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Re: Solar Panel systems

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  • carlsonm54
    Check out how to size the system you need here
    Message 1 of 5 , Jul 16, 2013
      Check out how to size the system you need here

      http://www.westmarine.com/webapp/wcs/stores/servlet/WestAdvisorView?langId=-1&storeId=11151&page=Charging-with-Solar-Panels#.UeV8TD5ASLM

      Buy your charge controller here

      http://www.morningstarcorp.com/en/sun-saver

      We got our US produced panels here

      http://www.ramsond.com/solarprod.php

      --- In Sabresailboat@yahoogroups.com, "William Kellett" <w.kellett@...> wrote:
      >
      > I am considering adding one or more solar panels to maintain my two
      > batteries and reduce the need to run the engine ony for charging them. I
      > would like to see what other Sabre owners have done by way of selection
      > electrical system design and panel location. I do have a radar mast on my
      > S28 and may attach some small panels to iot.
      >
      >
      >
      > Thanks, Bill
      >
    • Jim Starkey
      Maintaining the batteries when the vessel is idle and reducing engine running time are quite distinct cases. Solar cells are very low output compared with
      Message 2 of 5 , Jul 17, 2013
        Maintaining the batteries when the vessel is idle and reducing engine running time are quite distinct cases.  Solar cells are very low output compared with either a typical load or alternator capacity.  Generating current for most of the day for a week against no load at all is a significant about of current, but compared to a typical load for a boat in use it's next to noise.

        If you want to reduce engine time add (in order of priority) a smart voltage regulator then a higher capacity alternator.  The net gain from either (let alone both) dwarfs anything you can get from a solar panel.  An electrical system monitor is incredibly useful to figure out loads and where the load is going as well as charge rates.

        So if you're on a mooring or in a marina and don't want to plug in, fine.  But if you want to reduce your engine time, I'm afraid you are in for a disappointment.




        On Jul 16, 2013, at 12:19 PM, "William Kellett" <w.kellett@...> wrote:

         

        I am considering adding one or more solar panels to maintain my two batteries and reduce the need to run the engine ony for charging them.  I would like to see what other Sabre owners have done by way of selection electrical system design and panel location.  I do have a radar mast on my S28 and may attach some small panels to iot.

         

        Thanks,  Bill

      • Jan
        William, You do not say where you are sailing. What Jim says is probably right considering he is way up there on the globe. We on the other hand, cruise West
        Message 3 of 5 , Jul 17, 2013
          William,

          You do not say where you are sailing. What Jim says is probably right considering he is way up there on the globe. We on the other hand, cruise West Coast Mexico and have 460AH of 6-volt batteries for the house bank and 325 watts of panels located above the bimini of our S38 Mk I. We can be anchored for weeks (if it is sunny and bright- normal for that part of the world) and never start our engine and that is having two refrigerators running, one of which is an Engel.We have experienced a few rainy days and then the engine does get used.

          Different strokes for different folks.

          Jan S38 MkI Puerto Vallarta, Mex

          --- In Sabresailboat@yahoogroups.com, Jim Starkey <jim@...> wrote:
          >
          > Maintaining the batteries when the vessel is idle and reducing engine running time are quite distinct cases. Solar cells are very low output compared with either a typical load or alternator capacity. Generating current for most of the day for a week against no load at all is a significant about of current, but compared to a typical load for a boat in use it's next to noise.
          >
          > If you want to reduce engine time add (in order of priority) a smart voltage regulator then a higher capacity alternator. The net gain from either (let alone both) dwarfs anything you can get from a solar panel. An electrical system monitor is incredibly useful to figure out loads and where the load is going as well as charge rates.
          >
          > So if you're on a mooring or in a marina and don't want to plug in, fine. But if you want to reduce your engine time, I'm afraid you are in for a disappointment.
          >
          >
          >
          >
          > On Jul 16, 2013, at 12:19 PM, "William Kellett" <w.kellett@...> wrote:
          >
          > > I am considering adding one or more solar panels to maintain my two batteries and reduce the need to run the engine ony for charging them. I would like to see what other Sabre owners have done by way of selection electrical system design and panel location. I do have a radar mast on my S28 and may attach some small panels to iot.
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > > Thanks, Bill
          > >
          > >
          >
        • William Kellett
          I should have mentioned that my cruising area is coastal Maine during July and August. Good sun, high in the sky at mid day, mixed with a fair measure of FOG.
          Message 4 of 5 , Jul 18, 2013

            I should have mentioned that my cruising area is coastal Maine during July and August.  Good sun, high in the sky at mid day, mixed with a fair measure of FOG.

             

            From: Sabresailboat@yahoogroups.com [mailto:Sabresailboat@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Jan
            Sent: Wednesday, July 17, 2013 5:55 PM
            To: Sabresailboat@yahoogroups.com
            Subject: [SabreSailboat] Re: Solar Panel systems

             

             

            William,

            You do not say where you are sailing. What Jim says is probably right considering he is way up there on the globe. We on the other hand, cruise West Coast Mexico and have 460AH of 6-volt batteries for the house bank and 325 watts of panels located above the bimini of our S38 Mk I. We can be anchored for weeks (if it is sunny and bright- normal for that part of the world) and never start our engine and that is having two refrigerators running, one of which is an Engel.We have experienced a few rainy days and then the engine does get used.

            Different strokes for different folks.

            Jan S38 MkI Puerto Vallarta, Mex

            --- In Sabresailboat@yahoogroups.com, Jim Starkey <jim@...> wrote:
            >
            > Maintaining the batteries when the vessel is idle and reducing engine running time are quite distinct cases. Solar cells are very low output compared with either a typical load or alternator capacity. Generating current for most of the day for a week against no load at all is a significant about of current, but compared to a typical load for a boat in use it's next to noise.
            >
            > If you want to reduce engine time add (in order of priority) a smart voltage regulator then a higher capacity alternator. The net gain from either (let alone both) dwarfs anything you can get from a solar panel. An electrical system monitor is incredibly useful to figure out loads and where the load is going as well as charge rates.
            >
            > So if you're on a mooring or in a marina and don't want to plug in, fine. But if you want to reduce your engine time, I'm afraid you are in for a disappointment.
            >
            >
            >
            >
            > On Jul 16, 2013, at 12:19 PM, "William Kellett" <w.kellett@...> wrote:
            >
            > > I am considering adding one or more solar panels to maintain my two batteries and reduce the need to run the engine ony for charging them. I would like to see what other Sabre owners have done by way of selection electrical system design and panel location. I do have a radar mast on my S28 and may attach some small panels to iot.
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > > Thanks, Bill
            > >
            > >
            >

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