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bhikku and money

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  • palidhamma
    Dear Venelables, During my stay in Myanmar ,I was surprised to see some bhikkus in Myanmar touch money with his hands and pay it for his shoppings. Then I
    Message 1 of 3 , May 28 8:00 PM
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      Dear Venelables,


      During my stay in Myanmar ,I was surprised to see some bhikkus in
      Myanmar touch money with his hands and pay it for his shoppings.

      Then I asked one bhikku there if it is ok . He answered ," No
      problem. I touch money without any lobha."

      I do not have texts on vinaya at hand. So could you please teach me
      if pali vinaya allows theravadin bhikkus to touch money or not?


      Thank you.
    • Bhikkhu Pesala
      Touching money is not always wrong, in some circumstances a bhikkhu must touch it, but money is not in any way allowable for bhikkhus. If one accepts it, owns
      Message 2 of 3 , May 29 8:14 AM
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        Touching money is not always wrong, in some circumstances a bhikkhu must
        touch it, but money is not in any way allowable for bhikkhus. If one
        accepts it, owns it, or uses it then one has attachment to it, no matter
        what one may claim.

        If a lay person drops or forgets some money or other valuables in the
        monastery, and a bhikkhu sees it, he must pick it up or have someone pick
        it up, to deposit in a safe place until the owner returns for it.

        If a bhikkhu accepts money, even unknowingly, it is to be forfeited to the
        Sangha, and an offence should be confessed. At least four monks must be
        convened, and the bhikkhu must give it up to the Sangha. If a lay person
        is present the elder of the Sangha tells the lay person to dispose of it.
        The lay person can then do with whatever he wishes. If he knows what is
        suitable, he may ask the monks what they need. By this means the monks can
        consent to what is allowable for monks, but the monk who received and gave
        up the money can have no share of what was bought with it.

        If no lay person is present, the Sangha must appoint a trustworthy elder
        to dispose of the money. He must then take it outside the boundary of the
        monastery and throw it away, taking no note of where it falls, thinking,
        "whoever sees it can take it away."

        If money is offered to a bhikkhu he should say, "Money is not allowable
        for bhikkhus. We can accept only what is allowable at the proper time" or
        words to that effect. If the lay person then asks what is allowable, the
        bhikkhu can say what he needs. However, if the lay person does not ask,
        the bhikkhu cannot say, "Money is not allowable, but such and such is
        allowable for bhikkhus or buy this or that." If he obtains a robe or other
        allowable requisites in that way, it must also be forfeited, and an
        offence confessed. However, in this case, since the requisites are
        allowable for bhikkhus, they can be returned to him or used by other
        monks. They do not need to be thrown away as is the case with money.

        http://www.aimwell.org/Books/Library/Pesala/More___/Money/money.html
      • palidhamma
        Ven pesala Thank you very much for your letter. I can understand well the principle idea. Your website is of great help ,too. from palidhamma ... must ... one
        Message 3 of 3 , May 30 3:57 AM
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          Ven pesala

          Thank you very much for your letter.

          I can understand well the principle idea.

          Your website is of great help ,too.

          from palidhamma


          --- In SanghaOnline@yahoogroups.com, "Bhikkhu Pesala" <pesala@a...>
          wrote:
          > Touching money is not always wrong, in some circumstances a bhikkhu
          must
          > touch it, but money is not in any way allowable for bhikkhus. If
          one
          > accepts it, owns it, or uses it then one has attachment to it, no
          matter
          > what one may claim.
          >
          > If a lay person drops or forgets some money or other valuables in
          the
          > monastery, and a bhikkhu sees it, he must pick it up or have
          someone pick
          > it up, to deposit in a safe place until the owner returns for it.
          >
          > If a bhikkhu accepts money, even unknowingly, it is to be forfeited
          to the
          > Sangha, and an offence should be confessed. At least four monks
          must be
          > convened, and the bhikkhu must give it up to the Sangha. If a lay
          person
          > is present the elder of the Sangha tells the lay person to dispose
          of it.
          > The lay person can then do with whatever he wishes. If he knows
          what is
          > suitable, he may ask the monks what they need. By this means the
          monks can
          > consent to what is allowable for monks, but the monk who received
          and gave
          > up the money can have no share of what was bought with it.
          >
          > If no lay person is present, the Sangha must appoint a trustworthy
          elder
          > to dispose of the money. He must then take it outside the boundary
          of the
          > monastery and throw it away, taking no note of where it falls,
          thinking,
          > "whoever sees it can take it away."
          >
          > If money is offered to a bhikkhu he should say, "Money is not
          allowable
          > for bhikkhus. We can accept only what is allowable at the proper
          time" or
          > words to that effect. If the lay person then asks what is
          allowable, the
          > bhikkhu can say what he needs. However, if the lay person does not
          ask,
          > the bhikkhu cannot say, "Money is not allowable, but such and such
          is
          > allowable for bhikkhus or buy this or that." If he obtains a robe
          or other
          > allowable requisites in that way, it must also be forfeited, and an
          > offence confessed. However, in this case, since the requisites are
          > allowable for bhikkhus, they can be returned to him or used by
          other
          > monks. They do not need to be thrown away as is the case with
          money.
          >
          > http://www.aimwell.org/Books/Library/Pesala/More___/Money/money.html
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