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Lewmar folding Wheel

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  • jay4868@yahoo.com
    Im considering a Lewmar folding wheel for my S38. Anyone out there using one? Will a Raymarine wheel pilot fit the wheel? Do I need the duel hub model to
    Message 1 of 19 , Mar 5, 2007
      Im considering a Lewmar folding wheel for my S38. Anyone out there using one? Will a Raymarine wheel pilot fit the wheel? Do I need the duel hub model to fit an Edson pedistal? How well do thoes hinges hold up over time.
      Any feedback will be most welcome

      Joe Murphy
      Ceapach S38M1



      ____________________________________________________________________________________
      Now that's room service! Choose from over 150,000 hotels
      in 45,000 destinations on Yahoo! Travel to find your fit.
      http://farechase.yahoo.com/promo-generic-14795097
    • workshoe99
      Joe, More power to you, but I can t overcome the cost of those new wheels. I can unscrew the plastic nut, take the wheel off and tie it to a stanchion midships
      Message 2 of 19 , Mar 5, 2007
        Joe,

        More power to you, but I can't overcome the cost of those new wheels.
        I can unscrew the plastic nut, take the wheel off and tie it to a
        stanchion midships for FREE!

        Jan S38 Mk I #41

        PS- What hull number are you anyways?


        --- In Sabresailboat@yahoogroups.com, jay4868@... wrote:
        >
        > Im considering a Lewmar folding wheel for my S38. Anyone out there
        using one? Will a Raymarine wheel pilot fit the wheel? Do I need the
        duel hub model to fit an Edson pedistal? How well do thoes hinges
        hold up over time.
        > Any feedback will be most welcome
        >
        > Joe Murphy
        > Ceapach S38M1
        >
        >
        >
        >
        ____________________________________________________________________________________
        > Now that's room service! Choose from over 150,000 hotels
        > in 45,000 destinations on Yahoo! Travel to find your fit.
        > http://farechase.yahoo.com/promo-generic-14795097
        >
      • david
        Well, five years since the last post to this thread, but I ll keep it going rather than start a new one...I m going to purchase a 36 Lewmar folding wheel for
        Message 3 of 19 , Jun 18, 2012
          Well, five years since the last post to this thread, but I'll keep it going rather than start a new one...I'm going to purchase a 36" Lewmar folding wheel for my 34 Targa. Has anyone else purchased one? The space between the wheel and the lazarette seems tight. I'm hoping there's enough room for it to fold over.  I'll let you know how it works out.  I also have to re-install the X5 autopilot as well.
          Dave B.
          Magic S34T#369
          Salem, MA
        • sailaway0608
          That is just what I do. After pulling in a cove or picking up a mooring, if I am going to relax on the boat for an overnighter or an afternoon, I just remove
          Message 4 of 19 , Jun 19, 2012
            That is just what I do. After pulling in a cove or picking up a mooring, if I am going to "relax" on the boat for an overnighter or an afternoon, I just remove the wheel and tie it to the lifelines. I leave the nut hand tight so I can remove and replace on a whim without any tools.

            Works great and gives us plenty of room in the cockpit.

            Rich Gottlieb
            1986 Sabre 36 CB
            Lake Champlain, VT
          • Jim
            I have a Edson Wheel Storage Device mounted on the rail. I carry an extra 24 wheel that I bought on Craigslist. Once anchored, I take off the 36 wheel and
            Message 5 of 19 , Jun 19, 2012
              I have a Edson Wheel Storage Device mounted on the rail. I carry an extra 24" wheel that I bought on Craigslist. Once anchored, I take off the 36" wheel and put on the 24". Gives you room in the cockpit, protects the autopilot, (Simrad WP30, sticks out the side) and you still have a wheel on if you need to do some quick moving.

