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Re: [SabreSailboat] Re: Pull For Ernesto Opinion

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  • john kalinowski
    Besides a line around the mainsail (better to remove the mainsail), one should always have a preventer on their furling headsail. It is nothing more than a
    Message 1 of 22 , Sep 1, 2006
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      Besides a line around the mainsail (better to remove the mainsail), one should always have a preventer on their furling headsail. It is nothing more than a sail tie looped twice around with a secure knot. Bonus points for going through  the clue.   That way even if the furling line let go, the sail cannot unroll.
       
      I have seen a new $6,000 sail shreded because this was not done.
      Worst part is most insurance policies do not cover sails, so this piece of line or webbing is your insurance...  It is done automatically as soon as the mooring pendents are in their cleats on my boat.
       
      john

      gmuller22 <gmuller22@...> wrote:
      Grant, they are predicting 20-25 kts steady SE winds with gusts to
      35 kts. in your area. This is no worse than any typical coastal
      storm and will pass fairly quickly. If you're concerned about your
      boat I suggest you make sure your hatches are closed tightly, lines
      are properly secured (put on a few more if you can, it can't hurt)
      and that your fully fendered. Put a few more turns on your furled
      sail and wrap a rope around your entire mainsail cover and that
      should just about do it. If you're on a mooring you might want to
      make sure your mooring lines are sufficiently chafe guarded.

      --- In Sabresailboat@ yahoogroups. com, Grant Woodside
      <gewoodsiii@ ...> wrote:
      >
      > Do you have an opinion about pulling for Ernesto in the Annapolis
      area?
      >
      > Grant
      >



      Yahoo! Messenger with Voice. Make PC-to-Phone Calls to the US (and 30+ countries) for 2¢/min or less.

    • David Felsenthal
      In addition, if you expect seas, tie the wheel or tiller firmly, don t rely on the brake. Also tie the boom from the end to both port and starboard siddes, so
      Message 2 of 22 , Sep 1, 2006
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        In addition, if you expect seas, tie the wheel or tiller firmly, don't
        rely on the brake.

        Also tie the boom from the end to both port and starboard siddes, so it
        won't slop back and forth.

        I strongly second John's suggestion to tie the roller furling headsail.

        The most common problem's I've seen in storms are:

        Shredded roller furling headsail
        Broken steering gear due to swinging and rolling on a mooring
        Broken travelers from booms swinging
        Boats with mooring pennants chafed through
        Mainsails climbing the mast because they lacked a sail tie through the
        headboard and the cover came off
        And of course smaller motor boats flipped or swamped by big seas

        Can anyone add to or correct this list? It is my recollection from
        watching boats on moorings.

        David

        john kalinowski wrote:
        >
        >
        > Besides a line around the mainsail (better to remove the mainsail), one
        > should always have a preventer on their furling headsail. It is nothing
        > more than a sail tie looped twice around with a secure knot. Bonus
        > points for going through the clue. That way even if the furling line
        > let go, the sail cannot unroll.
        >
        > I have seen a new $6,000 sail shreded because this was not done.
        > Worst part is most insurance policies do not cover sails, so this piece
        > of line or webbing is your insurance... It is done automatically as
        > soon as the mooring pendents are in their cleats on my boat.
        >
        > john
        >
        > */gmuller22 <gmuller22@...>/* wrote:
        >
        > Grant, they are predicting 20-25 kts steady SE winds with gusts to
        > 35 kts. in your area. This is no worse than any typical coastal
        > storm and will pass fairly quickly. If you're concerned about your
        > boat I suggest you make sure your hatches are closed tightly, lines
        > are properly secured (put on a few more if you can, it can't hurt)
        > and that your fully fendered. Put a few more turns on your furled
        > sail and wrap a rope around your entire mainsail cover and that
        > should just about do it. If you're on a mooring you might want to
        > make sure your mooring lines are sufficiently chafe guarded.
        >
        > --- In Sabresailboat@yahoogroups.com
        > <mailto:Sabresailboat%40yahoogroups.com>, Grant Woodside
        > <gewoodsiii@...> wrote:
        > >
        > > Do you have an opinion about pulling for Ernesto in the Annapolis
        > area?
        > >
        > > Grant
        > >
        >
        >
        > ------------------------------------------------------------------------
        > Yahoo! Messenger with Voice. Make PC-to-Phone Calls
        > <http://us.rd.yahoo.com/mail_us/taglines/postman1/*http://us.rd.yahoo.com/evt=39663/*http://voice.yahoo.com>
        > to the US (and 30+ countries) for 2¢/min or less.
        >
        >



        --
        David
        Atlantea, Sabre 38 MKII
      • Grant Woodside
        Eliza D is in a slip. Wish I had these suggestions before I went to the boat last evening. These are obvious suggestions, but I didn t think of them. o tie the
        Message 3 of 22 , Sep 1, 2006
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          Eliza D is in a slip. Wish I had these suggestions before I went to the
          boat last evening. These are obvious suggestions, but I didn't think of
          them.

          o tie the wheel or tiller firmly, don't rely on the brake.
          o tie the boom from the end to both port and starboard sides
          o wrap a rope around your entire mainsail cover
          o have a preventer on their furling headsail

          I did

          o remove the cowls and replace with caps
          o pull the boat forward in the slip so the narrower stern instead of
          the beam is at the poles
          o add a second set of bow lines

          Grant


          --- David Felsenthal <atlantea@...> wrote:

