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Re: [Sartre] Re: Anti-Canadianism

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  • John Foster
    Christopher, Unfortunately you have difficulty with your interlocutors for several reasons. One reason is that you don t appear to be able to take a joke. Who
    Message 1 of 12 , Dec 2, 2002
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      Christopher,

      Unfortunately you have difficulty with your interlocutors for several
      reasons. One reason is that you don't appear to be able to take a joke. Who
      gives a damn about Walmart or Costco here in Canada? I was making a joke.
      Canadian Tire is a Canadian owned public company and it is just as large as
      Walmart practically. The issues you raise are simply classic 'red herrings'
      and in the last message you posted you have even accused Jean Paul Sartre
      for being guilty of anti-americanism (what ever that is supposed to mean).

      Anyone you chose to discredit as 'unamerican' simply are people who you
      claim have the wrong perspective, like Noam Chomsky. Who really cares about
      your opinion? Now you are claiming that Sartre is guilty of bigotry
      too...frankly it seems that you pick out the more 'literary' works of
      Sartre, exclude the philosophical works, like Being and Nothingness (which
      is a very difficult book to understand - you need a good background in
      classical philosophy), and use these snippets to support your own
      intolerance of other ideas and beliefs you think are wrong.


      Christopher Bobo:

      "In fact, with respect to America, I think he was as guilty as the
      Anti-Semites he condemned."

      You are not making any logical sense in your arguments any longer.

      If present trends continue, then it will not be long before Canadian Tire is
      a US company, and soon most of the independent companies will not be
      Canadian any longer here. It is sickening to think what will happen after we
      have lost our sovereignty...and very few Canadians want to become Americans.
      It is the opposite here in North America....There is nothing 'anti-american'
      in this statement. It is entirely a 'pro-Canadian' statement.

      What did that right wing bigot Pat Buchanan say recently about Canadians
      recently? He called us a bunch of "Soviet Canuckastans" who like to "whine"
      and "free load." This was just after the US killed 4 of our ground troops in
      Afghanistan, a few days after the US mistakenly bombed a Afghan family
      wedding with 300 persons.

      -----
    • Leon McQuaid
      who can give me the jist of Being and Nothingness. I have read the flies , dirty hands , no exit , the respectfull prostitute , the wall ,
      Message 2 of 12 , Dec 2, 2002
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        who can give me the jist of Being and Nothingness. I have read 'the flies',
        'dirty hands', 'no exit', 'the respectfull prostitute', 'the wall',
        'Self-deception' and am going to read 'the anti-semite' when exams finish.
        Other than that I dont know what to read of his next. Any suggestions?






        >From: "John Foster" <borealis@...>
        >Reply-To: Sartre@yahoogroups.com
        >To: <Sartre@yahoogroups.com>
        >Subject: Re: [Sartre] Re: Anti-Canadianism
        >Date: Mon, 2 Dec 2002 11:06:00 -0800
        >
        >Christopher,
        >
        >Unfortunately you have difficulty with your interlocutors for several
        >reasons. One reason is that you don't appear to be able to take a joke. Who
        >gives a damn about Walmart or Costco here in Canada? I was making a joke.
        >Canadian Tire is a Canadian owned public company and it is just as large as
        >Walmart practically. The issues you raise are simply classic 'red herrings'
        >and in the last message you posted you have even accused Jean Paul Sartre
        >for being guilty of anti-americanism (what ever that is supposed to mean).
        >
        >Anyone you chose to discredit as 'unamerican' simply are people who you
        >claim have the wrong perspective, like Noam Chomsky. Who really cares about
        >your opinion? Now you are claiming that Sartre is guilty of bigotry
        >too...frankly it seems that you pick out the more 'literary' works of
        >Sartre, exclude the philosophical works, like Being and Nothingness (which
        >is a very difficult book to understand - you need a good background in
        >classical philosophy), and use these snippets to support your own
        >intolerance of other ideas and beliefs you think are wrong.
        >
        >
        >Christopher Bobo:
        >
        >"In fact, with respect to America, I think he was as guilty as the
        >Anti-Semites he condemned."
        >
        >You are not making any logical sense in your arguments any longer.
        >
        >If present trends continue, then it will not be long before Canadian Tire
        >is
        >a US company, and soon most of the independent companies will not be
        >Canadian any longer here. It is sickening to think what will happen after
        >we
        >have lost our sovereignty...and very few Canadians want to become
        >Americans.
        >It is the opposite here in North America....There is nothing
        >'anti-american'
        >in this statement. It is entirely a 'pro-Canadian' statement.
        >
        >What did that right wing bigot Pat Buchanan say recently about Canadians
        >recently? He called us a bunch of "Soviet Canuckastans" who like to "whine"
        >and "free load." This was just after the US killed 4 of our ground troops
        >in
        >Afghanistan, a few days after the US mistakenly bombed a Afghan family
        >wedding with 300 persons.
        >
        >-----
        >