              http://www.edsonmarine.com/ecatalogs/sail/00050.htm

              JD


              --- In Sabresailboat@yahoogroups.com, "sailaway0608" <richard@...> wrote:
              >
              >
              >
              > That is just what I do. After pulling in a cove or picking up a mooring, if I am going to "relax" on the boat for an overnighter or an afternoon, I just remove the wheel and tie it to the lifelines. I leave the nut hand tight so I can remove and replace on a whim without any tools.
              >
              > Works great and gives us plenty of room in the cockpit.
              >
              > Rich Gottlieb
              > 1986 Sabre 36 CB
              > Lake Champlain, VT
              >
            • Allison Lehman
              Funny story about removing the wheel. In the Deltas people regularly tie to a tree on land, which we find preferable and then throw out a stern anchor. So
              Message 6 of 19 , Jun 19, 2012
              Funny story about removing the wheel.  In the Deltas people regularly tie to a tree on land, which we find preferable and then throw out a stern anchor.   So much so that there are several lines that come from trees if you know where to look.  The "regulars" put them there for their friends.  One night,  we were tied along with several other friends both tied and anchored out in an area called Potato Slough, it was twilight and rapidly getting dark and there was a lot of breeze that night and a fairly crowded anchorage as it was 4th of July weekend.  We had already finished dinner and were drinking a little red wine when we noticed that the boat was swinging a fair amount so I checked the bow line which was taut and then the stern line.  This was the first year for the rode we had on the stern line so it was constantly stretching and needing to be snugged up.  i went back to my wine in the cockpit when I noticed and commented to my husband that the angle to our friends boat next to us was different than what we had seen all week.  Within seconds we realized our bow was loose so we sprang into action.  We started to fire up the engine and realized the wheel wasn't on!!!  We had set it in between the shrouds at the chainplates to get it out of the way!  With that much adrenaline pumping re-connecting the wheel was no small task.   We realized we didn't dare put the engine in gear as we had a stern anchor out with a modest amount of chain and plenty of rode and we were in shallow water.  As we began drifting swiftly down on other boats in the current and wind we called for a hand from our friends who had already hopped into their dinghies.  With the help of 3 dinghies, (remember it was windy) we didn't hit anybody and they got our bow back up to where it belonged.  In the dark one fellow went on to the island to re-tie us as we couldn't anchor that close and found our old line had been chewed through!  Not having the wheel attached after a couple of glasses of wine was a bit of a challenge to reconnect as we were moving slow.  

              In the 15 yrs our friends have been tying off to these trees they had never seen this happen, mind you they keep their boats tied off all summer long here.  Here is a pic of Calypso in full Delta mode.  Note the lanterns off the aft end of the sun shade for evening ambience!

              Sorry for the highjack,
              Allison

               




              On Jun 19, 2012, at 3:32 AM, sailaway0608 wrote:

               



              That is just what I do. After pulling in a cove or picking up a mooring, if I am going to "relax" on the boat for an overnighter or an afternoon, I just remove the wheel and tie it to the lifelines. I leave the nut hand tight so I can remove and replace on a whim without any tools.

              Works great and gives us plenty of room in the cockpit.

              Rich Gottlieb
              1986 Sabre 36 CB
              Lake Champlain, VT

            • Jan
              When anchored out, we always have the wheel off too. Since I have also heard of folks having an emergency come up and no wheel to deal with it, I have
              Message 7 of 19 , Jun 19, 2012
                When anchored out, we always have the wheel off too. Since I have also heard of folks having an "emergency" come up and no wheel to deal with it, I have thought a safer way of having the wheel off would be to clamp a Vicegrip on the shaft so you have some way of steering without fussing with the wheel. I believe a Vicegrip would work with red wine! I have never done this but it has entered my mine that maybe I should. Placement of the Vicegrip, if straight down, would give an indication of rudder position and still leave room around the pedestal.

                Jan

                --- In Sabresailboat@yahoogroups.com, Allison Lehman <allison@...> wrote:
                >
                > Funny story about removing the wheel. In the Deltas people regularly tie to a tree on land, which we find preferable and then throw out a stern anchor. So much so that there are several lines that come from trees if you know where to look. The "regulars" put them there for their friends. One night, we were tied along with several other friends both tied and anchored out in an area called Potato Slough, it was twilight and rapidly getting dark and there was a lot of breeze that night and a fairly crowded anchorage as it was 4th of July weekend. We had already finished dinner and were drinking a little red wine when we noticed that the boat was swinging a fair amount so I checked the bow line which was taut and then the stern line. This was the first year for the rode we had on the stern line so it was constantly stretching and needing to be snugged up. i went back to my wine in the cockpit when I noticed and commented to my husband that the angle to our friends boat next to us was different than what we had seen all week. Within seconds we realized our bow was loose so we sprang into action. We started to fire up the engine and realized the wheel wasn't on!!! We had set it in between the shrouds at the chainplates to get it out of the way! With that much adrenaline pumping re-connecting the wheel was no small task. We realized we didn't dare put the engine in gear as we had a stern anchor out with a modest amount of chain and plenty of rode and we were in shallow water. As we began drifting swiftly down on other boats in the current and wind we called for a hand from our friends who had already hopped into their dinghies. With the help of 3 dinghies, (remember it was windy) we didn't hit anybody and they got our bow back up to where it belonged. In the dark one fellow went on to the island to re-tie us as we couldn't anchor that close and found our old line had been chewed through! Not having the wheel attached after a couple of glasses of wine was a bit of a challenge to reconnect as we were moving slow.
                >
                > In the 15 yrs our friends have been tying off to these trees they had never seen this happen, mind you they keep their boats tied off all summer long here. Here is a pic of Calypso in full Delta mode. Note the lanterns off the aft end of the sun shade for evening ambience!
                >
                > Sorry for the highjack,
                > Allison
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                > On Jun 19, 2012, at 3:32 AM, sailaway0608 wrote:
                >
                > >
                > >
                > > That is just what I do. After pulling in a cove or picking up a mooring, if I am going to "relax" on the boat for an overnighter or an afternoon, I just remove the wheel and tie it to the lifelines. I leave the nut hand tight so I can remove and replace on a whim without any tools.
                > >
                > > Works great and gives us plenty of room in the cockpit.
                > >
                > > Rich Gottlieb
                > > 1986 Sabre 36 CB
                > > Lake Champlain, VT
                > >
                > >
                >
              • Dave Lochner
                Jan, It would seem that you would need to be very careful with the vise grips that you did not mar the shaft in such a way that it would be difficult to get
                Message 8 of 19 , Jun 19, 2012
                  Jan,

                  It would seem that you would need to be very careful with the vise grips that you did not mar the shaft in such a way that it would be difficult to get the wheel back on.