          > In addition, if you expect seas, tie the wheel or tiller firmly,
          > don't
          > rely on the brake.
          >
          > Also tie the boom from the end to both port and starboard siddes, so
          > it
          > won't slop back and forth.
          >
          > I strongly second John's suggestion to tie the roller furling
          > headsail.
          >
          > The most common problem's I've seen in storms are:
          >
          > Shredded roller furling headsail
          > Broken steering gear due to swinging and rolling on a mooring
          > Broken travelers from booms swinging
          > Boats with mooring pennants chafed through
          > Mainsails climbing the mast because they lacked a sail tie through
          > the
          > headboard and the cover came off
          > And of course smaller motor boats flipped or swamped by big seas
          >
          > Can anyone add to or correct this list? It is my recollection from
          > watching boats on moorings.
          >
          > David
          >
          > john kalinowski wrote:
          > >
          > >
          > > Besides a line around the mainsail (better to remove the mainsail),
          > one
          > > should always have a preventer on their furling headsail. It is
          > nothing
          > > more than a sail tie looped twice around with a secure knot. Bonus
          > > points for going through the clue. That way even if the furling
          > line
          > > let go, the sail cannot unroll.
          > >
          > > I have seen a new $6,000 sail shreded because this was not done.
          > > Worst part is most insurance policies do not cover sails, so this
          > piece
          > > of line or webbing is your insurance... It is done automatically
          > as
          > > soon as the mooring pendents are in their cleats on my boat.
          > >
          > > john
          > >
          > > */gmuller22 <gmuller22@...>/* wrote:
          > >
          > > Grant, they are predicting 20-25 kts steady SE winds with gusts
          > to
          > > 35 kts. in your area. This is no worse than any typical coastal
          > > storm and will pass fairly quickly. If you're concerned about
          > your
          > > boat I suggest you make sure your hatches are closed tightly,
          > lines
          > > are properly secured (put on a few more if you can, it can't
          > hurt)
          > > and that your fully fendered. Put a few more turns on your
          > furled
          > > sail and wrap a rope around your entire mainsail cover and that
          > > should just about do it. If you're on a mooring you might want
          > to
          > > make sure your mooring lines are sufficiently chafe guarded.
          > >
          > > --- In Sabresailboat@yahoogroups.com
          > > <mailto:Sabresailboat%40yahoogroups.com>, Grant Woodside
          > > <gewoodsiii@...> wrote:
          > > >
          > > > Do you have an opinion about pulling for Ernesto in the
          > Annapolis
          > > area?
          > > >
          > > > Grant
          > > >
          > >
          > >
          > >
          >
          ------------------------------------------------------------------------
          > > Yahoo! Messenger with Voice. Make PC-to-Phone Calls
          > >
          >
          <http://us.rd.yahoo.com/mail_us/taglines/postman1/*http://us.rd.yahoo.com/evt=39663/*http://voice.yahoo.com>
          >
          > > to the US (and 30+ countries) for 2¢/min or less.
          > >
          > >
          >
          >
          >
          > --
          > David
          > Atlantea, Sabre 38 MKII
          >
          >
          >
        • David Evans
          Most important I d say is your number 4, chafing gear! Sails still cheaper than boat! But good points by all about furled sail preventers, both on the genoa
          Message 4 of 22 , Sep 1, 2006
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            Most important I'd say is your number 4, chafing gear! Sails still cheaper
            than boat!

            But good points by all about furled sail "preventers," both on the genoa
            and the mainsail. The latter I've never seen but a fine idea.

            The steering gear issue is new to me also. Really?

            dge

            > In addition, if you expect seas, tie the wheel or tiller firmly, don't
            > rely on the brake.
            >
            > Also tie the boom from the end to both port and starboard siddes, so it
            > won't slop back and forth.
            >
            > I strongly second John's suggestion to tie the roller furling headsail.
            >
            > The most common problem's I've seen in storms are:
            >
            > Shredded roller furling headsail
            > Broken steering gear due to swinging and rolling on a mooring
            > Broken travelers from booms swinging
            > Boats with mooring pennants chafed through
            > Mainsails climbing the mast because they lacked a sail tie through the
            > headboard and the cover came off
            > And of course smaller motor boats flipped or swamped by big seas
            >
            > Can anyone add to or correct this list? It is my recollection from
            > watching boats on moorings.
            >
            > David
            >
            > john kalinowski wrote:
            >>
            >>
            >> Besides a line around the mainsail (better to remove the mainsail), one
            >> should always have a preventer on their furling headsail. It is nothing
            >> more than a sail tie looped twice around with a secure knot. Bonus
            >> points for going through the clue. That way even if the furling line
            >> let go, the sail cannot unroll.
            >>
            >> I have seen a new $6,000 sail shreded because this was not done.
            >> Worst part is most insurance policies do not cover sails, so this piece
            >> of line or webbing is your insurance... It is done automatically as
            >> soon as the mooring pendents are in their cleats on my boat.
            >>
            >> john
            >>
            >> */gmuller22 <gmuller22@...>/* wrote:
            >>
            >> Grant, they are predicting 20-25 kts steady SE winds with gusts to
            >> 35 kts. in your area. This is no worse than any typical coastal
            >> storm and will pass fairly quickly. If you're concerned about your
            >> boat I suggest you make sure your hatches are closed tightly, lines
            >> are properly secured (put on a few more if you can, it can't hurt)
            >> and that your fully fendered. Put a few more turns on your furled
            >> sail and wrap a rope around your entire mainsail cover and that
            >> should just about do it. If you're on a mooring you might want to
            >> make sure your mooring lines are sufficiently chafe guarded.
            >>
            >> --- In Sabresailboat@yahoogroups.com
            >> <mailto:Sabresailboat%40yahoogroups.com>, Grant Woodside
            >> <gewoodsiii@...> wrote:
            >> >
            >> > Do you have an opinion about pulling for Ernesto in the Annapolis
            >> area?
            >> >
            >> > Grant
            >> >
            >>
            >>
            >> ------------------------------------------------------------------------
            >> Yahoo! Messenger with Voice. Make PC-to-Phone Calls
            >> <http://us.rd.yahoo.com/mail_us/taglines/postman1/*http://us.rd.yahoo.com/evt=39663/*http://voice.yahoo.com>
            >> to the US (and 30+ countries) for 2¢/min or less.
            >>
            >>
            >
            >
            >
            > --
            > David
            > Atlantea, Sabre 38 MKII
            >
            >
            >
          • David Felsenthal
            I know of at least 3 J105s over the past 2 years that have broken rudder bearings or shaft support parts or stops due to untied wheels during northeasters at
            Message 5 of 22 , Sep 1, 2006
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              I know of at least 3 J105s over the past 2 years that have broken rudder
              bearings or shaft support parts or stops due to untied wheels during
              northeasters at the harbor mouth. Big seas, lots of rolling, light
              boats, broken parts.