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      • Leon McQuaid
        I ve just finished a Play which is supposed to be heavily influenced my Sartre and Nietzsche. If anyone wants to read it I would love to hear someone elses
        Message 3 of 12 , Dec 2, 2002
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          I've just finished a Play which is supposed to be heavily influenced my
          Sartre and Nietzsche. If anyone wants to read it I would love to hear
          someone elses opion. Keep in mind I did only have a month to work on it.






          >From: "John Foster" <borealis@...>
          >Reply-To: Sartre@yahoogroups.com
          >To: <Sartre@yahoogroups.com>
          >Subject: Re: [Sartre] Re: Anti-Canadianism
          >Date: Mon, 2 Dec 2002 11:06:00 -0800
          >
          >Christopher,
          >
          >Unfortunately you have difficulty with your interlocutors for several
          >reasons. One reason is that you don't appear to be able to take a joke. Who
          >gives a damn about Walmart or Costco here in Canada? I was making a joke.
          >Canadian Tire is a Canadian owned public company and it is just as large as
          >Walmart practically. The issues you raise are simply classic 'red herrings'
          >and in the last message you posted you have even accused Jean Paul Sartre
          >for being guilty of anti-americanism (what ever that is supposed to mean).
          >
          >Anyone you chose to discredit as 'unamerican' simply are people who you
          >claim have the wrong perspective, like Noam Chomsky. Who really cares about
          >your opinion? Now you are claiming that Sartre is guilty of bigotry
          >too...frankly it seems that you pick out the more 'literary' works of
          >Sartre, exclude the philosophical works, like Being and Nothingness (which
          >is a very difficult book to understand - you need a good background in
          >classical philosophy), and use these snippets to support your own
          >intolerance of other ideas and beliefs you think are wrong.
          >
          >
          >Christopher Bobo:
          >
          >"In fact, with respect to America, I think he was as guilty as the
          >Anti-Semites he condemned."
          >
          >You are not making any logical sense in your arguments any longer.
          >
          >If present trends continue, then it will not be long before Canadian Tire
          >is
          >a US company, and soon most of the independent companies will not be
          >Canadian any longer here. It is sickening to think what will happen after
          >we
          >have lost our sovereignty...and very few Canadians want to become
          >Americans.
          >It is the opposite here in North America....There is nothing
          >'anti-american'
          >in this statement. It is entirely a 'pro-Canadian' statement.
          >
          >What did that right wing bigot Pat Buchanan say recently about Canadians
          >recently? He called us a bunch of "Soviet Canuckastans" who like to "whine"
          >and "free load." This was just after the US killed 4 of our ground troops
          >in
          >Afghanistan, a few days after the US mistakenly bombed a Afghan family
          >wedding with 300 persons.
          >
          >-----
          >