                  Dave


                  On Jun 19, 2012, at 11:14 AM, Jan wrote:

                   

                  When anchored out, we always have the wheel off too. Since I have also heard of folks having an "emergency" come up and no wheel to deal with it, I have thought a safer way of having the wheel off would be to clamp a Vicegrip on the shaft so you have some way of steering without fussing with the wheel. I believe a Vicegrip would work with red wine! I have never done this but it has entered my mine that maybe I should. Placement of the Vicegrip, if straight down, would give an indication of rudder position and still leave room around the pedestal.

                  Jan

                  --- In Sabresailboat@yahoogroups.com, Allison Lehman <allison@...> wrote:
                  >
                  > Funny story about removing the wheel. In the Deltas people regularly tie to a tree on land, which we find preferable and then throw out a stern anchor. So much so that there are several lines that come from trees if you know where to look. The "regulars" put them there for their friends. One night, we were tied along with several other friends both tied and anchored out in an area called Potato Slough, it was twilight and rapidly getting dark and there was a lot of breeze that night and a fairly crowded anchorage as it was 4th of July weekend. We had already finished dinner and were drinking a little red wine when we noticed that the boat was swinging a fair amount so I checked the bow line which was taut and then the stern line. This was the first year for the rode we had on the stern line so it was constantly stretching and needing to be snugged up. i went back to my wine in the cockpit when I noticed and commented to my husband that the angle to our friends boat next to us was different than what we had seen all week. Within seconds we realized our bow was loose so we sprang into action. We started to fire up the engine and realized the wheel wasn't on!!! We had set it in between the shrouds at the chainplates to get it out of the way! With that much adrenaline pumping re-connecting the wheel was no small task. We realized we didn't dare put the engine in gear as we had a stern anchor out with a modest amount of chain and plenty of rode and we were in shallow water. As we began drifting swiftly down on other boats in the current and wind we called for a hand from our friends who had already hopped into their dinghies. With the help of 3 dinghies, (remember it was windy) we didn't hit anybody and they got our bow back up to where it belonged. In the dark one fellow went on to the island to re-tie us as we couldn't anchor that close and found our old line had been chewed through! Not having the wheel attached after a couple of glasses of wine was a bit of a challenge to reconnect as we were moving slow.
                  >
                  > In the 15 yrs our friends have been tying off to these trees they had never seen this happen, mind you they keep their boats tied off all summer long here. Here is a pic of Calypso in full Delta mode. Note the lanterns off the aft end of the sun shade for evening ambience!
                  >
                  > Sorry for the highjack,
                  > Allison
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  > On Jun 19, 2012, at 3:32 AM, sailaway0608 wrote:
                  >
                  > >
                  > >
                  > > That is just what I do. After pulling in a cove or picking up a mooring, if I am going to "relax" on the boat for an overnighter or an afternoon, I just remove the wheel and tie it to the lifelines. I leave the nut hand tight so I can remove and replace on a whim without any tools.
                  > >
                  > > Works great and gives us plenty of room in the cockpit.
                  > >
                  > > Rich Gottlieb
                  > > 1986 Sabre 36 CB
                  > > Lake Champlain, VT
                  > >
                  > >
                  >


                • Jim Starkey
                  I do hope you are not planning to put a vice grips on a close tolerance machined surface. If the vice grips is (are?) tighten enough to turn the wheel in an
                  Message 9 of 19 , Jun 19, 2012
                    I do hope you are not planning to put a vice grips on a close tolerance machined surface.  If the vice grips is (are?) tighten enough to turn the wheel in an emergency, you will most likely score the shaft to the point that it will be difficult or impossible to put the wheel back on.


                    On 6/19/2012 11:14 AM, Jan wrote:
                     

                    When anchored out, we always have the wheel off too. Since I have also heard of folks having an "emergency" come up and no wheel to deal with it, I have thought a safer way of having the wheel off would be to clamp a Vicegrip on the shaft so you have some way of steering without fussing with the wheel. I believe a Vicegrip would work with red wine! I have never done this but it has entered my mine that maybe I should. Placement of the Vicegrip, if straight down, would give an indication of rudder position and still leave room around the pedestal.