              David


              David Evans wrote:
              >
              >
              > Most important I'd say is your number 4, chafing gear! Sails still cheaper
              > than boat!
              >
              > But good points by all about furled sail "preventers," both on the genoa
              > and the mainsail. The latter I've never seen but a fine idea.
              >
              > The steering gear issue is new to me also. Really?
              >
              > dge
              >
              > > In addition, if you expect seas, tie the wheel or tiller firmly, don't
              > > rely on the brake.
              > >
              > > Also tie the boom from the end to both port and starboard siddes, so it
              > > won't slop back and forth.
              > >
              > > I strongly second John's suggestion to tie the roller furling headsail.
              > >
              > > The most common problem's I've seen in storms are:
              > >
              > > Shredded roller furling headsail
              > > Broken steering gear due to swinging and rolling on a mooring
              > > Broken travelers from booms swinging
              > > Boats with mooring pennants chafed through
              > > Mainsails climbing the mast because they lacked a sail tie through the
              > > headboard and the cover came off
              > > And of course smaller motor boats flipped or swamped by big seas
              > >
              > > Can anyone add to or correct this list? It is my recollection from
              > > watching boats on moorings.
              > >
              > > David
              > >
              > > john kalinowski wrote:
              > >>
              > >>
              > >> Besides a line around the mainsail (better to remove the mainsail), one
              > >> should always have a preventer on their furling headsail. It is nothing
              > >> more than a sail tie looped twice around with a secure knot. Bonus
              > >> points for going through the clue. That way even if the furling line
              > >> let go, the sail cannot unroll.
              > >>
              > >> I have seen a new $6,000 sail shreded because this was not done.
              > >> Worst part is most insurance policies do not cover sails, so this piece
              > >> of line or webbing is your insurance... It is done automatically as
              > >> soon as the mooring pendents are in their cleats on my boat.
              > >>
              > >> john
              > >>
              > >> */gmuller22 <gmuller22@... <mailto:gmuller22%40yahoo.com>>/*
              > wrote:
              > >>
              > >> Grant, they are predicting 20-25 kts steady SE winds with gusts to
              > >> 35 kts. in your area. This is no worse than any typical coastal
              > >> storm and will pass fairly quickly. If you're concerned about your
              > >> boat I suggest you make sure your hatches are closed tightly, lines
              > >> are properly secured (put on a few more if you can, it can't hurt)
              > >> and that your fully fendered. Put a few more turns on your furled
              > >> sail and wrap a rope around your entire mainsail cover and that
              > >> should just about do it. If you're on a mooring you might want to
              > >> make sure your mooring lines are sufficiently chafe guarded.
              > >>
              > >> --- In Sabresailboat@yahoogroups.com
              > <mailto:Sabresailboat%40yahoogroups.com>
              > >> <mailto:Sabresailboat%40yahoogroups.com>, Grant Woodside
              > >> <gewoodsiii@...> wrote:
              > >> >
              > >> > Do you have an opinion about pulling for Ernesto in the Annapolis
              > >> area?
              > >> >
              > >> > Grant
              > >> >
              > >>
              > >>
              > >> ----------------------------------------------------------
              > >> Yahoo! Messenger with Voice. Make PC-to-Phone Calls
              > >>
              > <http://us.rd.yahoo.com/mail_us/taglines/postman1/*http://us.rd.yahoo.com/evt=39663/*http://voice.yahoo.com
              > <http://us.rd.yahoo.com/mail_us/taglines/postman1/*http://us.rd.yahoo.com/evt=39663/*http://voice.yahoo.com>>
              > >> to the US (and 30+ countries) for 2¢/min or less.
              > >>
              > >>
              > >
              > >
              > >
              > > --
              > > David
              > > Atlantea, Sabre 38 MKII
              > >
              > >
              > >
              >
              >

              --
              David
              Atlantea, Sabre 38 MKII
            • David Evans
              David, But those are J-boats, not Sabres! Live and learn. I suppose I can use the harness padeye near the wheel as a tie-off point. Or just loop around the
              Message 6 of 22 , Sep 1, 2006
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                David,
                But those are J-boats, not Sabres!

                Live and learn. I suppose I can use the harness padeye near the wheel as a
                tie-off point. Or just loop around the pedestal?

                As this topic gets beyond the current storm, I do remember that I've often
                wrapped the mainsail cover (but not John's preventer, which can always be
                done) and also tied off the boom.

