Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Hi, Im new here and a question...

Expand Messages
  • grusic
    Dear Venerable Monks, I just wanted to say hello, introduce myself, express my gratitude to the organizers of the list and ask a question. I m Bill Gray, a 41
    Message 1 of 3 , Feb 3, 2004
    • 0 Attachment
      Dear Venerable Monks,

      I just wanted to say hello, introduce myself, express my gratitude
      to the organizers of the list and ask a question.

      I'm Bill Gray, a 41 year old AfroAmerican man currently living in New
      Zealand and practicing Buddhist for 13 years.

      I started off in the Nichiren Shu traditon and recently migrated
      over to the Theravada. I'm glad I made the switch.

      I'd also like to express my gratitude to the panel of monks for being
      involved in the list. Thank you all very much.

      Now, on to the question. How does one accurately guage one's level of
      attainment along the path to Enlightenment?

      I am currently awaiting the arrival of a copy of Bhadantacariya Buddhaghosa's Visuddhimagga, the Path of Purification which may help to answer the question, but until then I would appreciate an answer from one of the Venerables.

      Please don't confuse the frequent use of the word "I" as a clinging to
      self. I, yes that word again, use it for expedient conversation.

      May you all be happy and well,
      Bill
    • Sayadaw Nanda Siddhi
      Dear Bill, Let me try to mention a bit of your concern. The level of the attainment of the Enlightenment could be known by the way of how does one practise on
      Message 2 of 3 , Feb 5, 2004
      • 0 Attachment
        Dear Bill,
        Let me try to mention a bit of your concern.
        The level of the attainment of the Enlightenment could be known by the way
        of how does one practise on his life. There are defilements, which have been
        eradicated by the attainment of the Enlightenment.
        For first state of attainment, Wrong View and Doubt are totally eradicated,
        that person can be called Sotapanna . Second state of attainment, all of the
        defilements is subsidized to get lower gauge, that person can be called
        Sakadagami. In the third state of the attainment sensual desire and anger
        are totally eradicated that person can be called Anagami. In the final state
        of the attainment of the Enlightenment, all the defilement are totally
        eradicated that person can be called Araham who has no more any defilement.
        Let say a person says he is first state of attainment as Sotapanna, we can
        concern about that whether he still has wrong view and doubts. If clear it
        is possible. Let say you practice your self you think you attain any level
        of the Enlightenment, you can check yourself whether there are eradicated
        defilements still get or not. For example after attainment of the 3rd state
        still get angry, that means your attainment is not real or true.
        These Dhamma Theory are inside the book, which you have. You can learn
        slowly. Learn the Dhamma must take your time. Read, think, analyze. If
        satisfy then accept it. If it is not satisfying some more need to learn and
        study.
        With metta,
        Nandasiddhi.



        >From: "grusic" <grusic@...>
        >Reply-To: SanghaOnline@yahoogroups.com
        >To: SanghaOnline@yahoogroups.com
        >Subject: [SanghaOnline] Hi, Im new here and a question...
        >Date: Wed, 04 Feb 2004 05:27:07 -0000
        >
        >Dear Venerable Monks,
        >
        >I just wanted to say hello, introduce myself, express my gratitude
        >to the organizers of the list and ask a question.
        >
        >I'm Bill Gray, a 41 year old AfroAmerican man currently living in New
        >Zealand and practicing Buddhist for 13 years.
        >
        >I started off in the Nichiren Shu traditon and recently migrated
        >over to the Theravada. I'm glad I made the switch.
        >
        >I'd also like to express my gratitude to the panel of monks for being
        >involved in the list. Thank you all very much.
        >
        >Now, on to the question. How does one accurately guage one's level of
        >attainment along the path to Enlightenment?
        >
        >I am currently awaiting the arrival of a copy of Bhadantacariya
        >Buddhaghosa's Visuddhimagga, the Path of Purification which may help to
        >answer the question, but until then I would appreciate an answer from one
        >of the Venerables.
        >
        >Please don't confuse the frequent use of the word "I" as a clinging to
        >self. I, yes that word again, use it for expedient conversation.
        >
        >May you all be happy and well,
        >Bill
        >
        >

        _________________________________________________________________
        The new MSN 8: smart spam protection and 2 months FREE*
        http://join.msn.com/?page=features/junkmail
      • Bhikkhu Pesala
        It is tempting to answer this kind of question with something clever like, If you re really advanced, you no longer try to measure your progress or Don t
        Message 3 of 3 , Feb 5, 2004
        • 0 Attachment
          It is tempting to answer this kind of question with something clever
          like, "If you're really advanced, you no longer try to measure your
          progress" or "Don't worry, just keep on practising, and you will
          eventually gain enlightenment."

          However, these answers are not intelligent unless they are coming from
          an enlightened master. It is stupid to practise with blind faith for
          years and years without ever questioning one's practice to see if it
          is working as it should. The right method is vital. It doesn't matter
          how hard you practice, if the method is wrong, you won't succeed.

          Ajahn Sucitto, the abbot of Chithurst Buddhist Monastery, is a very
          determined practitioner. When he went on pilgrimmage to the holy
          places in India, he travelled everwhere on foot, as the Buddha would
          have done. He once related a story of how he was trying to start a
          chainsaw. You know how tough it can be sometimes. He pulled and pulled
          on the start cord for ages. Eventually, he checked and found that the
          petrol valve was not open.

          The Visuddhimagga is very thorough. The chapter on wisdom described
          the progress of insight and various insight knowledges in some detail.
          The Venerable Mahasi Sayadaw's Progress of Insight is much shorter and
          perhaps easier to understand. If one is practising without the regular
          guidance of a teacher it is helpful to study that, though not if one
          is just beginning the practice. A beginner might be intimidated and
          feel quite hopeless of ever gaining the goal, which seems so remote.

          You can read it on my website:

          http://www.aimwell.org/Books/Library/Mahasi/Progress/progress.html

          On a more general level, one can gauge one's progress in other ways by
          asking a few basic questions. For example:

          1. How long do I sleep? Is it any less than I used to?
          2. How much time do I spend doing useless things like watching TV?
          3. How attached am I to my possessions and money? Do I give more in
          charity than I used to?
          4. How attached am I to my companions? Wife, children, friends. Am I
          able to keep myself happy when they are not around?
          5. How attached am I to my views? If I don't get my own way, can I
          adjust to doing things the way that others think is best?
          6. Do I delight in solitude? Is meditation a chore or a constant
          source of delight and rejuvination? Do I still look for excuses to
          avoid doing it?
        Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.