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fouled prop was surprisingly easy to clear

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  • JohnF
    Learned on our cruise this week - you may be able to untangle a fouled prop on a 34 MKII (offset prop) without putting your head under the water. I hung onto
    Message 1 of 7 , Jul 7 4:15 PM
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      Learned on our cruise this week - you may be able to untangle a fouled prop on a 34 MKII (offset prop) without putting your head under the water. I hung onto a line and just reached under the boat. The prop was right there within an arms reach, surprisingly close to the waterline.

      The diving mask that came with our boat was dry rotted and crumbled in my hand when I went to use it - lesson learned.

      As for how it got fouled, well, that is another story that starts with a glorious wing-on-wing run North on the Chesapeake and ends with a clumsy take down.
    • Dave Lochner
      Being able to reach the prop shaft without having to actually dive under the boat is an undocumented feature of a Sabre. Also, these devices are also handy,
      Message 2 of 7 , Jul 7 4:20 PM
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        Being able to reach the prop shaft without having to actually dive under the boat is an undocumented feature of a Sabre.

        Also, these devices are also handy, although I have no first hand experience (yet).  http://www.sailorssolutions.com/?page=ProductDetails&Item=CH01

        Dave


        On Jul 7, 2013, at 7:15 PM, JohnF wrote:

         

        Learned on our cruise this week - you may be able to untangle a fouled prop on a 34 MKII (offset prop) without putting your head under the water. I hung onto a line and just reached under the boat. The prop was right there within an arms reach, surprisingly close to the waterline.

        The diving mask that came with our boat was dry rotted and crumbled in my hand when I went to use it - lesson learned.

        As for how it got fouled, well, that is another story that starts with a glorious wing-on-wing run North on the Chesapeake and ends with a clumsy take down.


      • Bennett Kaufman
        Learned on our cruise this week - you may be able to untangle a fouled prop on a 34 MKII (offset prop) without putting your head under the water. I hung onto
        Message 3 of 7 , Jul 7 4:58 PM
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          Learned on our cruise this week - you may be able to untangle a fouled prop on a 34 MKII (offset prop) without putting your head under the water. I hung onto a line and just reached under the boat. The prop was right there within an arms reach, surprisingly close to the waterline. 

          Oh yeah, one of the advantages of an offset prop. Also have one on my '86 S36 (one of CW's 40 best production cruising boats!).  I have been able to (1) clean barnacles and crud off the prop and shaft; (2) remove lines fouled on the shaft; and  (3) even replace zincs, all without diving gear and not really needing to put my head underwater. But be sure to tie a lanyard on any tool you use, and fasten the other end to your wrist to keep it in your possession. 

          ben kaufman, CARACOL (S36 #52)
        • Bennett Kaufman
          Learned on our cruise this week - you may be able to untangle a fouled prop on a 34 MKII (offset prop) without putting your head under the water. I hung onto
          Message 4 of 7 , Jul 7 4:59 PM
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            Learned on our cruise this week - you may be able to untangle a fouled prop on a 34 MKII (offset prop) without putting your head under the water. I hung onto a line and just reached under the boat. The prop was right there within an arms reach, surprisingly close to the waterline. 

            Oh yeah, one of the advantages of an offset prop. Also have one on my '86 S36 (one of CW's 40 best production cruising boats!).  I have been ab le to (1) clean barnacles and crud off the prop and shaft; (2) remove lines fouled on the shaft; and (3) even replace zincs, all without diving gear and not really needing to put my head underwater. But be sure to tie a lanyard on any tool you use, and fasten the other end to your wrist to keep it in your possession. 

            ben kaufman, CARACOL (S36 #52)
          • Dan Trainor
            One I got a lobster line from a submerged pot wrap around prop. We were under sail and it slowly stopped the boat. chop was 1-2 ft, so not wanting to put my
            Message 5 of 7 , Jul 7 6:36 PM
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              One I got a lobster line from a submerged pot wrap around prop.  We were under sail and it slowly stopped the boat.  chop was 1-2  ft, so not wanting to put my head anywhere near the bouncing hull, I used my feet to unwrap the line - holding my hands against the hull to protect head.  Fortunately there was only 1 wrap and I could feel my way and it came loose.  Offset prop made this so much easier.  dan


              On Sun, Jul 7, 2013 at 7:59 PM, Bennett Kaufman <kaufmanb@...> wrote:
               

              Learned on our cruise this week - you may be able to untangle a fouled prop on a 34 MKII (offset prop) without putting your head under the water. I hung onto a line and just reached under the boat. The prop was right there within an arms reach, surprisingly close to the waterline. 