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        • Christopher Bobo
          May I suggest that you try The Humanism of Existentialism which appear in an old collection of his essays entitled Essays in Existentialism, or you can find
          Message 4 of 12 , Dec 2, 2002
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            May I suggest that you try "The Humanism of Existentialism" which appear in an old collection of his essays entitled Essays in Existentialism, or you can find a different translation entitled "Existentialism and Humanism" in a more recently published volume entitled Jean-Paul Sartre: Basic Writings, edited by Stephen Priest and published in 2001 by Routledge. I think you would find the latter volume will offer you the greatest exposure in the least number of pages to the depth and scope of Sartre's thinking. Bonne chance!
            ----- Original Message -----
            From: Leon McQuaid
            To: Sartre@yahoogroups.com
            Sent: Monday, December 02, 2002 12:37 PM
            Subject: Re: [Sartre] Re: Anti-Canadianism


            who can give me the jist of Being and Nothingness. I have read 'the flies',
            'dirty hands', 'no exit', 'the respectfull prostitute', 'the wall',
            'Self-deception' and am going to read 'the anti-semite' when exams finish.
            Other than that I dont know what to read of his next. Any suggestions?



            .


            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • John Foster
            That s nice! But a recent poll suggested that Canadians are the rudest travellers in the world. That s because they ask too many questions. I wonder if Sartre
            Message 5 of 12 , Dec 2, 2002
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              That's nice! But a recent poll suggested that Canadians are the rudest
              travellers in the world. That's because they ask too many questions.

              I wonder if Sartre had written anything about Canadians or Quebecers? Grant
              was the only visible philosopher during his time. Did he ever read Grant?

              chao

              john foster

              ----- Original Message -----
              From: <Josh@...>
              To: <Sartre@yahoogroups.com>
              Sent: Monday, December 02, 2002 1:13 PM
              Subject: Fwd: Re: [Sartre] Re: Anti-Canadianism


              > I'm a Yankee who lived in Canada for a while and almost
              > became Canadian.
              > When people ask me what I think the real difference is
              > between Canada and the US I usually say...
              >
              > "If you get raped in a Canadian prison shower, you
              > are virtually guaranteed 'reach around'; they
              > wouldn't think not to provide it."
              >
              > ---- Original message ----
              > >Date: Mon, 2 Dec 2002 11:06:00 -0800
              > >From: "John Foster" <borealis@...>
              > >Subject: Re: [Sartre] Re: Anti-Canadianism
              > >To: <Sartre@yahoogroups.com>
              > >
              > >Christopher,
              > >
              > >Unfortunately you have difficulty with your interlocutors
              > for several
              > >reasons. One reason is that you don't appear to be able to
              > take a joke. Who
              > >gives a damn about Walmart or Costco here in Canada? I was
              > making a joke.
              > >Canadian Tire is a Canadian owned public company and it is
              > just as large as
              > >Walmart practically. The issues you raise are simply
              > classic 'red herrings'
              > >and in the last message you posted you have even accused
              > Jean Paul Sartre
              > >for being guilty of anti-americanism (what ever that is
              > supposed to mean).
              > >
              > >Anyone you chose to discredit as 'unamerican' simply are
              > people who you
              > >claim have the wrong perspective, like Noam Chomsky. Who
              > really cares about
              > >your opinion? Now you are claiming that Sartre is guilty of
              > bigotry
              > >too...frankly it seems that you pick out the
              > more 'literary' works of
              > >Sartre, exclude the philosophical works, like Being and
              > Nothingness (which
              > >is a very difficult book to understand - you need a good
              > background in
              > >classical philosophy), and use these snippets to support
              > your own
              > >intolerance of other ideas and beliefs you think are wrong.
              > >
              > >
              > >Christopher Bobo:
              > >
              > >"In fact, with respect to America, I think he was as guilty
              > as the
              > >Anti-Semites he condemned."
              > >
              > >You are not making any logical sense in your arguments any
              > longer.
              > >
              > >If present trends continue, then it will not be long before
              > Canadian Tire is
              > >a US company, and soon most of the independent companies
              > will not be
              > >Canadian any longer here. It is sickening to think what
              > will happen after we
              > >have lost our sovereignty...and very few Canadians want to
              > become Americans.
              > >It is the opposite here in North America....There is
              > nothing 'anti-american'
              > >in this statement. It is entirely a 'pro-Canadian'
              > statement.
              > >
              > >What did that right wing bigot Pat Buchanan say recently
              > about Canadians
              > >recently? He called us a bunch of "Soviet Canuckastans" who
              > like to "whine"
              > >and "free load." This was just after the US killed 4 of our
              > ground troops in
              > >Afghanistan, a few days after the US mistakenly bombed a
              > Afghan family
              > >wedding with 300 persons.
              > >
              > >-----
              > >
              > >
              > >To unsubscribe, e-mail: Sartre-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
              > >
              > >
              > >Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to
              > http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
              > >
              > >
              >
              > To unsubscribe, e-mail: Sartre-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
              >
              >
              > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
              >
              >
              >
            • John Foster
              That s classic humour. I would like permission to repost that to my uncle and others. Haa Haa. He loves americans too. Actually the same poll -I should mention
              Message 6 of 12 , Dec 2, 2002
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                That's classic humour. I would like permission to repost that to my uncle
                and others. Haa Haa. He loves americans too. Actually the same poll -I
                should mention is that Americans were regarded as one of the most polite -
                they tip the best perhaps! And tips like yours are worth it.