                    Jan

                    --- In Sabresailboat@yahoogroups.com, Allison Lehman <allison@...> wrote:
                    >
                    > Funny story about removing the wheel. In the Deltas people regularly tie to a tree on land, which we find preferable and then throw out a stern anchor. So much so that there are several lines that come from trees if you know where to look. The "regulars" put them there for their friends. One night, we were tied along with several other friends both tied and anchored out in an area called Potato Slough, it was twilight and rapidly getting dark and there was a lot of breeze that night and a fairly crowded anchorage as it was 4th of July weekend. We had already finished dinner and were drinking a little red wine when we noticed that the boat was swinging a fair amount so I checked the bow line which was taut and then the stern line. This was the first year for the rode we had on the stern line so it was constantly stretching and needing to be snugged up. i went back to my wine in the cockpit when I noticed and commented to my husband that the angle to our friends boat next to us was different than what we had seen all week. Within seconds we realized our bow was loose so we sprang into action. We started to fire up the engine and realized the wheel wasn't on!!! We had set it in between the shrouds at the chainplates to get it out of the way! With that much adrenaline pumping re-connecting the wheel was no small task. We realized we didn't dare put the engine in gear as we had a stern anchor out with a modest amount of chain and plenty of rode and we were in shallow water. As we began drifting swiftly down on other boats in the current and wind we called for a hand from our friends who had already hopped into their dinghies. With the help of 3 dinghies, (remember it was windy) we didn't hit anybody and they got our bow back up to where it belonged. In the dark one fellow went on to the island to re-tie us as we couldn't anchor that close and found our old line had been chewed through! Not having the wheel attached after a couple of glasses of wine was a bit of a challenge to reconnect as we were moving slow.
                    >
                    > In the 15 yrs our friends have been tying off to these trees they had never seen this happen, mind you they keep their boats tied off all summer long here. Here is a pic of Calypso in full Delta mode. Note the lanterns off the aft end of the sun shade for evening ambience!
                    >
                    > Sorry for the highjack,
                    > Allison
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    > On Jun 19, 2012, at 3:32 AM, sailaway0608 wrote:
                    >
                    > >
                    > >
                    > > That is just what I do. After pulling in a cove or picking up a mooring, if I am going to "relax" on the boat for an overnighter or an afternoon, I just remove the wheel and tie it to the lifelines. I leave the nut hand tight so I can remove and replace on a whim without any tools.
                    > >
                    > > Works great and gives us plenty of room in the cockpit.
                    > >
                    > > Rich Gottlieb
                    > > 1986 Sabre 36 CB
                    > > Lake Champlain, VT
                    > >
                    > >
                    >



                    -- 
                    Jim Starkey
                    Founder and CTO
                    NuoDB, Inc.
                  • Richard Peirce
                    There s an opportunity here. Design a quick release bar that would attach in place of a wheel. Nice polished stainless. Maybe it comes with a tail mount for
                    Message 10 of 19 , Jun 19, 2012
                      There's an opportunity here. Design a quick release 'bar' that would attach in place of a wheel. Nice polished stainless.  Maybe it comes with a tail mount for the big wheel!?

                      r

                      From the iPhone of:

                      Richard Peirce
                      CHOPPER PICTURES INC. 

                      Mobile: +1(416)822-3330
                      Studio: +1(416)466-7333

                      On Jun 19, 2012, at 11:22 AM, Jim Starkey <jstarkey@...> wrote:

                       

                      I do hope you are not planning to put a vice grips on a close tolerance machined surface.  If the vice grips is (are?) tighten enough to turn the wheel in an emergency, you will most likely score the shaft to the point that it will be difficult or impossible to put the wheel back on.


                      On 6/19/2012 11:14 AM, Jan wrote:

                       

                      When anchored out, we always have the wheel off too. Since I have also heard of folks having an "emergency" come up and no wheel to deal with it, I have thought a safer way of having the wheel off would be to clamp a Vicegrip on the shaft so you have some way of steering without fussing with the wheel. I believe a Vicegrip would work with red wine! I have never done this but it has entered my mine that maybe I should. Placement of the Vicegrip, if straight down, would give an indication of rudder position and still leave room around the pedestal.