              Oh yeah, one of the advantages of an offset prop. Also have one on my '86 S36 (one of CW's 40 best production cruising boats!).  I have been ab le to (1) clean barnacles and crud off the prop and shaft; (2) remove lines fouled on the shaft; and (3) even replace zincs, all without diving gear and not really needing to put my head underwater. But be sure to tie a lanyard on any tool you use, and fasten the other end to your wrist to keep it in your possession. 

              ben kaufman, CARACOL (S36 #52)




              --
              Dan
            • Jan
              I don t recall sharing this story but two years ago, we were on passage motorsailing between Puerto Vallarta and La Paz in the Baja which is an open ocean 2.5
              Message 6 of 7 , Jul 7 7:57 PM
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                I don't recall sharing this story but two years ago, we were on passage motorsailing between Puerto Vallarta and La Paz in the Baja which is an open ocean 2.5 day passage. The admiral was on watch at 2:00 AM and in the moonlight saw something in the water dead ahead. Without time to react, we hit it and the engine came to a dead stop from 2200 rpm to 0 in one second! When I got to the cockpit there was a white veil streaming out behind the boat at least 30 feet. She had hit a bundle of visqueen probably thrown over board by druggies. It was plastic sheet with no drugs but similar in size to a drug bale. I had to go into the water, tied to the boat with mask, fins and rigging knife. Boy was I glad to have the offset prop!!!!! Two and a half hours later we were free. The admiral was able to hold a large flashlight which reflected on the white plastic so I could see what I was doing.

                Now for a teaching moment.

                -When we first got tangled, I stupidly started the engine in neutral then tried reverse to try to unwind it. Of course it immediately stalled. DONT DO THAT! I was lucky that I did not do damage to the transmission or shaft by that move.
                -We had two buddy boats with us at the time ahead of us but within sight. One boat saw us stop and radioed if we wanted them to come back. I did not want to hold them up with our difficulties but looking back, I should have asked them to come back and stand by while I was under the boat. I had considered that maybe waiting for daylight would be safer but then the wind comes up with the change in sea state so I elected to do it in the dark.

                It was not a good thing to have happen but the offset prop made it only half so bad!

                Jan S38 MkI "Capriccio", Puerto Vallarta, Mex.

                --- In Sabresailboat@yahoogroups.com, Dan Trainor <dptrainor@...> wrote:
                >
                > One I got a lobster line from a submerged pot wrap around prop. We were
                > under sail and it slowly stopped the boat. chop was 1-2 ft, so not
                > wanting to put my head anywhere near the bouncing hull, I used my feet to
                > unwrap the line - holding my hands against the hull to protect head.
                > Fortunately there was only 1 wrap and I could feel my way and it came
                > loose. Offset prop made this so much easier. dan
                >
                >
                > On Sun, Jul 7, 2013 at 7:59 PM, Bennett Kaufman <kaufmanb@...> wrote:
                >
                > > **
                > >
                > >
                > > Learned on our cruise this week - you may be able to untangle a fouled
                > > prop on a 34 MKII (offset prop) without putting your head under the water.
                > > I hung onto a line and just reached under the boat. The prop was right
                > > there within an arms reach, surprisingly close to the waterline.
                > >
                > > Oh yeah, one of the advantages of an offset prop. Also have one on my '86
                > > S36 (one of CW's 40 best production cruising boats!). I have been ab le
                > > to (1) clean barnacles and crud off the prop and shaft; (2) remove lines
                > > fouled on the shaft; and (3) even replace zincs, all without diving gear
                > > and not really needing to put my head underwater. But be sure to tie a
                > > lanyard on any tool you use, and fasten the other end to your wrist to keep
                > > it in your possession.
                > >
                > > ben kaufman, CARACOL (S36 #52)
                > >
                > >
                > >
                >
                >
                >
                > --
                > Dan
                >
              • Dave Evans
                We ve cleared the prop several times in Maine, stretched out across the dinghy. Even this jumble came clear without getting into the water:
                Message 7 of 7 , Jul 8 6:15 AM
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                  We've cleared the prop several times in Maine, stretched out across the dinghy. Even this jumble came clear without getting into the water: http://images.sailonset.com/DSCN0960x750.jpg

