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PROFOUND EPICUREANISM

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  • Lev Kamensky
    http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Taman_Ketenangan/ (An Epicurean is someone who uses reason to rid his mind from fear and other negative emotions, because only
    Message 1 of 3 , Oct 1, 2003
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      http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Taman_Ketenangan/
      (An Epicurean is someone who uses reason to rid his mind from fear
      and other negative emotions, because only being mentaly calm can one
      experience pleasure, and one cannot live wisely or justly without
      living pleasantly. To do this one must always be mindful of reality,
      and the natural purpose of all things; look for reliable friends,
      strive for self-sufficiency, and make every choice and avoidance
      consistant with The Goal)
    • dnewdeath@aol.com
      In a message dated 10/1/2003 4:27:57 AM Eastern Daylight Time, ... I use drugs. Daniel Rocco-Rusk [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      Message 2 of 3 , Oct 1, 2003
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        In a message dated 10/1/2003 4:27:57 AM Eastern Daylight Time,
        levichi@... writes:

        > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Taman_Ketenangan/
        > (An Epicurean is someone who uses reason to rid his mind from fear
        > and other negative emotions, because only being mentaly calm can one
        > experience pleasure, and one cannot live wisely or justly without
        > living pleasantly. To do this one must always be mindful of reality,
        > and the natural purpose of all things; look for reliable friends,
        > strive for self-sufficiency, and make every choice and avoidance
        > consistant with The Goal)
        >

        I use drugs.
        Daniel Rocco-Rusk


        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Elaine Phipps-Earl
        Sent: Wednesday, October 01, 2003 6:27 PM Subject: [Sartre] PROFOUND EPICUREANISM Taylor perceives Shaftesbury s term natural affection as reflecting both an
        Message 3 of 3 , Oct 1, 2003
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          Sent: Wednesday, October 01, 2003 6:27 PM
          Subject: [Sartre] PROFOUND EPICUREANISM


          Taylor perceives Shaftesbury's term "natural affection" as reflecting both
          an understanding of "internalisation" or "subjectivization" of a
          "teleological ethic of nature" and "the transformation of an ethic of order,
          harmony and equilibrium into an ethic of benevolence". Not only was the good
          we love seen as a vision of the whole order of the good in the cosmos, but
          also in the good and ordered soul of the wise man, aligned with nature.
          However, one could only have a good and ordered soul in seeing and loving
          the good in ordered things. Where for Plato, the good was seen in a vision
          of the good in the cosmos and for the Stoic, seeing and affirming the course
          of good order in the world, for Epicurean moralists, the soul's good was in
          loving the cosmic good (p.255).



          In light of our being rational creatures, man with the capacity to reason,
          reason was understood substantively. Rationality was perceived as the power
          to grasp the order of things, this order reflecting reason. As it was in man
          's nature, as a rational being, to love rational order when he sees it, in
          begging the question of why we should love the cosmic good, the logical
          answer was because the rational man not only sees the good, but also grasps
          the reason for its being good. Hence, man's inability to resolve conflict in
          the world was a result of his inability to see the good and grasp the reason
          for it being good. This inability to perceive the good and order of things
          and in turn the inability to grasp reason was a result of man's blindness,
          men blinded by their focus upon sensible things, blinded by false opinions
          and dogma, these perceived as taking the form of passions. However, the love
          of cosmic good was not perceived through "inward" focus upon the motivation
          "in" psyche. The cosmic good needed no motivation, for it was essentially
          loveable in itself (pp.255-6).
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