                dge

                > I know of at least 3 J105s over the past 2 years that have broken rudder
                > bearings or shaft support parts or stops due to untied wheels during
                > northeasters at the harbor mouth. Big seas, lots of rolling, light
                > boats, broken parts.
                >
                > David
                >
                >
                > David Evans wrote:
                >>
                >>
                >> Most important I'd say is your number 4, chafing gear! Sails still
                >> cheaper
                >> than boat!
                >>
                >> But good points by all about furled sail "preventers," both on the genoa
                >> and the mainsail. The latter I've never seen but a fine idea.
                >>
                >> The steering gear issue is new to me also. Really?
                >>
                >> dge
                >>
                >> > In addition, if you expect seas, tie the wheel or tiller firmly,
                >> don't
                >> > rely on the brake.
                >> >
                >> > Also tie the boom from the end to both port and starboard siddes, so
                >> it
                >> > won't slop back and forth.
                >> >
                >> > I strongly second John's suggestion to tie the roller furling
                >> headsail.
                >> >
                >> > The most common problem's I've seen in storms are:
                >> >
                >> > Shredded roller furling headsail
                >> > Broken steering gear due to swinging and rolling on a mooring
                >> > Broken travelers from booms swinging
                >> > Boats with mooring pennants chafed through
                >> > Mainsails climbing the mast because they lacked a sail tie through
                >> the
                >> > headboard and the cover came off
                >> > And of course smaller motor boats flipped or swamped by big seas
                >> >
                >> > Can anyone add to or correct this list? It is my recollection from
                >> > watching boats on moorings.
                >> >
                >> > David
                >> >
                >> > john kalinowski wrote:
                >> >>
                >> >>
                >> >> Besides a line around the mainsail (better to remove the mainsail),
                >> one
                >> >> should always have a preventer on their furling headsail. It is
                >> nothing
                >> >> more than a sail tie looped twice around with a secure knot. Bonus
                >> >> points for going through the clue. That way even if the furling line
                >> >> let go, the sail cannot unroll.
                >> >>
                >> >> I have seen a new $6,000 sail shreded because this was not done.
                >> >> Worst part is most insurance policies do not cover sails, so this
                >> piece
                >> >> of line or webbing is your insurance... It is done automatically as
                >> >> soon as the mooring pendents are in their cleats on my boat.
                >> >>
                >> >> john
                >> >>
                >> >> */gmuller22 <gmuller22@... <mailto:gmuller22%40yahoo.com>>/*
                >> wrote:
                >> >>
                >> >> Grant, they are predicting 20-25 kts steady SE winds with gusts to
                >> >> 35 kts. in your area. This is no worse than any typical coastal
                >> >> storm and will pass fairly quickly. If you're concerned about your
                >> >> boat I suggest you make sure your hatches are closed tightly, lines
                >> >> are properly secured (put on a few more if you can, it can't hurt)
                >> >> and that your fully fendered. Put a few more turns on your furled
                >> >> sail and wrap a rope around your entire mainsail cover and that
                >> >> should just about do it. If you're on a mooring you might want to
                >> >> make sure your mooring lines are sufficiently chafe guarded.
                >> >>
                >> >> --- In Sabresailboat@yahoogroups.com
                >> <mailto:Sabresailboat%40yahoogroups.com>
                >> >> <mailto:Sabresailboat%40yahoogroups.com>, Grant Woodside
                >> >> <gewoodsiii@...> wrote:
                >> >> >
                >> >> > Do you have an opinion about pulling for Ernesto in the Annapolis
                >> >> area?
                >> >> >
                >> >> > Grant
                >> >> >
                >> >>
                >> >>
                >> >> ----------------------------------------------------------
                >> >> Yahoo! Messenger with Voice. Make PC-to-Phone Calls
                >> >>
                >> <http://us.rd.yahoo.com/mail_us/taglines/postman1/*http://us.rd.yahoo.com/evt=39663/*http://voice.yahoo.com
                >> <http://us.rd.yahoo.com/mail_us/taglines/postman1/*http://us.rd.yahoo.com/evt=39663/*http://voice.yahoo.com>>
                >> >> to the US (and 30+ countries) for 2¢/min or less.
                >> >>
                >> >>
                >> >
                >> >
                >> >
                >> > --
                >> > David
                >> > Atlantea, Sabre 38 MKII
                >> >
                >> >
                >> >
                >>
                >>
                >
                > --
                > David
                > Atlantea, Sabre 38 MKII
                >
                >
                >
              • gmuller22
                Grant, all the suggestions are good and sound, but they can be segregated by whether you are in a slip or moored. Tieing your wheel down and securing the boom
                Message 7 of 22 , Sep 1, 2006
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                  Grant, all the suggestions are good and sound, but they can be
                  segregated by whether you are in a slip or moored. Tieing your wheel
                  down and securing the boom is most important when you are on a
                  mooring and your boat is free to really rock and roll but is less of
                  a concern when in a slip. As to the preventer on the furled sail,
                  it's good insurance, but if you have a tight wrap and have put a lot
                  of turns on your furled sail (which will work down the sail and
                  provide a similar wrap to that on the wrapped mainsail) and have
                  your jib sheets secured, it should be OK. The real concern in a slip
                  is tieing your boat up so that pressure is minimized on your
                  fenders. After every storm you'll always find boats with sets of
                  collapsed fenders, so fender up and try to tie up so that the entire
                  load is not on the fenders. In any event, the latest check on your
                  area shows that the winds will be somewhat greater than forecast
                  earlier, but are not so high as to give you unnecessary concern
                  based on what you've done.

                  Gerard

                  --- In Sabresailboat@yahoogroups.com, Grant Woodside
                  <gewoodsiii@...> wrote:
                  >
                  > Eliza D is in a slip. Wish I had these suggestions before I went
                  to the
                  > boat last evening. These are obvious suggestions, but I didn't
                  think of
                  > them.
                  >
                  > o tie the wheel or tiller firmly, don't rely on the brake.
                  > o tie the boom from the end to both port and starboard sides
                  > o wrap a rope around your entire mainsail cover
                  > o have a preventer on their furling headsail
                  >
                  > I did
                  >
                  > o remove the cowls and replace with caps
                  > o pull the boat forward in the slip so the narrower stern instead
                  of
                  > the beam is at the poles
                  > o add a second set of bow lines
                  >
                  > Grant
                  >
                  >
                  > --- David Felsenthal <atlantea@...> wrote:
                  >
                  > > In addition, if you expect seas, tie the wheel or tiller firmly,
                  > > don't
                  > > rely on the brake.
                  > >
                  > > Also tie the boom from the end to both port and starboard
                  siddes, so
                  > > it
                  > > won't slop back and forth.
                  > >
                  > > I strongly second John's suggestion to tie the roller furling
                  > > headsail.
                  > >
                  > > The most common problem's I've seen in storms are:
                  > >
                  > > Shredded roller furling headsail
                  > > Broken steering gear due to swinging and rolling on a mooring
                  > > Broken travelers from booms swinging
                  > > Boats with mooring pennants chafed through
                  > > Mainsails climbing the mast because they lacked a sail tie
                  through
                  > > the
                  > > headboard and the cover came off
                  > > And of course smaller motor boats flipped or swamped by big seas
                  > >
                  > > Can anyone add to or correct this list? It is my recollection
                  from
                  > > watching boats on moorings.
                  > >
                  > > David
                  > >
                  > > john kalinowski wrote:
                  > > >
                  > > >
                  > > > Besides a line around the mainsail (better to remove the
                  mainsail),
                  > > one
                  > > > should always have a preventer on their furling headsail. It is
                  > > nothing
                  > > > more than a sail tie looped twice around with a secure knot.
                  Bonus
                  > > > points for going through the clue. That way even if the
                  furling
                  > > line
                  > > > let go, the sail cannot unroll.
                  > > >
                  > > > I have seen a new $6,000 sail shreded because this was not
                  done.
                  > > > Worst part is most insurance policies do not cover sails, so
                  this
                  > > piece
                  > > > of line or webbing is your insurance... It is done
                  automatically
                  > > as
                  > > > soon as the mooring pendents are in their cleats on my boat.
                  > > >
                  > > > john
                  > > >
                  > > > */gmuller22 <gmuller22@...>/* wrote:
                  > > >
                  > > > Grant, they are predicting 20-25 kts steady SE winds with
                  gusts
                  > > to
                  > > > 35 kts. in your area. This is no worse than any typical
                  coastal
                  > > > storm and will pass fairly quickly. If you're concerned
                  about
                  > > your
                  > > > boat I suggest you make sure your hatches are closed
                  tightly,
                  > > lines
                  > > > are properly secured (put on a few more if you can, it
                  can't
                  > > hurt)
                  > > > and that your fully fendered. Put a few more turns on your
                  > > furled
                  > > > sail and wrap a rope around your entire mainsail cover and
                  that
                  > > > should just about do it. If you're on a mooring you might
                  want
                  > > to
                  > > > make sure your mooring lines are sufficiently chafe
                  guarded.
                  > > >
                  > > > --- In Sabresailboat@yahoogroups.com
                  > > > <mailto:Sabresailboat%40yahoogroups.com>, Grant Woodside
                  > > > <gewoodsiii@> wrote:
                  > > > >
                  > > > > Do you have an opinion about pulling for Ernesto in the
                  > > Annapolis
                  > > > area?
                  > > > >
                  > > > > Grant
                  > > > >
                  > > >
                  > > >
                  > > >
                  > >
                  > -------------------------------------------------------------------
                  -----
                  > > > Yahoo! Messenger with Voice. Make PC-to-Phone Calls
                  > > >
                  > >
                  >
                  <http://us.rd.yahoo.com/mail_us/taglines/postman1/*http://us.rd.yahoo
                  .com/evt=39663/*http://voice.yahoo.com>
                  > >
                  > > > to the US (and 30+ countries) for 2¢/min or less.
                  > > >
                  > > >
                  > >
                  > >
                  > >
                  > > --
                  > > David
                  > > Atlantea, Sabre 38 MKII
                  > >
                  > >
                  > >
                  >
                • Jim Starkey
                  ... It can be much worse than that. Marblehead has had any number of cases where the headsail got loose, broken the mooring line, and the loose boat took out
                  Message 8 of 22 , Sep 1, 2006
                  • 0 Attachment
                    john kalinowski wrote:
                    > Besides a line around the mainsail (better to remove the mainsail),
                    > one should always have a preventer on their furling headsail. It is
                    > nothing more than a sail tie looped twice around with a secure knot.
                    > Bonus points for going through the clue. That way even if the
                    > furling line let go, the sail cannot unroll.
                    >
                    > I have seen a new $6,000 sail shreded because this was not done.
                    > Worst part is most insurance policies do not cover sails, so this
                    > piece of line or webbing is your insurance... It is done
                    > automatically as soon as the mooring pendents are in their cleats on
                    > my boat.
                    >
                    It can be much worse than that. Marblehead has had any number of cases
                    where the headsail got loose, broken the mooring line, and the loose
                    boat took out a half dozen others. A good friend, in fact, woke up one
                    morning to find his wrecked Tartan 34 on the front page of the Boston Globe.