                I hiked the Inca Trail in 1998. I got this cheap flight to Lima courtesy
                America Airlines ($300 Cdn return from Seattle). It was so funny because
                there were 4 Americans with me: a forester from Alaska, a woman from Idaho,
                a ex Brit DJ from New York and another woman from Washington DC, an African
                American who had never been to a developing nation. When we hiked the first
                day the forester had hired 2 porters, Peruvians, to carry all his camera
                equipment. When I arrived at the first summit, about 4500 meters, the
                forester became frantic because the porters who carried his expensive camera
                equipment were not there and they never showed up. He could not speak
                spanish. I went over to speak to him, and I had to console him because he
                was absolutely sure the porter (actually it was a father and son) had stolen
                his lenses worth about 10 years of Peruvian income. I told him that the boy
                had the equipment and there was no possibility that a local Peruvian would
                steal his equipment in broad day light, that it was impossible because the
                locals fear the policia more than anything in the world.

                As it turned out the boy who ported his equipment had been ahead of all us,
                and had been waiting at a pre-arranged wardens cabin only about 20 minutes
                below the pass. The poor forester was so worried that he admitted that he
                did not want anyone to even know that he was American. I told him that was
                the silliest thing that I ever heard because the Peruvians think Americans
                are absolutely wonderful and they all dream of going to America much like
                1.5 million other Peruvians actually have (they actually have that many
                Peruvians between the ages of 21 and 40 who have left for the more developed
                nations of NA and Europe). Anyway, I barely consoled him, but shortly
                afterwards he located his equipment.

                But what was more interesting was the 2 women. The woman from Idaho had
                spent 10 years in Chile, spoke fluent spanish. Her friend did not speak a
                word of spanish, but was immensely happy. She had a bit of scirrocii (high
                elevation sicknes), but that did not deter her enthusiasm. The DJ was there
                to sample what he was most interested in: a species of tropical vine called
                Banistropis, a potent hallucinogen, the vine of death which is used by the
                indigenous peoples in the Amazon rainforest.

