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Re: Bennett

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  • canadiangeese2820
    Are they talking about Bennett the values man? I don t know either. ... of the ... unfamiliar ... Generally the ... are people
    Message 1 of 5 , Jun 6, 2003
      Are they talking about Bennett the "values" man? I don't know either.

      --- In Sartre@yahoogroups.com, anjo3jantz@a... wrote:
      > Someone made the comment that Bennett was "the greatest philosopher
      of the
      > 20th century." I must confess my ignorance because not only am I
      unfamiliar
      > with his work, but until now I had never even heard of the guy.
      Generally the
      > names I hear when people talk about "the greatest" of the 20th c.
      are people
      > such as Sartre, Heidegger, Russell, Wittgenstein. But Bennett?
      >
      > Would anyone care to give a brief synopsis of his major themes?
      > Thanks.
      > Andrew
      >
      >
      > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • jgbardis
      Claude Caspar provided a link to Bennett Books in post 5933. There is a brief description of Bennett s many books there, including his major work The Dramatic
      Message 2 of 5 , Jun 10, 2003
        Claude Caspar provided a link to Bennett Books in post 5933. There is
        a brief description of Bennett's many books there, including his
        major work "The Dramatic Universe".

        The first volume is subtitled "The Foundations of Natural Philosophy".

        One of the key ideas in the first volume - which resonates somewhat
        with Sartre - is that there are three elements of experience: Being,
        Function and Will. Being has to do with consciousness, Function with
        knowledge and Will with understanding. So what we can "know" is only
        a small part of what's going on.

        Another central idea of the first volume, which comes from Ouspensky,
        is that the universe can only be understood in terms of six
        dimensions.

        Another central idea is that the first twelve numbers can represent
        twelve categories, the monad, the dyad, the triad, etc. In volume
        three he expands this to twelve systems.

        Another key idea is that the "entities" of the universe can be placed
        in three "groups": Hyponomic entities which are non-living things,
        Autonomic entities which are living things, and Hypernomic entities
        which are conscious, intelligent things.

        If Bennett had disassociated himself from Gurdjieff and Ouspensky,
        perhaps his great work would have been considered in philosophy
        departments. Because he did not do that, his work has been relegated
        to the so-called Fourth Way. Unfortunately "The Dramatic Universe" is
        not considered canonical in the Fourth Way, so those people don't
        read it. And most of them would be incapable of reading it anyway.

        The modern philosopher who most greatly influenced Bennett was
        Whitehead. But "The Dramatic Universe" probably most closely
        resembles Teilhard's "The Phenomenon of Man".

        Teilhard and Sartre seem to be very different. But the Fourth Way is
        divided into a cosmological side and a psychological side. When it is
        considered that Teilhard is primarily dealing with the cosmological
        side, and Sartre with the psychological side, much similarity can be
        found between the two.

        Gurdjieff presented a great system which he claimed to learn from
        those who, in turn, learned it from others. There is definitely a
        mystery here. Perhaps thinkers like Sartre and Santayana, who appear
        to be completely independent, are in fact members of something we
        know nothing about.

        John


        --- In Sartre@yahoogroups.com, "canadiangeese2820"
        <canadiangeese2820@y...> wrote:
        > Are they talking about Bennett the "values" man? I don't know
        either.
        >
        > --- In Sartre@yahoogroups.com, anjo3jantz@a... wrote:
        > > Someone made the comment that Bennett was "the greatest
        philosopher
        > of the
        > > 20th century." I must confess my ignorance because not only am I
        > unfamiliar
        > > with his work, but until now I had never even heard of the guy.
        > Generally the
        > > names I hear when people talk about "the greatest" of the 20th c.
        > are people
        > > such as Sartre, Heidegger, Russell, Wittgenstein. But Bennett?
        > >
        > > Would anyone care to give a brief synopsis of his major themes?
        > > Thanks.
        > > Andrew
        > >
        > >
        > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • claude caspar
        Claude Caspar provided a link to Bennett Books in post 5933. There is a brief description of Bennett s many books there, including his major work The Dramatic
        Message 3 of 5 , Jun 10, 2003
          Claude Caspar provided a link to Bennett Books in post 5933. There is
          a brief description of Bennett's many books there, including his
          major work "The Dramatic Universe".


          I am 53 today- for 30 years studying Sufi & Tantra & other paths in India,
          Middle-East & Africa- even in USA!- have found real gold amongst the fool's
          gold, too! Since this is Sartreland, a word to the wise:

          Peter Washington's "Madame Blavatsky's Baboon"

          "The truth is cruel, but it can be loved. And, it frees those who have
          loved it." Santayana

          _________________________________________________________________
          Tired of spam? Get advanced junk mail protection with MSN 8.
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          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • JOHN BARDIS
          Happy birthday, Claude. John ... From: claude caspar Sent: Tuesday, June 10, 2003 4:30 PM To: Sartre@yahoogroups.com Subject: Re: [Sartre] Re: Bennett Claude
          Message 4 of 5 , Jun 10, 2003
            Happy birthday, Claude.

            John

            ----- Original Message -----
            From: claude caspar
            Sent: Tuesday, June 10, 2003 4:30 PM
            To: Sartre@yahoogroups.com
            Subject: Re: [Sartre] Re: Bennett

            Claude Caspar provided a link to Bennett Books in post 5933. There is
            a brief description of Bennett's many books there, including his
            major work "The Dramatic Universe".


            I am 53 today- for 30 years studying Sufi & Tantra & other paths in India,
            Middle-East & Africa- even in USA!- have found real gold amongst the fool's
            gold, too! Since this is Sartreland, a word to the wise:

            Peter Washington's "Madame Blavatsky's Baboon"

            "The truth is cruel, but it can be loved. And, it frees those who have
            loved it." Santayana

            _________________________________________________________________
            Tired of spam? Get advanced junk mail protection with MSN 8.
            http://join.msn.com/?page=features/junkmail


            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


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