                      Jan

                      --- In Sabresailboat@yahoogroups.com, Allison Lehman <allison@...> wrote:
                      >
                      > Funny story about removing the wheel. In the Deltas people regularly tie to a tree on land, which we find preferable and then throw out a stern anchor. So much so that there are several lines that come from trees if you know where to look. The "regulars" put them there for their friends. One night, we were tied along with several other friends both tied and anchored out in an area called Potato Slough, it was twilight and rapidly getting dark and there was a lot of breeze that night and a fairly crowded anchorage as it was 4th of July weekend. We had already finished dinner and were drinking a little red wine when we noticed that the boat was swinging a fair amount so I checked the bow line which was taut and then the stern line. This was the first year for the rode we had on the stern line so it was constantly stretching and needing to be snugged up. i went back to my wine in the cockpit when I noticed and commented to my husband that the angle to our friends boat next to us was different than what we had seen all week. Within seconds we realized our bow was loose so we sprang into action. We started to fire up the engine and realized the wheel wasn't on!!! We had set it in between the shrouds at the chainplates to get it out of the way! With that much adrenaline pumping re-connecting the wheel was no small task. We realized we didn't dare put the engine in gear as we had a stern anchor out with a modest amount of chain and plenty of rode and we were in shallow water. As we began drifting swiftly down on other boats in the current and wind we called for a hand from our friends who had already hopped into their dinghies. With the help of 3 dinghies, (remember it was windy) we didn't hit anybody and they got our bow back up to where it belonged. In the dark one fellow went on to the island to re-tie us as we couldn't anchor that close and found our old line had been chewed through! Not having the wheel attached after a couple of glasses of wine was a bit of a challenge to reconnect as we were moving slow.
                      >
                      > In the 15 yrs our friends have been tying off to these trees they had never seen this happen, mind you they keep their boats tied off all summer long here. Here is a pic of Calypso in full Delta mode. Note the lanterns off the aft end of the sun shade for evening ambience!
                      >
                      > Sorry for the highjack,
                      > Allison
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      > On Jun 19, 2012, at 3:32 AM, sailaway0608 wrote:
                      >
                      > >
                      > >
                      > > That is just what I do. After pulling in a cove or picking up a mooring, if I am going to "relax" on the boat for an overnighter or an afternoon, I just remove the wheel and tie it to the lifelines. I leave the nut hand tight so I can remove and replace on a whim without any tools.
                      > >
                      > > Works great and gives us plenty of room in the cockpit.
                      > >
                      > > Rich Gottlieb
                      > > 1986 Sabre 36 CB
                      > > Lake Champlain, VT
                      > >
                      > >
                      >



                      -- 
                      Jim Starkey
                      Founder and CTO
                      NuoDB, Inc.

                    • david
                      or just get a folding wheel ;)
                      Message 11 of 19 , Jun 19, 2012
                        or just get a folding wheel ;)

                        --- In Sabresailboat@yahoogroups.com, Jim Starkey <jstarkey@...> wrote:
                        >
                        > I do hope you are not planning to put a vice grips on a close tolerance
                        > machined surface. If the vice grips is (are?) tighten enough to turn
                        > the wheel in an emergency, you will most likely score the shaft to the
                        > point that it will be difficult or impossible to put the wheel back on.
                      • sailaway0608
                        Why not re-install the wheel before turning in for the night. That way, if something comes up overnight, you won t need to be fumbling around in the dark for
                        Message 12 of 19 , Jun 19, 2012
                          Why not re-install the wheel before turning in for the night. That way, if something comes up overnight, you won't need to be fumbling around in the dark for the wheel. it's already back on.


                          Rich
                          1986 Sabre 36 CB
                          Lake Champlain, VT


                          --- In Sabresailboat@yahoogroups.com, "david" <dbousquet@...> wrote:
                          >
                          > or just get a folding wheel ;)
                          >
                          > --- In Sabresailboat@yahoogroups.com, Jim Starkey <jstarkey@> wrote:
                          > >
                          > > I do hope you are not planning to put a vice grips on a close tolerance
                          > > machined surface. If the vice grips is (are?) tighten enough to turn
                          > > the wheel in an emergency, you will most likely score the shaft to the
                          > > point that it will be difficult or impossible to put the wheel back on.
                          >
                        • Home
                          I can t take credit for this (thank you Howard Brooks!), but our solution is an 18 party wheel that we put on when there is a crowd in the cockpit. Plenty
                          Message 13 of 19 , Jun 19, 2012
                            I can't take credit for this (thank you Howard Brooks!), but our solution is an 18" "party wheel" that we put on when there is a crowd in the cockpit.  Plenty of room, and you can still drive if you need to.

                            Rick
                            Calypso



                            On Jun 19, 2012, at 1:03 PM, Richard Peirce <richard@...> wrote:

                             

                            There's an opportunity here. Design a quick release 'bar' that would attach in place of a wheel. Nice polished stainless.  Maybe it comes with a tail mount for the big wheel!?

                            r

                            From the iPhone of:

                            Richard Peirce
                            CHOPPER PICTURES INC. 

                            Mobile: +1(416)822-3330
                            Studio: +1(416)466-7333

                            On Jun 19, 2012, at 11:22 AM, Jim Starkey <jstarkey@...> wrote:

                             

                            I do hope you are not planning to put a vice grips on a close tolerance machined surface.  If the vice grips is (are?) tighten enough to turn the wheel in an emergency, you will most likely score the shaft to the point that it will be difficult or impossible to put the wheel back on.


                            On 6/19/2012 11:14 AM, Jan wrote:

                             

                            When anchored out, we always have the wheel off too. Since I have also heard of folks having an "emergency" come up and no wheel to deal with it, I have thought a safer way of having the wheel off would be to clamp a Vicegrip on the shaft so you have some way of steering without fussing with the wheel. I believe a Vicegrip would work with red wine! I have never done this but it has entered my mine that maybe I should. Placement of the Vicegrip, if straight down, would give an indication of rudder position and still leave room around the pedestal.