                I almost missed my connecting flight to Lima and could have ended up in La
                Paz. They are extremely lax about travel in planes in south america. There
                was an American with this fly fishing vest and fly rod standing in the
                terminal of Cuzco. He was the most lackadaisical guy I ever met. The only
                complaint he had was that he did not catch anything of significance (so he
                said - fishermen are extrement secretive about their best exploits). It was
                so funny too because I met this Italian Canadian woman in Lima after. She
                also went to the rainforest to sample the vine of death. She was beautiful
                and I fell in love on the spot. We corresponded for awhile, but never got to
                meet again. She was also a lawyer who really wanted to be a dancer but her
                mother wanted her to be a lawyer. To bad she could have danced me outside in
                a Canadian prairie winter.

                chao

                john
                ----- Original Message -----
                From: <Josh@...>
                To: <Sartre@yahoogroups.com>
                Sent: Monday, December 02, 2002 4:52 PM
                Subject: Fwd: Re: Re: [Sartre] Re: Anti-Canadianism


                > ---- Original message ----
                > >Date: Mon, 2 Dec 2002 16:31:28 -0800
                > >From: "John Foster" <borealis@...>
                > >Subject: Re: Re: [Sartre] Re: Anti-Canadianism
                > >To: <Sartre@yahoogroups.com>
                > >
                > >That's nice! But a recent poll suggested that Canadians are
                > the rudest
                > >travellers in the world. That's because they ask too many
                > questions.
                >
                > So, they're just like Americans, except that they don't
                > pretend that they already know everything?
                >
                > One thing that Canadians and Americans definitely share is
                > a vague (or not so vague?) sense of unease at the the
                > general perception of Canadians as quasi-American.
                > Canadians deny their unease by insisting that they are
                > different. Americans deny their unease by insisting that
                > they are the same. Both are able to sublimate anxiety over
                > their denial when it comes to pocket change; a point on
                > which their denials are reversed.
                > One of my pipe dreams is to get arrested in Ottawa for
                > pumping quarter-sized (alsmost worthless)
                > Korean coins into parking meters
                > at which are parked U.S. vehicles.
                > I'll give the police my best deer-in-the-headlights
                > Canadian facial expression and say with an air of
                > naive incredulity
                > "But they're basically the same... aren't they?"
                >
                > To unsubscribe, e-mail: Sartre-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
                >
                >
                > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
                >
                >
                >
              • John Foster
                Oh gosh! Being and Nothingness is quite a read. Susan Sontag pointed out that it was heavily influenced by Hegels Phenomenology of Mind. It is true to a
                Message 7 of 12 , Dec 2, 2002
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                  Oh gosh! Being and Nothingness is quite a read. Susan Sontag pointed out
                  that it was heavily influenced by Hegels' Phenomenology of Mind. It is true
                  to a certain extent, but not entirely. That damn text is hard to read
                  without losing the 'thread' so to speak. First of all, there are the basic
                  definitions and analysis which are purely based on classical philosophy - I
                  recently posted the item on intuition, that according to Sartre "all
                  knowledge is intuitive" and that is correct, reason and logic are only
                  instruments which are used to arrive at an intuition. Sartre fails to
                  elaborate extensively on intuition, and that is a problem. The idea of
                  transcendence is problematic because it is not exactly the same idea that
                  Kant elaborated on in his idea of transcendence and neither is ti similar to
                  what Husserl analyzed as transcendence.

                  I think the feature most prominent in Being'N'othingness is about something
                  more 'intimate' and 'personal'. For instance most of the examples for 'bad
                  faith', mauvaise habitude, refer to 'sociological examples' arising from the
                  observation of Sartres "others" who may be simply 'lying to themselves'
                  because they have to;there is 'no exit'. Sartre examples are almost 'one
                  dimensional' but they are credible, to the point of being social
                  'archetypes'. His exceptions are always literary characters like Genet,
                  Baudelaire, but I have to confess I have not read Baudelaire. Being and
                  Nothingness is a work which type casts all human relations in a 'either/or'
                  confessional format.

