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Re: [SabreSailboat] In the Market for a Sabre 38 MK I, seeking opinions

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  • mookiesurfs
    Oh, that was a slow pitch right over the middle of the plate. Nicely hit to the centerfield bleachers though. A good discussion can be had with s/v versus s/y.
    Message 1 of 20 , Jul 26, 2013
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      Oh, that was a slow pitch right over the middle of the plate. Nicely hit to the centerfield bleachers though. A good discussion can be had with s/v versus s/y.
      Bill B


      Sent from an elegant interface with limited functionality, while traveling 

      On Jul 26, 2013, at 3:56 PM, Peter Tollini <sabre30@...> wrote:

       

      Glen says "series" Sabre's list of models uses Mark for all but the 30 and Series for the 30, so I don't think it matters the slightest.


      On Fri, Jul 26, 2013 at 2:18 PM, John Zeratsky <john@...> wrote:
       

      So when we say "38 mkII," do we really mean "38 Series II"?



      On Friday, July 26, 2013, Peter Tollini wrote:
       

      George -
      The Mk is an abbreviation for "Mark," as in Mark II. To further confuse you, Sabre Corp. uses "Series" as in Series I or Series II. Either way, it denotes an update to the design.  Some were subtle changes to the earlier design, as in the 28.  For the 34 and 38, the Series II is a completely different boat. For the 30, Series II was an update to Series I, but Series III is a totally different boat.
      Luckily, Sabre has posted brochures for almost all past models, so you can see the differences in appearances and specs at http://sabreyachts.com/owner-resources/faq#Used

      If you are not totally confused yet, the 425 is an update to the 42, but the 426 is a completely different boat, from a different designer.  Also, there is a 38, a 38 Series II, different boats, same designer, and a 386, different boat and designer.
      Good luck!
      Pete


      On Fri, Jul 26, 2013 at 1:11 PM, George Homme <georgeh@...> wrote:
       

      What’s the “MK” mean in sailboat model numbers?  I know I’m gonna cringe when I hear the answer but I’ve got to lean somehow !   While I’m at it, difference between an MKI and MKII?

       

      Thanks!

       

      g

       

      From: Sabresailboat@yahoogroups.com [mailto:Sabresailboat@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Peter Tollini
      Sent: Friday, July 26, 2013 12:04 PM
      To: Sabresailboat@yahoogroups.com
      Subject: Re: [SabreSailboat] Re: In the Market for a Sabre 38 MK I, seeking opinions

       

       

      I've sailed on Bill's former 38 in a stiff breeze and agree with all of his points. 

       

       "Tenderness" is an issue that gets more angst than it deserves, especially in a masthead cruising boat. Just go to a smaller jib, (a roller furling jib with a foam/rope luff pad and reefing marks can go from a 140 to a decent 110, keeping a Sabre happy in 95% of the conditions you'll sail in), then reef the main, keeping the boat balanced, as the wind picks up.

      I had to good fortune to spend some time talking about boats over drinks with the late Gary Mull. One of his memorable comments, and there were many, concerned tenderness.  He said, "What's easier for you, tucking in a reef or extending your $%^& mast?  You can't have it both ways."   A boat that has sparkling performance in light to moderate air, is going to need to shorten sail above 15-18 kts, depending on the overlap of the #1.

      A boat that is stiff at 20 kts under full sail, will likely be a slug at 10 kts. Think Westsail (WetSnail) 32.

       

      A bigger issue to me is performance off the wind.  The masthead rig and high aspect main require a whisker pole at a minimum, and preferably a cruising chute, for off the wind speed to match the upwind and reaching performance of our Sabres.

       

      Pete

       

      On Fri, Jul 26, 2013 at 10:29 AM, <mookiesurfs@...> wrote:

       

      The 38 MK I and IIs are wonderful boats; you can't go too far wrong with either. I had a MK I for about nine years and would highly recommend one. You now know about the mast step. The step condition can depend on the particular configuration along with owner maintenance. The 38s don't have a bulkhead at the mast, so you're only checking the step and sole. Water retention inside the base of the mast is the issue in a 38. Retained water may eventually find its way through the fasteners in the base and into the wood stringer underneath. A roller furling mast will have a solid step, as that mast section cannot hold water. A boot will not help this issue, as the problem is water inside the mast section, and it gets there from halyard entries and exits, sheave boxes, and all the other opening in the mast.

       

      These boats


    • Jan
      Julie, The tenderness issue is conquored by reefing just a bit earlier than you would expect. The water enters by coming down inside the mast. When we
      Message 2 of 20 , Jul 28, 2013
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        Julie,

        The tenderness issue is conquored by reefing just a bit earlier than you would expect. The water enters by coming down inside the mast. When we unstepped it to paint it, we installed a neoprene (sp!) rubber mat under the aluminum mast step fitting so the water would be directed into the bilge and not onto the mast step. It seems to help. We leave the boat in the water in a marina and come north to avoid the hot Mexican summer months. Yes, we know we are fortunate to be able to do what we are doing. To be able to do it in a Sabre, makes in all the more wonderful!

        Jan

        --- In Sabresailboat@yahoogroups.com, "juliekmac@..." <juliekmac@...> wrote:
        >
        > Yes, we're aware of the "tenderness" issue. Funny, but people say the same about the Ericson.
        >
        > We will look at the mast step issue closely. I wonder if a good boot will help prevent the problem?
        >
        > Otherwise, thanks for your input. Would love to be sailing in Mexico! Do you liveaboard for the 6 months, and go no the hard the other?
        >
        > --- In Sabresailboat@yahoogroups.com, "Jan" <workshoe99@> wrote:
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > > Julie,
        > >
        > > In '05 we bought S38 MkI #41 and have had a wonderful experience. For the same reason as you, we wanted a Sabre but could not afford a newer one. We cruise it on the west coast of Mexico for 6 months of the year. We have the fin keel. She sails beautifully but being a MkI, she is a bit tender when the breeze blows up being only 11'-6" in beam. Do check carefully the area around the mast step on any Sabre you look at. That is their design flaw but everything else is just so well thought out that we think we are much better off than many of the newer boats with storage, tankage, motion, cockpit comfort- the list is very long. We too looked at Ericson 38s- nice but not Sabre quality. Good luck with your search and you are on the right track.
        > >
        > > Jan S38 Mk I "Capriccio", Puerto Vallarta, Mex.
        > >
        > > --- In Sabresailboat@yahoogroups.com, "juliekmac@" <juliekmac@> wrote:
        > > >
        > > > My partner and I are in the market for a 1980's vintage 38-40 sloop.
        > > > We eyeballed our first Sabre at last year's Annapolis show, and were quite impressed.
        > > >
        > > > We can't afford a new(ish) boat, but we're still interested in a Sabre.
        > > >
        > > > The boat will be used on the Great Lakes, mostly on 3-4 hour day sails. We'll be logging a few 50-150 mile sails per year.
        > > >
        > > > We value solid construction, good craftmenship and a fun boat to sale. We're both partial to comfortable, traditional interiors, too. We think the fin keel might be best for our area.
        > > >
        > > > If you have input on the quality of the boat, and it's sail handling characteristics; we would appreciate it. We've already seen a Sabre 34, but felt it too small for our needs.
        > > >
        > > > Other than Sabre, we've been considering a comparably sized Ericson 38, and Moody which are a few years newer than the Sabre's in our price range.
        > > >
        > >
        >
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