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Re: [Sartre] Understanding Time

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  • praxistence@aol.com
    Actually, Sartre was not a great proponent of free will; he admitted many times in the 50s & 60s that he d altered his views from his B&N period. We re always
    Message 1 of 5 , Dec 30, 2002
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      Actually, Sartre was not a great proponent of free will; he admitted many
      times in the 50s & 60s that he'd altered his views from his B&N period. We're
      always restricted by custom & circumstance. (We can pretend we are not, but
      then that's bad faith.)

      He made the point about Flaubert. Flaubert's bourgeois upbringing left some
      avenues closed to him. Flaubert could've been a mediocre country doctor, he
      could've been a clergyman, & then he could've been, as Sartre said,
      "Flaubert." Sartre also cited in his "Search for Method" the incident of the
      black RAF airplane mechanic who stole a plane, flew across the English
      Channel, & was arrested & court-martialed. In the RAF, a black man could
      never be a pilot, & this was the man's only chance to fly a plane.

      Although we can, as idealists, decry the social restrictions that preclude
      people from fulfilling dreams, it is as Sartre might've said a brute reality
      that such restrictions are made. Should we choose to ignore them & "break the
      law," then we're stuck with the consequence of that action.


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