                  Of course, if the offset prop weren't so efficient at picking up lines, even under sail, this wouldn't be an issue!

                  The use-your-feet idea is interesting, but now that we have a ShaftShark, it might be touchy.

                  dge
                  34-II

                  On 7/7/2013 10:57 PM, Jan wrote:
                   



                  I don't recall sharing this story but two years ago, we were on passage motorsailing between Puerto Vallarta and La Paz in the Baja which is an open ocean 2.5 day passage. The admiral was on watch at 2:00 AM and in the moonlight saw something in the water dead ahead. Without time to react, we hit it and the engine came to a dead stop from 2200 rpm to 0 in one second! When I got to the cockpit there was a white veil streaming out behind the boat at least 30 feet. She had hit a bundle of visqueen probably thrown over board by druggies. It was plastic sheet with no drugs but similar in size to a drug bale. I had to go into the water, tied to the boat with mask, fins and rigging knife. Boy was I glad to have the offset prop!!!!! Two and a half hours later we were free. The admiral was able to hold a large flashlight which reflected on the white plastic so I could see what I was doing.

                  Now for a teaching moment.

                  -When we first got tangled, I stupidly started the engine in neutral then tried reverse to try to unwind it. Of course it immediately stalled. DONT DO THAT! I was lucky that I did not do damage to the transmission or shaft by that move.
                  -We had two buddy boats with us at the time ahead of us but within sight. One boat saw us stop and radioed if we wanted them to come back. I did not want to hold them up with our difficulties but looking back, I should have asked them to come back and stand by while I was under the boat. I had considered that maybe waiting for daylight would be safer but then the wind comes up with the change in sea state so I elected to do it in the dark.

                  It was not a good thing to have happen but the offset prop made it only half so bad!

                  Jan S38 MkI "Capriccio", Puerto Vallarta, Mex.

                  --- In Sabresailboat@yahoogroups.com, Dan Trainor <dptrainor@...> wrote:
                  >
                  > One I got a lobster line from a submerged pot wrap around prop. We were
                  > under sail and it slowly stopped the boat. chop was 1-2 ft, so not
                  > wanting to put my head anywhere near the bouncing hull, I used my feet to
                  > unwrap the line - holding my hands against the hull to protect head.
                  > Fortunately there was only 1 wrap and I could feel my way and it came
                  > loose. Offset prop made this so much easier. dan
                  >
                  >
                  > On Sun, Jul 7, 2013 at 7:59 PM, Bennett Kaufman <kaufmanb@...> wrote:
                  >
                  > > **
                  > >
                  > >
                  > > Learned on our cruise this week - you may be able to untangle a fouled
                  > > prop on a 34 MKII (offset prop) without putting your head under the water.
                  > > I hung onto a line and just reached under the boat. The prop was right
                  > > there within an arms reach, surprisingly close to the waterline.
                  > >
                  > > Oh yeah, one of the advantages of an offset prop. Also have one on my '86
                  > > S36 (one of CW's 40 best production cruising boats!). I have been ab le
                  > > to (1) clean barnacles and crud off the prop and shaft; (2) remove lines
                  > > fouled on the shaft; and (3) even replace zincs, all without diving gear
                  > > and not really needing to put my head underwater. But be sure to tie a
                  > > lanyard on any tool you use, and fasten the other end to your wrist to keep
                  > > it in your possession.
                  > >
                  > > ben kaufman, CARACOL (S36 #52)
                  > >
                  > >
                  > >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  > --
                  > Dan
                  >


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