                    For a real hurricane, taking down the headsail is an even better solution.

                    --

                    Jim Starkey, Senior Software Architect
                    MySQL AB, www.mysql.com
                    978 526-1376
                  • Curtis Koster
                    If you just do one thing, take the suggestion to secure the roller furling jib with a sail tie. Think of it: On lline, the furling line goes and the show
                    Message 9 of 22 , Sep 1, 2006
                    • 0 Attachment
                      If you just do one thing, take the suggestion to secure the roller furling
                      jib with a sail tie.

                      Think of it: On lline, the furling line goes and the show begins. I have
                      even seen this happen with a boat blowing off its jackstands on City Island.

                      Curt Koster
                    • Peter Tollini
                      One more - If you are in a slip and expect high water, spike the pilings so the lines can t be pulled up and off of them. I did that in final prep for Isabel
                      Message 10 of 22 , Sep 1, 2006
                      • 0 Attachment
                        One more -
                        If you are in a slip and expect high water, spike the pilings so the lines can't be pulled up and off of them.  I did that in final prep for Isabel and it paid off.  The 7' rise was actually above some of our pilings, but the lines stayed connected, even though the loop on the piling was under water.   Running lots of very long docklines, especially springs, will let the boat rise, but stay positioned in the slip.
                        Pete

                         
                        On 9/1/06, gmuller22 <gmuller22@...> wrote:

                        Grant, all the suggestions are good and sound, but they can be
                        segregated by whether you are in a slip or moored. Tieing your wheel
                        down and securing the boom is most important when you are on a
                        mooring and your boat is free to really rock and roll but is less of
                        a concern when in a slip. As to the preventer on the furled sail,
                        it's good insurance, but if you have a tight wrap and have put a lot
                        of turns on your furled sail (which will work down the sail and
                        provide a similar wrap to that on the wrapped mainsail) and have
                        your jib sheets secured, it should be OK. The real concern in a slip
                        is tieing your boat up so that pressure is minimized on your
                        fenders. After every storm you'll always find boats with sets of
                        collapsed fenders, so fender up and try to tie up so that the entire
                        load is not on the fenders. In any event, the latest check on your
                        area shows that the winds will be somewhat greater than forecast
                        earlier, but are not so high as to give you unnecessary concern
                        based on what you've done.

