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re: close reading of emotions

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  • gsevans@ti.cz
    ...It would seem, first and foremost, that the effect of such an interpretation is to make consciousness into a thing in relation to what is signified: it is
    Message 1 of 4 , Feb 4, 2000
      "...It would seem,
      first and foremost, that the effect of such an interpretation is to make
      consciousness into a thing in relation to what is signified: it is to admit
      that consciousness can constitute itself into a meaning without being aware
      of the meaning that it constitutes. There is a flagrant contradiction in
      this, unless we are to regard consciousness as an existent of the same type
      as a stone, or a pond ..."

      And yet, isn't this just the thrust of most theories of psychology, both in
      in the university and also among practitioneers? That the human psyche
      is something to be analyzed like a stone or cell; where the idea is to
      determine its chemical composition, its genetic makeup, its "formative"
      experiences, and after the gathering of such empirical data
      (accomplished in a few hour long sessions) prescribe
      treatment to "cure" the subject?
    • DJRNews@aol.com
      In a message dated 4/2/00 6:54pm GMT Standard Time, gsevans@ti.cz writes:
      Message 2 of 4 , Feb 4, 2000
        In a message dated 4/2/00 6:54pm GMT Standard Time, gsevans@... writes:

        << And yet, isn't this just the thrust of most theories of psychology, both
        in in the university and also among practitioneers? That the human psyche is
        something to be analyzed like a stone or cell; where the idea is to
        determine its chemical composition, its genetic makeup, its "formative"
        experiences, and after the gathering of such empirical data (accomplished in
        a few hour long sessions) prescribe treatment to "cure" the subject? >>

        I'm not sure whether you're referring to the kind of empirical psychology
        done in universities or to psychoanalytic psychotherapy. You seem to run the
        two together.
        Much of modern psychoanalytic theory has (since the sixties) been
        positively influenced by the kind of criticisms raised by Sartre and other
        philosophers. The charge of reification might still stick but I think it is
        now much harder to support. As far as I can see all of the counsellors and
        therapists I work with self-consciously avoid using the "treatment-cure"
        vocabulary of the "medical model" of the mind. Assessment in
        insight-oriented therapy is generally an ongoing process and certainly takes
        more than "a few hour long sessions."

        Don.

        ________________________________________
        You are invited to visit the following websites:

        Jean-Paul Sartre Homepage - <A HREF="www.sartre.org.uk">Click here</A>
        Hypnosis & Hypnotherapy UK - <A
        HREF="http://members.aol.com/DonJohnR/Hypnosis/Hypnohome.html">Click here</A>
        Psychoanalysis UK - <A HREF="http://members.aol.com/DonJohnR/Freud/main.html">
        Click here</A>
        Philosophy & Counselling UK - <A
        HREF="http://members.aol.com/DonJohnR/PhilCouns/PhilCouns.html">Click here</A>
        Merton YAP Drugs Project - <A HREF="www.yap.org.uk">Click here</A>
      • gsevans@ti.cz
        Don wrote: Much of modern psychoanalytic theory has (since the sixties) been positively influenced by the kind of criticisms raised by Sartre and other
        Message 3 of 4 , Feb 5, 2000
          Don wrote: "Much of modern psychoanalytic theory has (since the sixties) been
          positively influenced by the kind of criticisms raised by Sartre and other
          philosophers. The charge of reification might still stick but I think it is
          now much harder to support. As far as I can see all of the counsellors and
          therapists I work with self-consciously avoid using the "treatment-cure"
          vocabulary of the "medical model" of the mind. Assessment in
          insight-oriented therapy is generally an ongoing process and certainly takes
          more than "a few hour long sessions."



          My experience at working in an adjunct position at a "mental health" facility
          (though really it was just a standard counselling facility which in no way
          handled serious psychiatric problems such as schizophrenia)
          in the late 1980's in Chicago showed the medical model to be alive and well; the
          lone, isolated Rogerian intern seemed to regard the medical model as a constant
          problem in the various places he'd worked. I had the sense that insurance
          companies were, in part, responsible for this -- as they pay for more and more of the
          mental health costs in the U.S. they demand that conditions be diagnosed in a quantifiable
          manner. Therefore each patient was diagnosed, given a DSMIII code to indicate the
          nature of their malady, and these codes, in my experience, took on a life of
          their own in just the way Sartre describes in the current reading -- in forming
          an "objective" diagnostic tool, they allowed the therapists to treat the patients
          (and yes, that what they were called) as a set of symptoms, a set of exterior
          signs that were analyzed according to the code and treated accordingly.
        • DJRNews@aol.com
          In a message dated 5/2/00 6:03pm GMT Standard Time, gsevans@ti.cz writes:
          Message 4 of 4 , Feb 5, 2000
            In a message dated 5/2/00 6:03pm GMT Standard Time, gsevans@... writes:

            << My experience at working in an adjunct position at a "mental health"
            facility (though really it was just a standard counselling facility which in
            no way handled serious psychiatric problems such as schizophrenia) in the
            late 1980's in Chicago showed the medical model to be alive and well >>

            Still, that was in a mental health institution in America, twenty years
            ago... I think the climate in the UK (where I live and work) is very
            different. Also, aren't the vast majority of counsellors working outside of
            institutions like this, either privately or for independent charity
            organisations? I think they are in the UK.

            <<the lone, isolated Rogerian intern>>

            According to the British Association of Counsellors, just under half of their
            national membership describe themselves as "humanistic", which I take it
            means that they follow theorists like Rogers in rejecting the medical model.
            My knowlledge of the counselling training courses available in this country
            is that most of them are not based on the medical-model. (I actually don't
            know any counsellors or therapists who have been trained in this way).

            <>

            Again, I think the situation in America seems more geared toward the medical
            model than here in Europe.

            Don.
            ________________________________________
            You are invited to visit the following websites:

            Jean-Paul Sartre Homepage - <A HREF="www.sartre.org.uk">Click here</A>
            Hypnosis & Hypnotherapy UK - <A
            HREF="http://members.aol.com/DonJohnR/Hypnosis/Hypnohome.html">Click here</A>
            Psychoanalysis UK - <A HREF="http://members.aol.com/DonJohnR/Freud/main.html">
            Click here</A>
            Philosophy & Counselling UK - <A
            HREF="http://members.aol.com/DonJohnR/PhilCouns/PhilCouns.html">Click here</A>
            Merton YAP Drugs Project - <A HREF="www.yap.org.uk">Click here</A>
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