                            Jan

                            --- In Sabresailboat@yahoogroups.com, Allison Lehman <allison@...> wrote:
                            >
                            > Funny story about removing the wheel. In the Deltas people regularly tie to a tree on land, which we find preferable and then throw out a stern anchor. So much so that there are several lines that come from trees if you know where to look. The "regulars" put them there for their friends. One night, we were tied along with several other friends both tied and anchored out in an area called Potato Slough, it was twilight and rapidly getting dark and there was a lot of breeze that night and a fairly crowded anchorage as it was 4th of July weekend. We had already finished dinner and were drinking a little red wine when we noticed that the boat was swinging a fair amount so I checked the bow line which was taut and then the stern line. This was the first year for the rode we had on the stern line so it was constantly stretching and needing to be snugged up. i went back to my wine in the cockpit when I noticed and commented to my husband that the angle to our friends boat next to us was different than what we had seen all week. Within seconds we realized our bow was loose so we sprang into action. We started to fire up the engine and realized the wheel wasn't on!!! We had set it in between the shrouds at the chainplates to get it out of the way! With that much adrenaline pumping re-connecting the wheel was no small task. We realized we didn't dare put the engine in gear as we had a stern anchor out with a modest amount of chain and plenty of rode and we were in shallow water. As we began drifting swiftly down on other boats in the current and wind we called for a hand from our friends who had already hopped into their dinghies. With the help of 3 dinghies, (remember it was windy) we didn't hit anybody and they got our bow back up to where it belonged. In the dark one fellow went on to the island to re-tie us as we couldn't anchor that close and found our old line had been chewed through! Not having the wheel attached after a couple of glasses of wine was a bit of a challenge to reconnect as we were moving slow.
                            >
                            > In the 15 yrs our friends have been tying off to these trees they had never seen this happen, mind you they keep their boats tied off all summer long here. Here is a pic of Calypso in full Delta mode. Note the lanterns off the aft end of the sun shade for evening ambience!
                            >
                            > Sorry for the highjack,
                            > Allison
                            >
                            >
                            >
                            >
                            >
                            >
                            > On Jun 19, 2012, at 3:32 AM, sailaway0608 wrote:
                            >
                            > >
                            > >
                            > > That is just what I do. After pulling in a cove or picking up a mooring, if I am going to "relax" on the boat for an overnighter or an afternoon, I just remove the wheel and tie it to the lifelines. I leave the nut hand tight so I can remove and replace on a whim without any tools.
                            > >
                            > > Works great and gives us plenty of room in the cockpit.
                            > >
                            > > Rich Gottlieb
                            > > 1986 Sabre 36 CB
                            > > Lake Champlain, VT
                            > >
                            > >
                            >



                            -- 
                            Jim Starkey
                            Founder and CTO
                            NuoDB, Inc.

                          • Chas
                            We bought a 32 lewmar folding wheel for our 34 MkI 3 years ago and have been very happy with it. We wouldn t have bought it but Defender was closing them out
                            Message 14 of 19 , Jun 19, 2012
                              We bought a 32" lewmar folding wheel for our 34 MkI 3 years ago and have been very happy with it. We wouldn't have bought it but Defender was closing them out for $375. We had to settle for navy blue leather with "Catalina" stripes. Charlie Pajama Girl 1979 S34 MkI #62

                              --- In Sabresailboat@yahoogroups.com, "david" <dbousquet@...> wrote:
                              >
                              > Well, five years since the last post to this thread, but I'll keep it
                              > going rather than start a new one...I'm going to purchase a 36" Lewmar
                              > folding wheel for my 34 Targa. Has anyone else purchased one? The space
                              > between the wheel and the lazarette seems tight. I'm hoping there's
                              > enough room for it to fold over. I'll let you know how it works out. I
                              > also have to re-install the X5 autopilot as well.
                              > Dave B.
                              > Magic S34T#369
                              > Salem, MA
                              >
                            • Jan
                              What s a little work with a bastard file which I keep on board verses dragging into rocks, beach, another boat? Of course, placing a Vicegrip on a machined
                              Message 15 of 19 , Jun 20, 2012
                                What's a little work with a bastard file which I keep on board verses dragging into rocks, beach, another boat? Of course, placing a Vicegrip on a machined surface must be done with care.