                        Gerard

                        --- In Sabresailboat@yahoogroups.com, Grant Woodside


                        <gewoodsiii@...> wrote:
                        >
                        > Eliza D is in a slip. Wish I had these suggestions before I went
                        to the
                        > boat last evening. These are obvious suggestions, but I didn't
                        think of
                        > them.
                        >
                        > o tie the wheel or tiller firmly, don't rely on the brake.
                        > o tie the boom from the end to both port and starboard sides
                        > o wrap a rope around your entire mainsail cover
                        > o have a preventer on their furling headsail
                        >
                        > I did
                        >
                        > o remove the cowls and replace with caps
                        > o pull the boat forward in the slip so the narrower stern instead
                        of
                        > the beam is at the poles
                        > o add a second set of bow lines
                        >
                        > Grant
                        >
                        >
                        > --- David Felsenthal <atlantea@...> wrote:
                        >
                        > > In addition, if you expect seas, tie the wheel or tiller firmly,
                        > > don't
                        > > rely on the brake.
                        > >
                        > > Also tie the boom from the end to both port and starboard
                        siddes, so
                        > > it
                        > > won't slop back and forth.
                        > >
                        > > I strongly second John's suggestion to tie the roller furling
                        > > headsail.
                        > >
                        > > The most common problem's I've seen in storms are:
                        > >
                        > > Shredded roller furling headsail
                        > > Broken steering gear due to swinging and rolling on a mooring
                        > > Broken travelers from booms swinging
                        > > Boats with mooring pennants chafed through
                        > > Mainsails climbing the mast because they lacked a sail tie
                        through
                        > > the
                        > > headboard and the cover came off
                        > > And of course smaller motor boats flipped or swamped by big seas
                        > >
                        > > Can anyone add to or correct this list? It is my recollection
                        from
                        > > watching boats on moorings.
                        > >
                        > > David
                        > >
                        > > john kalinowski wrote:
                        > > >
                        > > >
                        > > > Besides a line around the mainsail (better to remove the
                        mainsail),
                        > > one
                        > > > should always have a preventer on their furling headsail. It is
                        > > nothing
                        > > > more than a sail tie looped twice around with a secure knot.
                        Bonus
                        > > > points for going through the clue. That way even if the
                        furling
                        > > line
                        > > > let go, the sail cannot unroll.
                        > > >
                        > > > I have seen a new $6,000 sail shreded because this was not
                        done.
                        > > > Worst part is most insurance policies do not cover sails, so
                        this
                        > > piece
                        > > > of line or webbing is your insurance... It is done
                        automatically
                        > > as
                        > > > soon as the mooring pendents are in their cleats on my boat.
                        > > >
                        > > > john
                        > > >
                        > > > */gmuller22 <gmuller22@...>/* wrote:
                        > > >
                        > > > Grant, they are predicting 20-25 kts steady SE winds with
                        gusts
                        > > to
                        > > > 35 kts. in your area. This is no worse than any typical
                        coastal
                        > > > storm and will pass fairly quickly. If you're concerned
                        about
                        > > your
                        > > > boat I suggest you make sure your hatches are closed
                        tightly,
                        > > lines
                        > > > are properly secured (put on a few more if you can, it
                        can't
                        > > hurt)
                        > > > and that your fully fendered. Put a few more turns on your
                        > > furled
                        > > > sail and wrap a rope around your entire mainsail cover and
                        that
                        > > > should just about do it. If you're on a mooring you might
                        want
                        > > to
                        > > > make sure your mooring lines are sufficiently chafe
                        guarded.
                        > > >
                        > > > --- In Sabresailboat@yahoogroups.com
                        > > > <mailto: Sabresailboat%40yahoogroups.com>, Grant Woodside
                        > > > <gewoodsiii@> wrote:
                        > > > >
                        > > > > Do you have an opinion about pulling for Ernesto in the
                        > > Annapolis
                        > > > area?
                        > > > >
                        > > > > Grant
                        > > > >
                        > > >
                        > > >
                        > > >
                        > >
                        > ----------------------------------------------------------
                        -----
                        > > > Yahoo! Messenger with Voice. Make PC-to-Phone Calls
                        > > >
                        > >
                        >
                        <http://us.rd.yahoo.com/mail_us/taglines/postman1/*http://us.rd.yahoo
                        .com/evt=39663/*http://voice.yahoo.com>
                        > >
                        > > > to the US (and 30+ countries) for 2¢/min or less.
                        > > >
                        > > >
                        > >
                        > >
                        > >
                        > > --
                        > > David
                        > > Atlantea, Sabre 38 MKII
                        > >
                        > >
                        > >
                        >


                      • gmuller22
                        Frankly Jim, for a real hurricane, you dispense with all the above advice and simply haul the boat out. In many ways, hurricanes make decision making about a
                        Message 11 of 22 , Sep 1, 2006
                        • 0 Attachment
                          Frankly Jim, for a real hurricane, you dispense with all the above
                          advice and simply haul the boat out. In many ways, hurricanes make
                          decision making about a lot of things real-l-l simple.

                          Gerard




                          --- In Sabresailboat@yahoogroups.com, Jim Starkey <jas@...> wrote:
                          >
                          > john kalinowski wrote:
                          > > Besides a line around the mainsail (better to remove the
                          mainsail),
                          > > one should always have a preventer on their furling headsail. It
                          is
                          > > nothing more than a sail tie looped twice around with a secure
                          knot.
                          > > Bonus points for going through the clue. That way even if the
                          > > furling line let go, the sail cannot unroll.
                          > >
                          > > I have seen a new $6,000 sail shreded because this was not done.
                          > > Worst part is most insurance policies do not cover sails, so
                          this
                          > > piece of line or webbing is your insurance... It is done
                          > > automatically as soon as the mooring pendents are in their
                          cleats on
                          > > my boat.
                          > >
                          > It can be much worse than that. Marblehead has had any number of
                          cases
                          > where the headsail got loose, broken the mooring line, and the
                          loose
                          > boat took out a half dozen others. A good friend, in fact, woke
                          up one
                          > morning to find his wrecked Tartan 34 on the front page of the
                          Boston Globe.
                          >
                          > For a real hurricane, taking down the headsail is an even better
                          solution.
                          >
                          > --
                          >
                          > Jim Starkey, Senior Software Architect
                          > MySQL AB, www.mysql.com
                          > 978 526-1376
                          >
                        • Jim Starkey
                          ... That s not always feasible, and in many cases, not necessary. We have a well protected harbor with good moorings that has served us well for three or four
                          Message 12 of 22 , Sep 1, 2006
                          • 0 Attachment
                            gmuller22 wrote:
                            > Frankly Jim, for a real hurricane, you dispense with all the above
                            > advice and simply haul the boat out. In many ways, hurricanes make
                            > decision making about a lot of things real-l-l simple.
                            >
                            >
                            That's not always feasible, and in many cases, not necessary. We have a
                            well protected harbor with good moorings that has served us well for
                            three or four hurricanes. Boats moored outside of the harbor have had
                            trouble (we lost George Patton's When and If during a late fall gales),
                            but so far, no trouble inside the harbor except to shredded headsails.
                            The reason that pulling often isn't feasible is that when a hurricane,
                            everyone is pretty busy, including the folks at the two boatyards in
                            town. They probably wouldn't be able to pull ever boat in the harbor
                            even if fully staffed, and a full staff isn't even a remote
                            possibility. The local problem is that there are wires between the
                            travel lifts and the major storage areas, so boats must be unrigged, a
                            labor intensive activity. In practice, the yards will give priority to
                            customers moored outside the harbor, so we lucky guys inside need to
                            tend to ourselves.

                            I can't speak for boats moored in marinas -- those things are almost
                            unknown in these parts -- but I think it is more prudent to have a well
                            thought out plan for hurricane preparations than to hope that the yard
                            will get to you in time. The drill around here is to remove the
                            headsail, heavily lash the main, lower burgees, and take off any drag
                            inducing stuff (wheel cover, for example). Most people run an extra
                            line from the mast to the mooring and leave a rigged anchor on deck just
                            in case. It is also considered *extremely* bad manners not to take
                            these precautions.

                            Our club also has a standing hurricane committee to oversee preparations
                            and to stand by at the club during the storm.

