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Noting in Vipassana Meditation

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  • jhun_kam
    Dear Bhantes and friends, I ve been practising Vipassana meditation(no teachers, only ebooks and articles) for quite a time now, encouraged after reading
    Message 1 of 2 , Apr 6, 2005
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      Dear Bhantes and friends,

      I've been practising Vipassana meditation(no teachers, only ebooks and
      articles) for quite a time now, encouraged after reading 'mindfulness
      in plain english by Bhante G'. It's written there that noting things
      that arise in meditation, such as pain, wandering minds, lust, etc.
      It's said that noting is different from thinking.

      In my practice, if i feel pain, i think (say words in my mind) pain ..
      pain .. pain, and if i find out that my mind's been wandering, i will
      say it again in my head, wandering .. wandering .. wandering, and
      focus again to the breath sensation at the tip of the nose.

      Is this kind of 'noting', when i saying these things in my head, wrong
      ? I've tried to stop this kind of noting, but it seems that i need
      words in my head to be really sure that i noted it. The same things
      actually happen more intensely while doing walking meditation. I keep
      saying 'want to lift, lifting, moving it forward, want to drop,
      dropping, pressing' in words in my head.

      Please teach me T-T

      Thank you in advance,
      With Metta,
      Albert Kam
    • Bhikkhu Pesala
      Hi Albert, Yes, the noting is helpful for being mindful. Making a mental note is the jhana factor called vitakka (initial application), which pushes the mind
      Message 2 of 2 , Apr 8, 2005
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        Hi Albert,

        Yes, the noting is helpful for being mindful. Making a mental note is the
        jhana factor called vitakka (initial application), which pushes the mind
        towards the object. As you discovered, if you fail to note, you find it
        difficult to be aware at all of what is going on, and the mind just
        wanders. If we note the wandering mind, after a while the mind usually
        stops wandering.

        Later, when concentration develops, this mental noting will be unnecessary
        and will naturally be replaced with vicara (sustained application) when
        the mind remains absorbed on whatever the current meditation object
        happens to be.

        Bhikkhu Pesala
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