                                Jan

                                --- In Sabresailboat@yahoogroups.com, Jim Starkey <jstarkey@...> wrote:
                                >
                                > I do hope you are not planning to put a vice grips on a close tolerance
                                > machined surface. If the vice grips is (are?) tighten enough to turn
                                > the wheel in an emergency, you will most likely score the shaft to the
                                > point that it will be difficult or impossible to put the wheel back on.
                                >
                                >
                                > On 6/19/2012 11:14 AM, Jan wrote:
                                > >
                                > > When anchored out, we always have the wheel off too. Since I have also
                                > > heard of folks having an "emergency" come up and no wheel to deal with
                                > > it, I have thought a safer way of having the wheel off would be to
                                > > clamp a Vicegrip on the shaft so you have some way of steering without
                                > > fussing with the wheel. I believe a Vicegrip would work with red wine!
                                > > I have never done this but it has entered my mine that maybe I should.
                                > > Placement of the Vicegrip, if straight down, would give an indication
                                > > of rudder position and still leave room around the pedestal.
                                > >
                                > > Jan
                                > >
                                > > --- In Sabresailboat@yahoogroups.com
                                > > <mailto:Sabresailboat%40yahoogroups.com>, Allison Lehman <allison@>
                                > > wrote:
                                > > >
                                > > > Funny story about removing the wheel. In the Deltas people regularly
                                > > tie to a tree on land, which we find preferable and then throw out a
                                > > stern anchor. So much so that there are several lines that come from
                                > > trees if you know where to look. The "regulars" put them there for
                                > > their friends. One night, we were tied along with several other
                                > > friends both tied and anchored out in an area called Potato Slough, it
                                > > was twilight and rapidly getting dark and there was a lot of breeze
                                > > that night and a fairly crowded anchorage as it was 4th of July
                                > > weekend. We had already finished dinner and were drinking a little red
                                > > wine when we noticed that the boat was swinging a fair amount so I
                                > > checked the bow line which was taut and then the stern line. This was
                                > > the first year for the rode we had on the stern line so it was
                                > > constantly stretching and needing to be snugged up. i went back to my
                                > > wine in the cockpit when I noticed and commented to my husband that
                                > > the angle to our friends boat next to us was different than what we
                                > > had seen all week. Within seconds we realized our bow was loose so we
                                > > sprang into action. We started to fire up the engine and realized the
                                > > wheel wasn't on!!! We had set it in between the shrouds at the
                                > > chainplates to get it out of the way! With that much adrenaline
                                > > pumping re-connecting the wheel was no small task. We realized we
                                > > didn't dare put the engine in gear as we had a stern anchor out with a
                                > > modest amount of chain and plenty of rode and we were in shallow
                                > > water. As we began drifting swiftly down on other boats in the current
                                > > and wind we called for a hand from our friends who had already hopped
                                > > into their dinghies. With the help of 3 dinghies, (remember it was
                                > > windy) we didn't hit anybody and they got our bow back up to where it
                                > > belonged. In the dark one fellow went on to the island to re-tie us as
                                > > we couldn't anchor that close and found our old line had been chewed
                                > > through! Not having the wheel attached after a couple of glasses of
                                > > wine was a bit of a challenge to reconnect as we were moving slow.
                                > > >
                                > > > In the 15 yrs our friends have been tying off to these trees they
                                > > had never seen this happen, mind you they keep their boats tied off
                                > > all summer long here. Here is a pic of Calypso in full Delta mode.
                                > > Note the lanterns off the aft end of the sun shade for evening ambience!
                                > > >
                                > > > Sorry for the highjack,
                                > > > Allison
                                > > >
                                > > >
                                > > >
                                > > >
                                > > >
                                > > >
                                > > > On Jun 19, 2012, at 3:32 AM, sailaway0608 wrote:
                                > > >
                                > > > >
                                > > > >
                                > > > > That is just what I do. After pulling in a cove or picking up a
                                > > mooring, if I am going to "relax" on the boat for an overnighter or an
                                > > afternoon, I just remove the wheel and tie it to the lifelines. I
                                > > leave the nut hand tight so I can remove and replace on a whim without
                                > > any tools.
                                > > > >
                                > > > > Works great and gives us plenty of room in the cockpit.
                                > > > >
                                > > > > Rich Gottlieb
                                > > > > 1986 Sabre 36 CB
                                > > > > Lake Champlain, VT
                                > > > >
                                > > > >
                                > > >
                                > >
                                > >
                                >
                                >
                                > --
                                > Jim Starkey
                                > Founder and CTO
                                > NuoDB, Inc.
                                >
                              • walkabout193
                                For Walkabout I purchased the insanely overpriced Edson fitting for storing the wheel on the rail. After settling in I remove the wheel from the helm for an
                                Message 16 of 19 , Jun 21, 2012
                                  For Walkabout I purchased the insanely overpriced Edson fitting for storing the wheel on the rail. After settling in I remove the wheel from the helm for an open spacious cockpit.