                            --

                            Jim Starkey, Senior Software Architect
                            MySQL AB, www.mysql.com
                            978 526-1376
                          • john kalinowski
                            Bettter to tie off on the coaming cleats to the and give the line a fighting chance of doing it s job. Myself, I pull the sail and if it is a major storm, I
                            Message 13 of 22 , Sep 2, 2006
                            • 0 Attachment
                              Bettter to tie off on the coaming cleats to the and give the line a fighting chance of doing it's job.
                               
                              Myself, I pull the sail and if it is a major storm, I pull the boom too.
                               
                              With a loose footed mainsail, you just redo the sailties to secure only the mainsail and not the boom. Pull the clevis pin at the outhaul, undo the gooseneck and slide out the mast slugs before pulling forward 3 feet and the slug on the outhaul releases. Store on the floor of the boat.  Makes reinstalling a snap as you did not have to pull the battens.  Less windage means the mooring gears doesn't have to work as hard.
                               
                              Regards
                               
                                john

                              David Evans <dave@...> wrote:
                              David,
                              But those are J-boats, not Sabres!

                              Live and learn. I suppose I can use the harness padeye near the wheel as a
                              tie-off point. Or just loop around the pedestal?

                              As this topic gets beyond the current storm, I do remember that I've often
                              wrapped the mainsail cover (but not John's preventer, which can always be
                              done) and also tied off the boom.

                              dge

                              > I know of at least 3 J105s over the past 2 years that have broken rudder
                              > bearings or shaft support parts or stops due to untied wheels during
                              > northeasters at the harbor mouth. Big seas, lots of rolling, light
                              > boats, broken parts.
                              >
                              > David
                              >
                              >
                              > David Evans wrote:
                              >>
                              >>
                              >> Most important I'd say is your number 4, chafing gear! Sails still
                              >> cheaper
                              >> than boat!
                              >>
                              >> But good points by all about furled sail "preventers, " both on the genoa
                              >> and the mainsail. The latter I've never seen but a fine idea.
                              >>
                              >> The steering gear issue is new to me also. Really?
                              >>
                              >> dge
                              >>
                              >> > In addition, if you expect seas, tie the wheel or tiller firmly,
                              >> don't
                              >> > rely on the brake.
                              >> >
                              >> > Also tie the boom from the end to both port and starboard siddes, so
                              >> it
                              >> > won't slop back and forth.
                              >> >
                              >> > I strongly second John's suggestion to tie the roller furling
                              >> headsail.
                              >> >
                              >> > The most common problem's I've seen in storms are:
                              >> >
                              >> > Shredded roller furling headsail
                              >> > Broken steering gear due to swinging and rolling on a mooring
                              >> > Broken travelers from booms swinging
                              >> > Boats with mooring pennants chafed through
                              >> > Mainsails climbing the mast because they lacked a sail tie through
                              >> the
                              >> > headboard and the cover came off
                              >> > And of course smaller motor boats flipped or swamped by big seas
                              >> >
                              >> > Can anyone add to or correct this list? It is my recollection from
                              >> > watching boats on moorings.
                              >> >
                              >> > David
                              >> >
                              >> > john kalinowski wrote:
                              >> >>
                              >> >>
                              >> >> Besides a line around the mainsail (better to remove the mainsail),
                              >> one
                              >> >> should always have a preventer on their furling headsail. It is
                              >> nothing
                              >> >> more than a sail tie looped twice around with a secure knot. Bonus
                              >> >> points for going through the clue. That way even if the furling line
                              >> >> let go, the sail cannot unroll.
                              >> >>
                              >> >> I have seen a new $6,000 sail shreded because this was not done.
                              >> >> Worst part is most insurance policies do not cover sails, so this
                              >> piece
                              >> >> of line or webbing is your insurance... It is done automatically as
                              >> >> soon as the mooring pendents are in their cleats on my boat.
                              >> >>
                              >> >> john
                              >> >>
                              >> >> */gmuller22 <gmuller22@yahoo. com <mailto:gmuller22% 40yahoo.com> >/*
                              >> wrote:
                              >> >>
                              >> >> Grant, they are predicting 20-25 kts steady SE winds with gusts to
                              >> >> 35 kts. in your area. This is no worse than any typical coastal
                              >> >> storm and will pass fairly quickly. If you're concerned about your
                              >> >> boat I suggest you make sure your hatches are closed tightly, lines
                              >> >> are properly secured (put on a few more if you can, it can't hurt)
                              >> >> and that your fully fendered. Put a few more turns on your furled
                              >> >> sail and wrap a rope around your entire mainsail cover and that
                              >> >> should just about do it. If you're on a mooring you might want to
                              >> >> make sure your mooring lines are sufficiently chafe guarded.
                              >> >>
                              >> >> --- In Sabresailboat@ yahoogroups. com
                              >> <mailto:Sabresailbo at%40yahoogroups .com>
                              >> >> <mailto:Sabresailbo at%40yahoogroups .com>, Grant Woodside
                              >> >> <gewoodsiii@ ...> wrote:
                              >> >> >
                              >> >> > Do you have an opinion about pulling for Ernesto in the Annapolis
                              >> >> area?
                              >> >> >
                              >> >> > Grant
                              >> >> >
                              >> >>
                              >> >>
                              >> >> ------------ --------- --------- --------- --------- --------- -
                              >> >> Yahoo! Messenger with Voice. Make PC-to-Phone Calls
                              >> >>
                              >> <http://us.rd. yahoo.com/ mail_us/taglines /postman1/ *http://us. rd.yahoo. com/evt=39663/ *http://voice. yahoo.com
                              >> <http://us.rd. yahoo.com/ mail_us/taglines /postman1/ *http://us. rd.yahoo. com/evt=39663/ *http://voice. yahoo.com>>
                              >> >> to the US (and 30+ countries) for 2¢/min or less.
                              >> >>
                              >> >>
                              >> >
                              >> >
                              >> >
                              >> > --
                              >> > David
                              >> > Atlantea, Sabre 38 MKII
                              >> >
                              >> >
                              >> >
                              >>
                              >>
                              >
                              > --
                              > David
                              > Atlantea, Sabre 38 MKII
                              >
                              >
                              >



                              Get your own web address for just $1.99/1st yr. We'll help. Yahoo! Small Business.

                            • john kalinowski
                              When I comes to securing you headsail, do it every time you leave the boat and not just a blow. I had a friend you bought a used 43 foot boat to cruise with.
                              Message 14 of 22 , Sep 2, 2006
                              • 0 Attachment
                                When I comes to securing you headsail, do it every time you leave the boat and not just a blow.
                                 
