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Concept of God in Buddhism

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  • vincent johan
    Dear Venerable Monks, I recently read an article about concept of God in Buddhism. According to that article concept of God in Buddhism is the one in Kuddhaka
    Message 1 of 2 , Oct 15, 2005
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      Dear Venerable Monks,

      I recently read an article about concept of God in Buddhism. According to that article concept of God in Buddhism is the one in Kuddhaka Nikaya, Ud VIII. 3.

      Is it true? Because when I read that sutta, I understand it as a Sutta about Condition of Nibbana and not about God. Please explain.

      Thank you for your kindness.


      ---------------------------------
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      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Bhikkhu Pesala
      I have written articles along those lines for the benefit of those brought up to believe in God. Buddhists are not materialists who don t believe in anything
      Message 2 of 2 , Nov 22, 2005
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        I have written articles along those lines for the benefit of those
        brought up to believe in God. Buddhists are not materialists who don't
        believe in anything beyond the commonly observable senses. I wrote:
        *****
        If one asks a Buddhist, "Does God exist" a Buddhist should answer, "It
        depends what you mean by God."

        My explanation would be, "If, by God, you mean something transcending
        the material realm, which is eternal, real, and that can be
        experienced by the wise, then I would say that there is."

        However, if, by God, you mean a supreme being who controls the destiny
        of individuals, who created the world and all beings in it, and who
        will judge those beings after their death, then I would say "That is
        not God, but the law of kamma decides the destiny of beings after
        death."
        ***
        While this doesn't acknowledge the existence of any Creator God, it
        does affirm the belief in something transcendent. Nibbana is not of
        this world. It cannot be seen, heard, smelt, tasted, or touched, nor
        can it be known by the ordinary unenlightened person. However, it can
        be known by the extraordinary diligent meditator who has developed his
        or her mind sufficiently. The ordinary person can infer its existence
        from the words of the Buddha in the Udana that you refer to. Those
        thoughts also occurred to him while he was still an unenlightened
        ordinary bodhisatta, before he attained nibbana. Later he confirmed it
        by his own personal experience.
        ***
        "There is, monks, the unborn, unbecome, uncreated, and unconditioned.
        If there were not the unborn, unbecome, uncreated, and uncondtioned,
        it would not be possible to point out the born, become, created, and
        conditioned. Because, monks, there is the unborn, unbecome, unmade,
        and unconditioned, therefore the refuge from the born, become,
        created, and conditioned can be pointed out." (Udäna viii.3)
        ***

        --- In SanghaOnline@yahoogroups.com, vincent johan <vinzjo@y...>
        wrote:
        >
        > Dear Venerable Monks,
        >
        > I recently read an article about concept of God in Buddhism.
        According to that article concept of God in Buddhism is the one in
        Kuddhaka Nikaya, Ud VIII. 3.
        >
        > Is it true? Because when I read that sutta, I understand it as a
        Sutta about Condition of Nibbana and not about God. Please explain.
        >
        > Thank you for your kindness.
        >
        >
        > ---------------------------------
        > Yahoo! Music Unlimited - Access over 1 million songs. Try it free.
        >
        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        >
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