                                  Len Bertaux
                                  Walkabout S38 mkii

                                  --- In Sabresailboat@yahoogroups.com, jay4868@... wrote:
                                  >
                                  > Im considering a Lewmar folding wheel for my S38. Anyone out there using one? Will a Raymarine wheel pilot fit the wheel? Do I need the duel hub model to fit an Edson pedistal? How well do thoes hinges hold up over time.
                                  > Any feedback will be most welcome
                                  >
                                  > Joe Murphy
                                  > Ceapach S38M1
                                  >
                                  >
                                  >
                                  > ____________________________________________________________________________________
                                  > Now that's room service! Choose from over 150,000 hotels
                                  > in 45,000 destinations on Yahoo! Travel to find your fit.
                                  > http://farechase.yahoo.com/promo-generic-14795097
                                  >
                                • david
                                  Does Anyone have a spare set of 16mm spoke adapters for a raymarine autopilot? The edson wheel uses the 12mm set and I believe the lewmar wheel with its larger
                                  Message 17 of 19 , Jun 21, 2012
                                    Does Anyone have a spare set of 16mm spoke adapters for a raymarine autopilot? The edson wheel uses the 12mm set and I believe the lewmar wheel with its larger spokes will use the 16mm. I had the yard install my x5 a few years ago and they threw the 16mm set out. The kit comes with both so if anyone has a set of 16mm I'd be willing for pay for them. Raymarine has them but it's part of a $25 kit and I would need to purchase 3 of them. Thank you!
                                    Dave B.

                                    --- In Sabresailboat@yahoogroups.com, "david" <dbousquet@...> wrote:
                                    >
                                    > Well, five years since the last post to this thread, but I'll keep it
                                    > going rather than start a new one...I'm going to purchase a 36" Lewmar
                                    > folding wheel for my 34 Targa. Has anyone else purchased one? The space
                                    > between the wheel and the lazarette seems tight. I'm hoping there's
                                    > enough room for it to fold over. I'll let you know how it works out. I
                                    > also have to re-install the X5 autopilot as well.
                                    > Dave B.
                                    > Magic S34T#369
                                    > Salem, MA
                                    >
                                  • Dave Lochner
                                    Dave, Let me check when I get home, they were just sitting on a shelf in the garage last I saw them. Dave
                                    Message 18 of 19 , Jun 21, 2012
                                      Dave,

                                      Let me check when I get home, they were just sitting on a shelf in the garage last I saw them.

                                      Dave


                                      On Jun 21, 2012, at 10:20 AM, david wrote:

                                       

                                      Does Anyone have a spare set of 16mm spoke adapters for a raymarine autopilot? The edson wheel uses the 12mm set and I believe the lewmar wheel with its larger spokes will use the 16mm. I had the yard install my x5 a few years ago and they threw the 16mm set out. The kit comes with both so if anyone has a set of 16mm I'd be willing for pay for them. Raymarine has them but it's part of a $25 kit and I would need to purchase 3 of them. Thank you!
                                      Dave B.

                                      --- In Sabresailboat@yahoogroups.com, "david" <dbousquet@...> wrote:
                                      >
                                      > Well, five years since the last post to this thread, but I'll keep it
                                      > going rather than start a new one...I'm going to purchase a 36" Lewmar
                                      > folding wheel for my 34 Targa. Has anyone else purchased one? The space
                                      > between the wheel and the lazarette seems tight. I'm hoping there's
                                      > enough room for it to fold over. I'll let you know how it works out. I
                                      > also have to re-install the X5 autopilot as well.
                                      > Dave B.
                                      > Magic S34T#369
                                      > Salem, MA
                                      >


                                    • david
                                      I ended up purchasing the 36 Lewmar wheel from Defender. Installation of the wheel itself was straightforward. When folded, the wheel makes it much easier
                                      Message 19 of 19 , Jul 2, 2012
                                        I ended up purchasing the 36" Lewmar wheel from Defender. Installation of the wheel itself was straightforward. When folded, the wheel makes it much easier to move around the cockpit when at anchor. I installed the adapter for Edson pedestals and noted there was a very small amount of play but something I could live with. Installation of the Raymarine x-5 was a little tricky in that I did not have the 16mm spoke adapters which would have made the install more straight forward. You can purchase the 16mm adapters from Raymarine, but each adapter is part of a $25 kit that includes one adapter, one plastic spoke cover and screws, resulting in a final cost of $75 for 3 pieces of rubber. Raymarine does not sell them individually. As a result, I trimmed my existing adapters. The drive itself, must be turned so that the spoke adapter that is normally at the 12 o'clock position is either at 11 or 1 o'clock. I found this did not impact performance at all. The unit is functioning normally. So I'm in business with my new wheel and thought I'd share some observations I didn't see elsewhere on the net.



                                        --- In Sabresailboat@yahoogroups.com, "david" <dbousquet@...> wrote:
                                        >
                                        > Well, five years since the last post to this thread, but I'll keep it
                                        > going rather than start a new one...I'm going to purchase a 36" Lewmar
                                        > folding wheel for my 34 Targa. Has anyone else purchased one? The space
                                        > between the wheel and the lazarette seems tight. I'm hoping there's
                                        > enough room for it to fold over. I'll let you know how it works out. I
                                        > also have to re-install the X5 autopilot as well.
                                        > Dave B.
                                        > Magic S34T#369
                                        > Salem, MA
                                        >
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