, and Putnam and
      Kripke. Hanfling is Visiting Research Professor of Philosophy at the
      Open University. He is the author of several books including Logical
      Positivism, The Quest for Meaning, Wittgenstein's Later Philosophy, and
      Wittgenstein and the Human Form of Life.

      THE SELECTED POEMS OF HOWARD NEMEROV
      Edited by Daniel Anderson
      Forward by Wyatt Prunty

      Howard Nemerov--Poet Laureate of the United States, winner of the
      Pulitzer Prize and National Book Award, and Chancellor of the Academy of
      American Poets--was one of the most prolific and significant American
      poets of his day. This judicious collection introduced by poet Daniel
      Anderson represents some of the finest poetry produced in the 20th century.

      FRANCIS BACON: THE LOGIC OF SENSATION
      By Gilles Deleuze
      Translated with an introduction by Daniel W. Smith
      Afterword by Tom Conley

      First published in 1981, Francis Bacon has come to be recognized as one
      of Deleuze's most significant texts in aesthetics.

      TRANSEXUALISM: ILLUSION AND REALITY
      By Colette Chiland
      Translated by Philip Slotkin

      Chiland is Psychiatrist-in-Chief at the Alfred-Binet Center and
      Professor Emerita of clinical psychology at Univerity Rene Descartes in
      Paris. She is the author of several books, including Homo
      Psychanalyticus (1990). Transexualism combines the insights of
      psychology, psychoanalysis, history, anthropology, sociology and
      personal experience to rethink transexualism within the frames of
      identity, subjectivity and the wider social-historical world. The text
      challenges readers of every sexual identity and orientation to
      reconsider their notions about the origins, implications and
      possibilities of gender.

      THRESHOLDS OF WESTERN CULTURE: IDENTITY, POSTCOLONIALITY, TRANSNATIONALISM
      by John Burt Foster Jr. and Wayne J. Froman

      Explores identity, postcoloniality and transnationalism--three closely
      related issues which redefine contemporary cultural identity. The book
      opens with an analysis of subjectivity and the cultural meltdown that
      accompanied fascism in the West. The situation in Africa is then
      explored which, while recalling modernity's dark side, highlights the
      intricacy of postcolonial identity. Post-Soviet Eastern Europe presents
      a separate case of neglected postcoloniality which emphasized how
      ethnocentrism and cultural tensions have exposed the fragility of
      transnationalism. The book concludes with an examination of East Asia, a
      region which offers transnational options potentially much more fruitful
      than Balkanization. Contributors include Caroline Bayard, James Berger,
      Marcel Cornis-Pope, Lars Engle, Eugene Eoyang, Rolf J. Goebel, Anthony
      John Harding, Michiel Heyns, Tomislav Z. Longinovic Nikita Nankov,
      Iyunolu Osagie, Herman Rapaport, Robert M. Strozier and Mary Ann Frese
      Witt. Editor John Burt Foster Jr. is Professor of English and Cultural
      Studies at George Mason University. Wayne J. Froman is Associate
      Professor of Philosophy and Cultural Studies and former Chair of the
      Department of Philosophy and Religious Studies at George Mason University.

      ANALYZING PROSE (SECOND EDITION)
      By Richard A. Lanham

      This book provides a basic descriptive terminology for prose style. What
      is a noun style? A verb style? A hypotactic or paratactic one? How does
      the running style differ from the periodic style? What do "high, middle,
      and low mean, when applied to prose style? How might one apply the
      classical terminology of rhetorical figures to prose analysis? Analyzing
      Prose supplies detailed, carefully charted answers to these questions.
      It teaches a student of prose style how and where to begin. The author,
      Lanham, is Professor Emeritus of English at UCLA.

      THE ROMANCE OF INDIVIDUALISM IN EMERSON AND NIETZSCHE
      By David Mikics

      Mikics is an associate professor of English at the University of
      Houston. He is the author of The Limits of Moralizing: Pathos and
      Subjectivity in Spenser and Milton, as well as articles on contemporary
      literature and literary theory. The book is the first study of
      Nietzche's difference from Emerson, as well as his indebtedness to
      Emerson. It explains why Nietzsche is interested in asceticism and
      Emerson is not.

      WHAT PHILOSOPHY IS
      Edited by Havi Carel and David Gamez
      Foreword by Simon Blackburn

      Opens up the many forking paths of philosophy by soliciting the answer
      to the question "What is philosophy" from the people who are directly
      involved in its practice and production. The resulting collection
      provides focused discussions of the character and methods of philosophy
      and its relationship with such other disciplines as literature,
      politics, psychology, and science, without flattening the texture of
      individual philosophers' ideas, like so many other introductions to
      philosophy. Some of the key contributors to the volume include: Simon
      Blackburn, Michael Friedman, Julian Baggini, Manuel DeLanda, Simon
      Critchley, Simon Glendinning, Matthew Matravers, and Christoph Menke.
      Havi Carel is lecturer in Philosophy at Univeristy of York. David Gamez
      is at Queen Mary, University of London.

