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Significance of Sleep in Theravada Buddhism

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  • pothudaw@yahoo.com
    Dear Venerable Monks or Sayadaws, Sleep seems to be a black hole to us. We don t see what is happening there. Is the mind still active? Is any kamma
    Message 1 of 2 , Jul 1, 2001
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      Dear Venerable Monks or Sayadaws,

      'Sleep' seems to be a black hole to us. We don't see what is
      happening there. Is the mind still active? Is any kamma generated
      while in deep sleep or while dreaming? May I have your expert opinion
      about Sleep and Dreams from Theravadin point of view?

      With Regards,

      Po Thu Daw
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    • robertkirkpatrick@rocketmail.com
      Dear venerable monks, I have been looking for more scriptual expanations of the term khanika samadhi and the path of sukka vipassana. Venerable Gunaratana in
      Message 2 of 2 , Jul 2, 2001
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        Dear venerable monks,

        I have been looking for more scriptual expanations of the term
        khanika samadhi and the path of sukka vipassana.
        Venerable Gunaratana in his book on Jhanas provided some useful tests
        but I was wondering if you knew of more.

        Here is what he wrote:Venerable gunaratana (sri lanka ) writes:

        >>>>the Visuddhimagga clearly admits this possibility [of
        attaining nibbana by insight alone]when it distinguishes between
        the path arisen in a dry-insight mediator and the path arisen in
        one who possesses a jhana but does not use it as a basis for
        insight (Vism.666-67; PP.779). Textual evidence that there can
        be arahats lacking mundane jhana is provided by the Susima Sutta
        (S.ii, 199-23) together with is commentaries. When the monks in
        the sutta are asked how they can be arahats without possessing
        supernormal powers of the immaterial attainments, they reply:
        "We are liberated by wisdom" (pannavimutta kho mayam).

        The commentary glosses this reply thus: "We are contemplatives,
        dry-insight meditators, liberated by wisdom alone" (Mayam
        nijjhanaka sukkhavipassaka pannamatten'eva vimutta ti,
        SA.ii,117). The commentary also states that the Buddha gave his
        long disquisition on insight in the sutta "to show the arising
        of knowledge even without concentration" (vina pi samadhimevam
        nanuppattidassanattham, SA.ii,117). The subcommentary
        establishes the point by explaining "even without concentration"
        to mean "even without concentration previously accomplished
        reaching the mark of serenity" (samathalakkhanappattam
        purimasiddhamvina pi samadhin ti), adding that this is said in
        reference to one who makes insight his vehicle (ST.ii,125).
        >>>>endquote

        with respect

        robert
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