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Breaking a lay precept

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  • padma tserin <boom_cat@yahoo.com>
    Dear Venerables, I wonder what a lay person can do if he breaks one of the precepts, for example the third precept. If he has not formally taken the five
    Message 1 of 2 , Mar 2, 2003
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      Dear Venerables,

      I wonder what a lay person can do if he breaks one of the precepts, for example the third precept. If he has
      not 'formally' taken the five precepts but has studied Buddhism for some years, he understands that there are
      effects of kamma, but he just could not control himself and therefore committed the action. What should he
      do? Does he need to confess in person to a monk?

      What are your advices to people who have committed actions that are against the five lay precepts?

      With best regards
      Padma Tserin
    • Ashin Punnobhasa
      Dear Padma Tserin, I assume that you have been studying Buddha s teaching. So I will directly answer your question. What is unwholesome in an action is
      Message 2 of 2 , Mar 4, 2003
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        Dear Padma Tserin,

        I assume that you have been studying Buddhs's teaching. So I will directly answer to your question.

        What is unwholesome in an action is unwholesome volition. That volition will give the result. Volition is a mental state. When a person commit adultry, for example, the action is done with unwholesome volition. Even though that person comitted it before he or she take the five precepts, there was volition involved in the action.

        There are three types of action; mental, verbal, and physical. Wheather the action is mental, verbal or physical, there always volition which is a mental state involved. That volition is termed as karma (kamma).

        In the teaching of Buddha, regret (kukkucca)�also is a type of unwholesome mental state. So my suggestion to you is that if you have done something unwholesome, do not regret about it, but learn the lesson from it and determine not to do it again. Confession may be good only if that will be helpful to prevent the same type or similar types of unwholesome actions in the future. Otherwise I would not suggest�a confession. And also don't brood over the previous unwholesome actions, but be good now and in the future. �

        1. Try not to commit the same type of unwholesome actions in the future.

        2. Try not to commit another type of unwholesome actions in the future.

        3. Try to do the same type of wholesome actions that you have done in the past again and again.

        4. Try to do another type of wholesome actions that you have not yet done in the past.

        May you be happy,

        Ashin Punnobhasa

        P.S.

        I appologise to all of my Dhamma friends that I have been unable to perticipate in the discussions for such a long time.



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