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Re: [SabreSailboat] Martinis: was: Old Paint

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  • Bennett Kaufman
    However, when shaken the essential molecules are not only redistributed, but, and this is an important but, they are both oxygenated and bruised...   Gee, I
    Message 1 of 9 , May 6, 2013
      However, when shaken the essential molecules are not only redistributed, but, and this is an important but, they are both oxygenated and bruised...
       
      Gee, I guess I missed the lecture in college chemisty class in which the professor explained the process of "bruising" molecules...
       
      ben kaufman, CARACOL (S36 #52)
    • sabre32sailor
      Jim You must be part Brit. For they too like to limit the vermouth. In fact some refer to the drink as “Gin and it” when ordering one. Too bring this
      Message 2 of 9 , May 7, 2013
        Jim
         
        You must be part Brit.
        For they too like to limit the vermouth.
        In fact some refer to the drink as “Gin and it” when ordering one.
         
        Too bring this thread back to the original thread (you lads should know better..).
        3 years is money dust.
        We will be repainting the bottom of our RC boat tonight with 3-4 year old paint tonight.
         
        I used a 5+ year old quart of Micron last year on my keel with no issue.
         
        The only paint I have been warned about is 2 part polyurethane paints.
        Most likely bs if it never has been opened.
         
        john
         
         
        Sent from Windows Mail
         
        From: Jim Starkey
        Sent: ‎Monday‎, ‎May‎ ‎6‎, ‎2013 ‎9‎:‎32‎ ‎PM
        To: Sabresailboat@yahoogroups.com
         
         

        OK, I don't get it, never have gotten it.  Why did James Bond prefer Martinis shaken, not stirred.  That's ridiculous.
        (Disclosure:  I am a Le Carre, not Ian Flemming, fan).

        A Martini is a sublime cocktail named for the ingredient best left out.  Someone once explained that proper Martini was made with a bright light passed through the vermouth, but I am not convinced.  The less the vermouth, the better the Martini.  Old Raj is best, Boodles second, Plymouth third, Knockabout fourth, and Gordons for weekdays.  Tanqueray need not apply.

        I am well aware that this is a rum, not gin, list.  Still, can somebody explain what anyone, let alone a fictional spy with a cinematic franchise, would want a gin shaken, not stirred.

        And then there is the olive v. lemon peel question.  But perhaps I rant too far...
         

        On 5/6/2013 8:35 PM, Sid wrote:
         

        If you can, ask the dealer you bought it from if they could shake it up for you. I would think that after 3 years there is a pretty thick mass of copper at the bottom of the can, and you might have quite a time mixing it with just a stick. It is bad enough when you get a new can that has not been shaken (Like James Bond's martinis: "shaken, not stirred").

        Sid

        --- In Sabresailboat@yahoogroups.com, Dan Trainor <dptrainor@...> wrote:
        >
        > OK, I check with them. I would save $200+ if I can use it.
        >
        >
        > On Thu, May 2, 2013 at 7:49 AM, Richard Coerse <rcoerse@...>wrote:
        >
        > > **
        > >
        > >
        > > ** I would say that as long as it has not frozen and the can is still
        > > sealed it should be fine, but you may wish to contact the paint
        > > manufacturer for further assurance.
        > >
        > >
        > > Dan Trainor wrote:
        > >
        > >
        > > I have a gallon can of bottom paint that was stored for 3 years. Is it
        > > still good? Or does paint go bad?
        > >
        > > --
        > > Dan
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > >
        >
        >
        >
        > --
        > Dan
        >


         

      • Daniel Trainor
        I painted with the old paint. Not a problem. I think i will celebrate by having a martini tonight. Thanks guys. Sent from my iPhone ... I painted with the
        Message 3 of 9 , May 7, 2013
          I painted with the old paint.  Not a problem.   I think i will celebrate by having a martini tonight.   Thanks guys.

          Sent from my iPhone

          On May 7, 2013, at 7:00 AM, <sabre32sailor@...> wrote:

           

          Jim
           
          You must be part Brit.
          For they too like to limit the vermouth.
          In fact some refer to the drink as “Gin and it” when ordering one.
           
          Too bring this thread back to the original thread (you lads should know better..).
          3 years is money dust.
          We will be repainting the bottom of our RC boat tonight with 3-4 year old paint tonight.
           
          I used a 5+ year old quart of Micron last year on my keel with no issue.
           
          The only paint I have been warned about is 2 part polyurethane paints.
          Most likely bs if it never has been opened.
           
          john
           
           
          Sent from Windows Mail
           
          From: Jim Starkey
          Sent: ‎Monday‎, ‎May‎ ‎6‎, ‎2013 ‎9‎:‎32‎ ‎PM
          To: Sabresailboat@yahoogroups.com
           
           

          OK, I don't get it, never have gotten it.  Why did James Bond prefer Martinis shaken, not stirred.  That's ridiculous.
          (Disclosure:  I am a Le Carre, not Ian Flemming, fan).

          A Martini is a sublime cocktail named for the ingredient best left out.  Someone once explained that proper Martini was made with a bright light passed through the vermouth, but I am not convinced.  The less the vermouth, the better the Martini.  Old Raj is best, Boodles second, Plymouth third, Knockabout fourth, and Gordons for weekdays.  Tanqueray need not apply.

          I am well aware that this is a rum, not gin, list.  Still, can somebody explain what anyone, let alone a fictional spy with a cinematic franchise, would want a gin shaken, not stirred.

          And then there is the olive v. lemon peel question.  But perhaps I rant too far...
           

          On 5/6/2013 8:35 PM, Sid wrote:
           

          If you can, ask the dealer you bought it from if they could shake it up for you. I would think that after 3 years there is a pretty thick mass of copper at the bottom of the can, and you might have quite a time mixing it with just a stick. It is bad enough when you get a new can that has not been shaken (Like James Bond's martinis: "shaken, not stirred").

          Sid

          --- In Sabresailboat@yahoogroups.com, Dan Trainor <dptrainor@...> wrote:
          >
          > OK, I check with them. I would save $200+ if I can use it.
          >
          >
          > On Thu, May 2, 2013 at 7:49 AM, Richard Coerse <rcoerse@...>wrote:
          >
          > > **
          > >
          > >
          > > ** I would say that as long as it has not frozen and the can is still
          > > sealed it should be fine, but you may wish to contact the paint
          > > manufacturer for further assurance.
          > >
          > >
          > > Dan Trainor wrote:
          > >
          > >
          > > I have a gallon can of bottom paint that was stored for 3 years. Is it
          > > still good? Or does paint go bad?
          > >
          > > --
          > > Dan
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > >
          >
          >
          >
          > --
          > Dan
          >


           

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