                  There is one section in Being and Nothingness where Sartre exposes the
                  contradictions of the ancient Chinese civilization, which over a period of
                  2-3 thousand years were engaged in a unconscious program of deforestation
                  resulting in a serious problem with flooding and soil erosion. He refers to
                  a famous French soil ecologist who wrote about catastrophic flooding in
                  China. He indicated that the 'being-in-itself' of the ecology of disturbance
                  (massive deforestation) was disclosed to the average Chinese peasant. They
                  could not possibly have seen what was happening as a result of
                  deforestation. What Sartre is actually saying is that the catastrophe failed
                  to be recognized because there was a lack, a clear lack of scientific
                  recognition, that land use practices carried out over a large area were
                  impacting the hydrological functions of cleared forest in an 'incremental
                  fashion', a death by a thousand blows.

                  In each of the examples of 'mauvaise habitude' there is an a prior
                  assumption that the individual or case under consideration is not cognizant
                  of the potential and capacity for personal change that is required; the
                  characters are caught so to speak in their own social milieu; they do not
                  know how to act authentically. Many of the overt sexual encounters are
                  similar to the Chinese soils account. There is this erosion of possibility
                  for freedom in many cases. Sartre in Being and Nothingness, perhaps his most
                  interesting accounts, relate often to personal relations, this is what Susan
                  Sontag suggests too; the sexual relations are the most interesting but then
                  again Sontag assserts that philosophy is an account of 'jerking off the
                  universe' and not much else (good stuff hey!). That first 'encounter'...is
                  paramount in his description of mauvaise habitude. That is interesting
                  because Sartre is suggesting that the first encounter between strangers is
                  'emblamatic' at several levels, but Sartre does not elaborate on his own
                  idea of an authentic first encounter whether with Simone nor with a third
                  party, which many may know of (the young female protogee of both Simone and
                  Jean Paul). There is something interesting in Being and Nothingness which is
                  highly personal and it must refer to this third person, the young woman who
                  both Jean Paul and Simone befriend. Simone and Jean Paul never cohabited.
                  But they did spend all their free time together. If Jean Paul had any source
                  for something other than 'authenticity' then it would be in regards to the
                  'third party' in their own 'menage a trois', right? The allusions to bad
                  faith in Being and Nothingness are actually drawn from hypothetical social
                  characters, but not from their own meetings (we cannot suppose that Sartre
                  was writting only when he sat in a smokey french cafe drinking Pernod, and
                  rolling smoke wisps from exhaled Galouise). They are 'wall coverings',
                  shallow and remotely valid, but believeable in any case, however; without a
                  suitable contrast (which was clearly there in Simone de Beauvoirs
                  biography), there could not be a Being and Nothingness. You need to know
                  what is 'good faith' in order know what is 'bad faith', right? The most
                  natural dialectic would have to arise from a 'affine relationship' of
                  primordial being and nothingness; Sartres most significant other was his
                  mother, and he was the only son. No dad was around at all. And we cannot
                  always obtain that ideal of good faith from peers and parents, after all
                  Sartre maintained that the best thing which ever happened to him was that he
                  'did not have a father'. True enough, a true mother lover to the end. I love
                  my mother too. Men prefigure as sort of 'power brokers' for Sartre, much
                  like the priest for Carl Jung (scared the heck out of him). Some authority
                  figure for Sartre must have 'magical power' for him, have the power to
                  'command' and requisition 'obeyance'. If we read St. Genet, then we can know
                  exactly what is meant here. The moment that the young Genet is caught
                  stealing a kitchen knife in the home of his parents is the day he recognizes
                  who exactly he is, the thief eternal. For Sartre I believe there was
                  'recognition too' and I don't think it was the day he learned that he did
                  not have a dad, but rather it was a different day. A day when he learned
                  about this 'third woman'; afterall he never had more than one mother, now
                  there were three: Simone and the other, a third...We never learned anything
                  about the third had it not been for Simone, why?

                  For that matter, why did we never learn anything about Hiedeggers protegee,
                  student and lover, Hannah Arendt?