                                I had a friend you bought a used 43 foot boat to cruise with.
                                First week he had it, Link and the Mrs. anchored in a river in Westport Ma to go ashore to have lunch.  They sat there eatting their meal when a fast moving squawl hit.  he watched helplessly as the headsail unrolled and proceded to drag the boat at high speed into a concrete bridge abbutment of a state highway (eg BIG chunk of Concrete). Only thing he had going for him was the boat was an ex-rental and had 6" rubstrip to protect it from morons who do not know know how to dock.  Those took most the damage.

                                Curtis Koster <cpk@...> wrote:
                                If you just do one thing, take the suggestion to secure the roller furling
                                jib with a sail tie.

                                Think of it: On lline, the furling line goes and the show begins. I have
                                even seen this happen with a boat blowing off its jackstands on City Island.

                                Curt Koster



                                Do you Yahoo!?
                                Everyone is raving about the all-new Yahoo! Mail.

                              • godwin jones
                                I got ready to send a note yesterday about noon as Ernesto was raging much harder than forecast on lower Bay. However we lost cable and with it my connection.
                                Message 15 of 22 , Sep 2, 2006
                                • 0 Attachment
                                  I got ready to send a note yesterday about noon as Ernesto was raging much harder than forecast on lower Bay.  However we lost cable and with it my connection.
                                  We had water 4 ft above average high all day with another foot added as the low pressure eye went by.  Gained that 12" in about 5 minutes and dropped just as quickly 45 minutes later!  Water was about 3 ft over dock at highest.  Waded in to slack off starboard stern line which was tight with rising water.  Winds gusted all day and were in 60-65 range vs 35 forecast. 
                                  Thursday afternoon I had put the cover on the bimini, added extra lines and put fender board and large bumpers.  Sure was glad I did as Ernesto gave us all we could take - water as high as Isabel and winds blew much longer.  We watched canoes, dock boxes, kayaks, tables, benches etc flow by all day - took some by more surprise that others.  Had I expected this much or more, I would have wrapped main cover with 1/2 line, removed the dodger and removed the genoa as well as anchored out in creek away from the dock.  Water stayed fairly smooth.  Winds took less than 10 minutes to quit completely once eye passed.
                                  One other thing I have not seen mentioned by others is have the free end of dock lines where you can adjust them - in my case on the dock cleats/pilings.  I could not get on the boat because it was too high above dock even though I am 6'6".  I needed to ease off as the water rose!
                                  An unusual tropical storm that reiterated need to prepare for the worst.
                                   
                                  Godwin
                                  Bojangles S-34-II
                                  Wilon Creek off Piankatank River, Chesapeake

                                  David Evans <dave@...> wrote:
                                  Most important I'd say is your number 4, chafing gear! Sails still cheaper
                                  than boat!

                                  But good points by all about furled sail "preventers, " both on the genoa
                                  and the mainsail. The latter I've never seen but a fine idea.

                                  The steering gear issue is new to me also. Really?

                                  dge

                                  > In addition, if you expect seas, tie the wheel or tiller firmly, don't
                                  > rely on the brake.
                                  >
                                  > Also tie the boom from the end to both port and starboard siddes, so it
                                  > won't slop back and forth.
                                  >
                                  > I strongly second John's suggestion to tie the roller furling headsail.
                                  >
                                  > The most common problem's I've seen in storms are:
                                  >
                                  > Shredded roller furling headsail
                                  > Broken steering gear due to swinging and rolling on a mooring
                                  > Broken travelers from booms swinging
                                  > Boats with mooring pennants chafed through
                                  > Mainsails climbing the mast because they lacked a sail tie through the
                                  > headboard and the cover came off
                                  > And of course smaller motor boats flipped or swamped by big seas
                                  >
                                  > Can anyone add to or correct this list? It is my recollection from
                                  > watching boats on moorings.
                                  >
                                  > David
                                  >
                                  > john kalinowski wrote:
                                  >>
                                  >>
                                  >> Besides a line around the mainsail (better to remove the mainsail), one
                                  >> should always have a preventer on their furling headsail. It is nothing
                                  >> more than a sail tie looped twice around with a secure knot. Bonus
                                  >> points for going through the clue. That way even if the furling line
                                  >> let go, the sail cannot unroll.
                                  >>
                                  >> I have seen a new $6,000 sail shreded because this was not done.
                                  >> Worst part is most insurance policies do not cover sails, so this piece
                                  >> of line or webbing is your insurance... It is done automatically as
                                  >> soon as the mooring pendents are in their cleats on my boat.
                                  >>
                                  >> john
                                  >>
                                  >> */gmuller22 <gmuller22@yahoo. com>/* wrote:
                                  >>
                                  >> Grant, they are predicting 20-25 kts steady SE winds with gusts to
                                  >> 35 kts. in your area. This is no worse than any typical coastal
                                  >> storm and will pass fairly quickly. If you're concerned about your
                                  >> boat I suggest you make sure your hatches are closed tightly, lines
                                  >> are properly secured (put on a few more if you can, it can't hurt)
                                  >> and that your fully fendered. Put a few more turns on your furled
                                  >> sail and wrap a rope around your entire mainsail cover and that
                                  >> should just about do it. If you're on a mooring you might want to
                                  >> make sure your mooring lines are sufficiently chafe guarded.
                                  >>
                                  >> --- In Sabresailboat@ yahoogroups. com
                                  >> <mailto:Sabresailbo at%40yahoogroups .com>, Grant Woodside
                                  >> <gewoodsiii@ ...> wrote:
                                  >> >
                                  >> > Do you have an opinion about pulling for Ernesto in the Annapolis
                                  >> area?
                                  >> >
                                  >> > Grant
                                  >> >
                                  >>
                                  >>
                                  >> ------------ --------- --------- --------- --------- --------- -
                                  >> Yahoo! Messenger with Voice. Make PC-to-Phone Calls
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                                • Curtis Koster
                                  For what it s worth, I unexpectedly had to go to Yachthaven West and the Compo Beach Marina (Westport) this pm. Counted two mainsail covers starting to become
                                  Message 16 of 22 , Sep 2, 2006
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                                    For what it's worth, I unexpectedly had to go to Yachthaven West and the
                                    Compo Beach Marina (Westport) this pm. Counted two mainsail covers starting
                                    to become undone and ten unfurled jibs. Two jibs were in tatters, two were
                                    on trailers and had 'capsized' six were flailing about wildly. Curt Koster
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