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Re: [Sartre] (unknown)

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  • David Kovar
    I think that from Hegel it can be learned that it does not matter if Sartre wrote it or not. What matters is that history gave it importance. If Sartre did not
    Message 1 of 33 , Aug 25, 2001

      I think that from Hegel it can be learned that it does not matter if Sartre wrote it or not.  What matters is that history gave it importance.  If Sartre did not write it, it would change all the meaning it does/coulde has/had.  This isn't literature or history group.  We are discussing existentialist ideas.  At least I hope.

      >From: "Michael (Mickey) Posluns"
      >Reply-To: Sartre@yahoogroups.com
      >To: Sartre@yahoogroups.com
      >Subject: Re: [Sartre] (unknown)
      >Date: Sat, 25 Aug 2001 16:19:36 -0400
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > > New
      > > evidence suggests this even further Proffesor Kate Fulbrook in 'Beavoir and
      > > Sartre rewriting the myth' show's how Sartre's key theory in being for
      > > other's 'unrealizable's' is taken from Simone's mind. Is he as Fulbrook
      > > quotes the "precocious plagarist"?.
      >
      >If you spelled the word you might have meant then he might or might not be one. I doubt that Sartre was a "plagarist" unless you mean that he wished a plague on both your houses.
      >
      >It is simply silly to say that one person plagiarized (if that is what you meant) from another's mind. Writing is writing. Thinking is thinking. And conversing is neither one nor the other. If
      >he copied something de Beauvoir had written and claimed it as his own this would be plagiarism of the kind that leads to the suspension of an undergraduate. If he had a conversation with his long
      >time companion and the conversation influenced his writing this is how the intellectual process usually works.
      >
      > > I am sure you will all disagree as of
      > > course jp went into much more detail in BN than simone in her fiction.
      >
      >The expression "the devil is in the details" is not about theology but about the printer's devil, i.e., the one who worries about finding all the individual characters after a master printer has
      >laid out a page. Going into details is what makes all the difference. The newspaper is full of possibly interesting social science hypotheses every day. Social scientists pick up a few and do
      >the detailed study that is beyond the scope of the journalist.
      >
      > > Michael Whuzits
      >
      > > --
      >
      >"Even war seldom shows as large a percentage of fatalities as does the education system we have imposed upon our Indian wards."...
      >Saturday Night magazine, November 23, 1907, on the report of Dr. P.H. Bryce,
      >Chief Medical Officer, Indian Affairs Branch.
      >
      >"How long will you judge unjustly, and show partiality toward the wicked? Do justice to the poor and fatherless, deal righteously with the afflicted and destitute. Rescue the poor and needy;
      >save them from the hand of the wicked." (A Psalm of Asaph, The Psalm for the Third Day.)
      >
      >How can we be sure that the unexamined life is not worth living?
      >
      >Michael W. Posluns,
      >The Still Waters Group,
      >First Nations Relations & Public Policy
      >
      >Daytime: 416 995-8613
      >Evening: 416 656-8613
      >Fax: 416 656-2715
      >
      >36 Lauder Avenue,
      >Toronto, Ontario,
      >M6H 3E3
      >
      >


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    • Niel Kenmuir
      I disagree. When you find parts of B&N hard to follow, don t spend an hour struggling through a couple of paragraphs, instead do try to read through like it
      Message 33 of 33 , Nov 16 12:31 PM
        I disagree. When you find parts of B&N hard to follow, don't spend an hour
        struggling through a couple of paragraphs, instead do try to read through
        like it were a novel. Sartre often repeats himself, saying one thing in a
        variety of ways. An idea that you didn't pick up on at first you may well
        pick up on later. Also, if you are having trouble read it in conjunction
        with some secondary literature. Arthur C. Danto's book "Sartre" is good for
        begginers, and there is also Catalano's excellent "A Commentary on Jean-Paul
        Sartre's Being and Nothingness" to help you out.


        >From: "Paul" Reply-To: Sartre@yahoogroups.com To: Sartre@yahoogroups.com
        >Subject: [Sartre] (unknown) Date: Sun, 16 Nov 2003 03:03:41 -0000
        >
        >its probably not a great idea to pick it up and read it like a novel...
        >
        >Try reading the sections that interest you... i find it hard to believe
        >that anyone who understood Sartre's thoughts on action and the origin of
        >nothingness could find it boring.
        >
        >If you are finding the terminology hard, don't skip over words you don't
        >understand, don't gloss over a sentence, make sure you understand every
        >word otherwise its pointless...
        >
        >Paul
        >

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