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  • wynn
    Dear Venerable Sirs, This is my first mail to the group since I joined long time ago. I am from Malaysia. As I was reading Gombrich s How Buddhism Began, I
    Message 1 of 2 , Dec 31, 2001
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      Dear Venerable Sirs,

      This is my first mail to the group since I joined long time ago. I
      am from Malaysia.

      As I was reading Gombrich's How Buddhism Began, I encounter this contradiction. But I am sure that Buddha's teachings are not really contradictory (blind faith?). So, maybe Venerable Sirs could clear my doubt.

      The Buddha talk about Right View (samma ditthi).

      However, in Sutta Nipata verse 787, 800, 882, the Buddha said or
      (more impersonally) the true sage, has no views.

      How do you explain this contradiction?

      Thanks,
      Wynn



      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Khammai Dhammasami
      ... Dear Wynn, Perhaps, I am the one who has to give an answer to your question, simply because Richard F. Gombrich, a professor of Sanskrit at Oxford
      Message 2 of 2 , Jan 6, 2002
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        In message <012701c1923a$b190cd60$1556bad2@user> SanghaOnline@yahoogroups.com writes:
        > Dear Venerable Sirs,
        >
        > This is my first mail to the group since I joined long time ago. I
        > am from Malaysia.
        > As I was reading Gombrich's How Buddhism Began, I encounter this contradiction. But I am sure that Buddha's teachings are not really contradictory (blind faith?). So, maybe Venerable Sirs could clear my doubt.
        > The Buddha talk about Right View (samma ditthi).
        > However, in Sutta Nipata verse 787, 800, 882, the Buddha said or
        > (more impersonally) the true sage, has no views.
        > How do you explain this contradiction?
        >
        > Thanks,
        > Wynn
        --------
        Dear Wynn,

        Perhaps, I am the one who has to give an answer to your question, simply
        because Richard F. Gombrich, a professor of Sanskrit at Oxford University is
        currently my supervisor.

        Without venturing to read his mind, let me give my own answer to your question.
        Having the right view necessarily means seeing things in within the framework
        of the four noble truths: things have cause to appear and also to disappear;
        things are by nature unsatisfactory if we intend to extract happiness from
        them (it is thus dukkha); no permanent entity such as self to endure that
        dukkha but dukkha itself is a process, which is impermanent; in brief, things
        operate accordding to their own natures, not as we wish them to be; their nature is the three characteristics of life (anicca, dukkha and anatta)

        This is the right view, and with this right view as our second nature, we are
        not going to form opinion on things and live through them as if they are the
        essence of our very being. (People who believe "I think therefore I am" is
        living through opinions, perhaps which is his or others. When you see water
        you do not need to think about it nor speculate about it. If you can taste
        sugar, no need to speculate about its taste. Just like that we will be able to
        live without having opinions as the centre of our thoughts and indeed of our
        life.

        It matters no more if people say the world started from a big bang or was
        created by a creator for both of the propositions are opinions. Our priority
        will be putting off the elements that keep disturbing our mind. So only then
        the end of dukkha becomes our urgent task for we are prepared to waste no more
        time on trivial debate of opinions. So not forming opinion and not having
        opinion. This is what it means "not having a view", which is in the sense of
        having opinion.

        With Metta,

        Ven. Dhammasami
        Oxford, UK
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