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Apostles of Sartre

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  • anjo3jantz@aol.com
    Just read a very interesting book which some of you may be interested in.  It s called Apostles of Sartre: Existentialism in America 1945-1963 , by Ann
    Message 1 of 3 , May 7, 2003
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      Just read a very interesting book which some of you may be interested in. 
      It's called "Apostles of Sartre: Existentialism in America 1945-1963", by Ann
      Fulton (1999 Northwestern Univ. Press).

      It discusses how existentialism began seeping into this country in the late
      40's, and that it was scorned at first as being a fad of post-war France.  At
      that time the only works available in English were Sartre's literary works. 
      America at the time was heavily under the spell of the English analytics, and
      modern Continental philosophy was practically unknown.  Then Hazel Barnes
      translated "Being and Nothingness" in 1956 and suddenly American philosophers
      were forced to take existentialism seriously, and in fact, a number of them
      came over to the existentialist camp, which meant that certain university
      philosophy departments began delving into Continental philosophy in general,
      and existentialism in particular.  Yale and Northwestern were two of the
      hotbeds.

      The book is more historical than philisophical, but that's one of the things
      that makes it so interesting.  I highly recommend it.

      Andrew


      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Stephen Cowley
      It sounds really interesting. Does it say anything about William Barrett in New York, who wrote What is Existentialism?, or Walter Kaufmann, who published a
      Message 2 of 3 , May 7, 2003
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        It sounds really interesting. Does it say anything about William Barrett in
        New York, who wrote What is Existentialism?, or Walter Kaufmann, who
        published a collection called from Something to Sartre? I find the history
        of influences interesting in itself, as sometimes I find I've drunk in the
        claims made on behalf of people like Sartre quite uncritically in my earlier
        years from secondary sources, while my attention was on the philosophy. So
        that makes it interesting to look at them again.

        Stephen

        ----- Original Message -----
        From: <anjo3jantz@...>
        To: <Sartre@yahoogroups.com>
        Sent: Thursday, May 08, 2003 6:25 AM
        Subject: [Sartre] Apostles of Sartre


        Just read a very interesting book which some of you may be interested in.
        It's called "Apostles of Sartre: Existentialism in America 1945-1963", by
        Ann
        Fulton (1999 Northwestern Univ. Press).

        It discusses how existentialism began seeping into this country in the late
        40's, and that it was scorned at first as being a fad of post-war France. At
        that time the only works available in English were Sartre's literary works.
        America at the time was heavily under the spell of the English analytics,
        and
        modern Continental philosophy was practically unknown. Then Hazel Barnes
        translated "Being and Nothingness" in 1956 and suddenly American
        philosophers
        were forced to take existentialism seriously, and in fact, a number of them
        came over to the existentialist camp, which meant that certain university
        philosophy departments began delving into Continental philosophy in general,
        and existentialism in particular. Yale and Northwestern were two of the
        hotbeds.

        The book is more historical than philisophical, but that's one of the things
        that makes it so interesting. I highly recommend it.

        Andrew


        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]



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      • anjo3jantz@aol.com
        Yes, both Barrett and Kaufmann are included. There s another book just out (January) that looks interesting, though I haven t read it yet. It s called
        Message 3 of 3 , May 8, 2003
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          Yes, both Barrett and Kaufmann are included.

          There's another book just out (January) that looks interesting, though I
          haven't read it yet. It's called "Existential America" by George Cotkin,
          published by Johns Hopkins.

          Andrew


          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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