                  But he was a good walley'd filosofer, No?

                  Our greatest export to America was Rich Little. Just ask Philus Diller who
                  reasoned: he is a man, I am a girl, and we are both comedians.

                  chao

                  john foster
                • Tommy Beavitt
                  ... Leon, If you wish to disseminate your work to this group I suggest you post it to the files section at http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Sartre/ You can t
                  Message 8 of 12 , Dec 3, 2002
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                    At 4:56 pm -0400 2/12/02, Leon McQuaid wrote:
                    >I've just finished a Play which is supposed to be heavily influenced my
                    >Sartre and Nietzsche. If anyone wants to read it I would love to hear
                    >someone elses opion. Keep in mind I did only have a month to work on it.

                    Leon,

                    If you wish to disseminate your work to this group I suggest you post
                    it to the 'files' section at http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Sartre/

                    You can't send attachments to this list (for obvious reasons)

                    all the best

                    Tommy Beavitt
                  • rogelio braga
                    Leon McQuaid: I would love to read your work. I am also writing plays (but not the Sartre and the rest of the gang type.) I hope, with your play, I can learn
                    Message 9 of 12 , Dec 3, 2002
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                      Leon McQuaid:

                      I would love to read your work. I am also writing
                      plays (but not the Sartre and the rest of the gang
                      type.) I hope, with your play, I can learn more about
                      the craft. Thanks.

                      Rogelio Braga

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                    • Leon McQuaid
                      well I am no profesional but I like my play. I cant figure out how to use yahoo to post it though! ...
                      Message 10 of 12 , Dec 3, 2002
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                        well I am no profesional but I like my play. I cant figure out how to use
                        yahoo to post it though!







                        >From: rogelio braga <ogiebraga@...>
                        >Reply-To: Sartre@yahoogroups.com
                        >To: Sartre@yahoogroups.com
                        >Subject: [Sartre] Leon McQuaid
                        >Date: Tue, 3 Dec 2002 17:07:53 -0800 (PST)
                        >
                        >Leon McQuaid:
                        >
                        >I would love to read your work. I am also writing
                        >plays (but not the Sartre and the rest of the gang
                        >type.) I hope, with your play, I can learn more about
                        >the craft. Thanks.
                        >
                        >Rogelio Braga
                        >
                        >__________________________________________________
                        >Do you Yahoo!?
                        >Yahoo! Mail Plus - Powerful. Affordable. Sign up now.
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                      • Vasilis, June E (June)
                        Leon, Me too. Best, June ... From: rogelio braga [mailto:ogiebraga@yahoo.com] Sent: Tuesday, December 03, 2002 8:08 PM To: Sartre@yahoogroups.com Subject:
                        Message 11 of 12 , Dec 3, 2002
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                          Leon,
                          Me too.
                          Best,
                          June
                          -----Original Message-----
                          From: rogelio braga [mailto:ogiebraga@...]
                          Sent: Tuesday, December 03, 2002 8:08 PM
                          To: Sartre@yahoogroups.com
                          Subject: [Sartre] Leon McQuaid


                          Leon McQuaid:

                          I would love to read your work. I am also writing
                          plays (but not the Sartre and the rest of the gang
                          type.) I hope, with your play, I can learn more about
                          the craft. Thanks.

                          Rogelio Braga

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                        • praxistence@aol.com
                          I would try to get hold of Sartre s Search for Method. He wrote it originally in 1957 for a Polish journal & revised it later for publication. In Search,
                          Message 12 of 12 , Dec 11, 2002
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                            I would try to get hold of Sartre's "Search for Method." He wrote it
                            originally in 1957 for a Polish journal & revised it later for publication.
                            In "Search," he explains his progressive-regressive method for finding the
                            purpose or truth of history.

                            Sartre pretty much devoted the rest of his writing life to employing this
                            progressive-regressive method, whether in his two volumes on dialectical
                            reason or in his massive "Flaubert."


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