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Re: [SabreSailboat] Stanchion and railing screws

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  • Peter Tollini
    Dave- You sail in fresh water. Fuhgeddabouddit! Pete
    Message 1 of 7 , Apr 1, 2013
      Dave-
      You sail in fresh water. Fuhgeddabouddit!
      Pete


      On Mon, Apr 1, 2013 at 5:58 PM, Dave Lochner <davelochner@...> wrote:
       

      Pete,


      There you go again, raising the bar. I was just going to use my old screws that are still sort of shiny and now you say for short money we can get shiny new 316SS screws.

      Dick,  I also had my stanchions refurbished. New welded ferrules and new SS ring tops. The price was about $23-24 a piece. Turnaround time was about 10 days last January. Not sure what it is now.

      Dave


      On Apr 1, 2013, at 4:56 PM, Peter Tollini wrote:

       

      Having just got my stanchions back from Whitewater (awesome job), I looked at the ziploc bag full of 10-24 x 3/8 screws that I had taken out. They were discolored and nasty looking, especially compared to the gleaming stainless I just got back.
      Fear not! McMaster has the same screws in 316 stainless for @ $8.00 for a bag of 50.
      The standard and WM and hardware store versions are 8-18 stainless, which is not 304 or 316.
      For you engineers, this is from Portland Bolt -
      In Type 316 stainless, the chromium content is lowered from 18% to 16%, however, the nickel content is raised to 10% and 2% molybdenum is added to the mixture. This change in the chromium/nickel ratio and the addition of the molybdenum increases the resistance to chlorides. This is why Type 316 stainless is often used in more corrosive environments where the material will be exposed to chemical, solvent, or salt water corrosion and makes it the preferred material for marine construction.

      In English, shiny screw heads.




    • Peter Tollini
      Dick - They did welded ferrules for the intermediates and did the tops with the new-style closed tops w/welded ferrules ( G on the Whitewater web site), then
      Message 2 of 7 , Apr 1, 2013
        Dick -
        They did welded ferrules for the intermediates and did the tops with the new-style closed tops w/welded ferrules ("G" on the Whitewater web site), then polished everything to the max. $20.25 per stanchion plus $18.00 to ship 8 stanchions back to MD. Total was $220. The stanchions would look fine on a brand new 426.
        Pete


        On Mon, Apr 1, 2013 at 5:26 PM, Richard Coerse <rcoerse@...> wrote:
         

        Peter,
        Did you hav new stainless eyes welded to the top of the stanchions and ferrules welded in for the lower lifelines in place of the nylon  inserts?  Do you mind telling me what the cost per stanchion was?
        Dick



        Peter Tollini wrote:
         
        Having just got my stanchions back from Whitewater (awesome job), I looked at the ziploc bag full of 10-24 x 3/8 screws that I had taken out. They were discolored and nasty looking, especially compared to the gleaming stainless I just got back.
        Fear not! McMaster has the same screws in 316 stainless for @ $8.00 for a bag of 50.
        The standard and WM and hardware store versions are 8-18 stainless, which is not 304 or 316.
        For you engineers, this is from Portland Bolt -
        In Type 316 stainless, the chromium content is lowered from 18% to 16%, however, the nickel content is raised to 10% and 2% molybdenum is added to the mixture. This change in the chromium/nickel ratio and the addition of the molybdenum increases the resistance to chlorides. This is why Type 316 stainless is often used in more corrosive environments where the material will be exposed to chemical, solvent, or salt water corrosion and makes it the preferred material for marine construction.

        In English, shiny screw heads.



      • Peter Tollini
        Dick - My bad - $25.25 per. The total was correct, though. Pete
        Message 3 of 7 , Apr 2, 2013
          Dick -
          My bad - $25.25 per. The total was correct, though.
          Pete


          On Mon, Apr 1, 2013 at 11:54 PM, Peter Tollini <pete@...> wrote:
          Dick -
          They did welded ferrules for the intermediates and did the tops with the new-style closed tops w/welded ferrules ("G" on the Whitewater web site), then polished everything to the max. $20.25 per stanchion plus $18.00 to ship 8 stanchions back to MD. Total was $220. The stanchions would look fine on a brand new 426.
          Pete


          On Mon, Apr 1, 2013 at 5:26 PM, Richard Coerse <rcoerse@...> wrote:
           

          Peter,
          Did you hav new stainless eyes welded to the top of the stanchions and ferrules welded in for the lower lifelines in place of the nylon  inserts?  Do you mind telling me what the cost per stanchion was?
          Dick



          Peter Tollini wrote:
           
          Having just got my stanchions back from Whitewater (awesome job), I looked at the ziploc bag full of 10-24 x 3/8 screws that I had taken out. They were discolored and nasty looking, especially compared to the gleaming stainless I just got back.
          Fear not! McMaster has the same screws in 316 stainless for @ $8.00 for a bag of 50.
          The standard and WM and hardware store versions are 8-18 stainless, which is not 304 or 316.
          For you engineers, this is from Portland Bolt -
          In Type 316 stainless, the chromium content is lowered from 18% to 16%, however, the nickel content is raised to 10% and 2% molybdenum is added to the mixture. This change in the chromium/nickel ratio and the addition of the molybdenum increases the resistance to chlorides. This is why Type 316 stainless is often used in more corrosive environments where the material will be exposed to chemical, solvent, or salt water corrosion and makes it the preferred material for marine construction.

          In English, shiny screw heads.




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