      BODY AND WORLD
      By Samuel Todes
      With introductions by Hubert L. Dreyfus and Piotr Hoffman

      Todes was Associate Professor of Philosophy at Northwestern University
      at the time of his death in 1994. Body and World is based on his
      dissertation, written in 1963 and published in 1990 in the series
      Harvard Dissertations in Philosophy under the title The Human Body as
      Material Subject in the World. Todes goes beyond Martin Heidegger and
      Maurice Merleau-Ponty in his description of how independent physical
      nature and experience are united in our bodily action. His account
      allows him to preserve the authority of experience while avoiding the
      tendency toward idealism that threatens both Heidegger and Merleau-Ponty.

      MIND OVER MIND: THE ANTHROPOLOGY AND PSYCHOLOGY OF SPIRIT POSSESSION
      By Morton Klass

      Spirit possession is ritually important in many cultures from India to
      Brazil to Madagascar, but has tended to be narrowly regarded from modern
      American and European perspectives as a psychopathological problem of
      multiple personal disorder. This book proposes an integration of
      anthropological and psychological approaches, concluding with a new
      analytical framework for understanding spirit possession and resolving
      the controversy surrounding the "reality" of possession. The issues
      raised are thus essential in both the anthropology of religion and the
      psychology of altered states of consciousness. At the same time, Mind
      over Mind confronts the most challenging philosophicazl issues of human
      consciousness and human identity, which cannot be properly formulated
      without the insights of social and cultural anthropology. At the most
      general level, this study argues for the unequivocal importance of an
      interdisciplinary approach to spirit possession and for the integral
      significance of anthropology for the other human sciences. The author,
      Klass, was professor of anthropology at Barnard College, Columbia
      University. His books include East Indians in Trinidad: A Study of
      Cultural Persistence, From Field to Factory: Community Structure and
      Industrialization in West Bengal, Caste: The Emergence of the South
      Asian Social System, Singing with Sai Baba: The Politics of
      Revitalization in Trinidad, and Ordered Universes: Approaches to the
      Anthropology of Religion.

      ARE WE IN TIME? AND OTHER ESSAYS ON TIME AND TEMPORALITY
      By Charles M. Sherover (Edited by Gregory R. Johnson)

      "Are we in time?" Sherover asks, and in pursuing this question he
      considers time in conjunction with cognition, morality, action, physical
      nature, being, God, freedom, and politics. His essays, while drawing
      upon Josiah Royce, Martin Heidegger, Immanuel Kant, Gottfried Wilhelm
      Leibniz, and even Charles Hartshorne and Henri Bergson, defy
      categorization by method or school; instead, they reveal the diversity
      and divergence of thinking about time as well as the myriad features and
      values within the omnipresence of time and change. Sherover is a
      professor emeritus of philosophy at Hunter College. He is the editor of
      The Human Experience of Time; the author of Heidegger, Kant, and Time
      and Time, Freedom, and the Common Good; and the translator of Rousseau's
      Social Contract. He received the 2002 Josiah Royce Award from the
      Society for the Advancement of American Philosophy.

      THE WILD REGION IN LIFE-HISTORY
      By Laszlo Tengelyi (Translated from the German by Geza Kallay with the
      author)

      Offers a phenomenological appraoch to some of the main topics of
      theoretical philosophy--such as meaning, sense, temporality, unity of
      life, narrative history, self-identity, and intersubjectivity--as well
      as an ethics of alterity. Tengelyi's point of departure is a critical
      examination of narrative view of the self, which tends to equate
      life-history and personal identity. Challenging this view as too one
      dimensional and reflective, Tengelyi reveals a hidden area of sense
      formation in life-history--an area in which force and meaning do not
      merely blend but in many ways undermine each other. It is this hidden
      area that the Wild Region in Life-History describes. Tengelyi is a
      professor of philosophy at Bergische Universitaet Wuppertal in Germany
      and serves on the editorial board for the journal Husserl Studies. He
      was recently elected president of the German Society of Phenomenological
      Research. He has published numerous articles in international journals
      as well as several books in Hungarian and one book in German.

      CARNAP BROUGHT HOME: THE VIEW FROM JENA
      Edited by Steve Awodey and Carsten Klein

      With his books The Logical Structure of the World and The Logical Syntax
      of Language, as well as classic essays such as "Testability and Meaning"
      and "Empiricism, Semantics and Ontology," Rudolf Carnap (1891-1970) was
      an influential pioneer of logical positivism and analytic philosophy.
      Though it was long thought that logical positivism had been destroyed by
      the polemics of Quine, Popper, and Kuhn, leading philosophers have
      recently been reappraising this verdict. This volume presents the latest
      contributions to this discussion and adds a number of new voices who
      look at Carnap from a more international view--bringing out, for
      instance, the roots of his thought in Continental neo-Kantianism and
      Dilthey's Lebensphilosophie, and stressing his deep commitment to
      political and cultural change. Carnap grew up in the German town of
      Jena, where in his student days he was an active member of the utopian
      "Sera Group," part of the German youth movement. At the time, he was one
      of Frege's students, and was deeply influenced by him.



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