Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

how many errors?

Expand Messages
  • Mike
    Dear Venerable Monks, Recently I was walking near my home doing a chore when I suddenly felt an object hit the back of my neck. Startled, I grabbed for the
    Message 1 of 2 , Jun 9, 2004
    • 0 Attachment
      Dear Venerable Monks,

      Recently I was walking near my home doing a chore when I suddenly
      felt an object hit the back of my neck. Startled, I grabbed for the
      object and then found it to be a small beatle, a "lady bug".
      Regretting the action I checked to see if it was alright but found it
      to have damaged wings. I observed it some more and percieved that it
      was struggling, suffering.
      I accept that I have committed an offence and broken a precept by my
      lack of mindfulness. If I had only paused before reacting I would not
      have injured this being. I am very sorry for this. But I fear my
      transgressions do not end there. I felt responsibilty for this tiny
      creatures suffering and did not wish it to suffer any longer. I
      reluctantly decided that I should end it's life to end the suffering
      I had caused.
      I asked it's forgiveness and explained my reasoning and said a prayer
      that it may be reborn as a higher life form.
      Was this final action even worse than the first? I felt I took it's
      life out of compassion, but am I just deluded in this? Is "mercy
      killing" wrong? What would the Buddha have said?
    • Bhikkhu Pesala
      Only one, the error of ignorance. Injuring the insect was not breaking the precept, nor unwholesome kamma, as that was not the intention. Killing the insect
      Message 2 of 2 , Jun 11, 2004
      • 0 Attachment
        Only one, the error of ignorance.
        Injuring the insect was not breaking the precept, nor unwholesome kamma,
        as that was not the intention. Killing the insect was both breaking the
        precept, and unwholesome kamma because the intention was to kill.

        See Venerable Mahasi Sayadaw's article on "Mercy Killing" and vivisection:

        The first intention is compassionate and wholesome, but the second is
        cruel and unwholesome. You already thought this was so, hence your doubts
        and question. To be mindful always to avoid injuring or hurting other
        beings is ideal, but very hard to achieve. Even the Buddha was hated by
        some because of what he said.

        If we monks preach the truth that many people do not wish to hear, they
        make unwholesome kamma by bearing ill-will towards us. "Do not drink
        intoxicants, do not indulge in sensual pleasures, get up early, study
        hard, meditate strenuously." Such admonishments are unpopular these days,
        but we should not be silent. If we only flatter people by praising their
        generosity and virtues we may be popular, but those who listen to us will
        miss the true Dhamma. They will accumlate potential for wealth and
        prosperity, but not for insight and liberation from attachment.

        http://www.aimwell.org/Books/Library/Mahasi/Problems/problems.
        html#Euthanasia
      Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.