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Re: Getting tough in Annapolis

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  • marroigjose
    Yeah...that s the People s Republic of Maryland. I miss Virginia!
    Message 1 of 9 , Feb 8, 2013
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      Yeah...that's the People's Republic of Maryland. I miss Virginia!


      --- In Sabresailboat@yahoogroups.com, Peter Tollini wrote:
      >
      > baltimoresun.com Senate votes to ban drunken sailing
      >
      > By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun
      >
      > 12:07 PM EST, February 8, 2013
      > Advertisement
      > Krux('ns:centro', 'dataprovider.exelate');
      >
      > The Maryland Senate gave its answer to the old question of "what do you
      > with a drunken sailor" by voting to bring people who operate sailboats
      > while intoxicated under the same law as power boat operators.
      >
      > Senators voted 37-8 to add sail-only vessels to the list of watercraft it
      > is illegal to operate while under the influence of alcohol. The bill now
      > goes to the House of Delegates.
      >
      > The voted came after Sen. Richard F. Colburn, an Eastern Shore Republican,
      > quizzed floor leader Sen. James Brochin at length about the details of the
      > bill. Colburn asked which of the many persons who might make up a sailing
      > crew would be affected by the prohibition.
      >
      > Brochin, a Baltimore County Democrat, said the sailor legally defined as
      > the operator would be the person at the tiller. He said the bill had been
      > requested by the Department of Natural Resources after an intoxicated
      > sailor capsized in a storm and put first responders at risk. Brochin said
      > the bill would not affect the sailor who had one or two beers but only
      > those who meet the legal limit of .08 percent blood alcohol
      >
      > Colburn joined the opponents of the bill.
      >
      > "I don't really believe this bill is necessary. I think the Department of
      > Natural Resources officers have enough to handle," he said.
      >
      > Copyright © 2013, The Baltimore Sun
      >
    • Daniel Trainor
      This is just the beginning of the nanny state expansion of control. In boating as well as other activites. Sent from my iPhone ... This is just the beginning
      Message 2 of 9 , Feb 10, 2013
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        This is just the beginning of the nanny state expansion of control. In boating as well as other activites.  

        Sent from my iPhone

        On Feb 8, 2013, at 1:41 PM, Peter Tollini <pete@...> wrote:

         

        baltimoresun.com

        Senate votes to ban drunken sailing

        By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun

        12:07 PM EST, February 8, 2013

        Advertisement
        Krux('ns:centro', 'dataprovider.exelate');

        The Maryland Senate gave its answer to the old question of "what do you with a drunken sailor" by voting to bring people who operate sailboats while intoxicated under the same law as power boat operators.

        Senators voted 37-8 to add sail-only vessels to the list of watercraft it is illegal to operate while under the influence of alcohol. The bill now goes to the House of Delegates.

        The voted came after Sen. Richard F. Colburn, an Eastern Shore Republican, quizzed floor leader Sen. James Brochin at length about the details of the bill. Colburn asked which of the many persons who might make up a sailing crew would be affected by the prohibition.

        Brochin, a Baltimore County Democrat, said the sailor legally defined as the operator would be the person at the tiller.  He said the bill had been requested by the Department of Natural Resources after an intoxicated sailor capsized in a storm and put first responders at risk. Brochin said the bill would not affect the sailor who had one or two beers but only those who meet the legal limit of .08 percent blood alcohol

        Colburn joined the opponents of the bill.

        "I don't really believe this bill is necessary. I think the Department of Natural Resources officers have enough to handle," he said.

        Copyright © 2013, The Baltimore Sun

      • Peter Tollini
        Dan - What chafes me is the duplication, overlap and waste of public resources. It s already a Federal Class A misdemeanor ($5K fine) to operate a vessel while
        Message 3 of 9 , Feb 10, 2013
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          Dan -
          What chafes me is the duplication, overlap and waste of public resources. It's already a Federal Class A misdemeanor ($5K fine) to operate a vessel while intoxicated (drugs or alcohol).  Although that only applies to navigable waters, and not landlocked lakes,it pretty well handles the issue. "Vessel" covers everything from dinghies to Panamax container ships. (No definitive ruling yet on inflatable companions). So, the only value added from MD's proposal is the ability to arrest the idiot who heads out on the lake on a Sunfish while drunk.  Darwin will do a better job with him in a far more cost effective way.
          Here's a question -  a drunken sailor leaves the pub and heads out toward his mooring in a 10' inflatable w/o lights.  Halfway out, he stops to releive himself into a bucket which he then dumps over the side. He mistakenly chokes the warm outboard to restart it, floods the carb and gas spills into the water.
          How much could he owe Uncle Sam?
          Pete


          On Sun, Feb 10, 2013 at 12:16 PM, Daniel Trainor <dptrainor@...> wrote:
           

          This is just the beginning of the nanny state expansion of control. In boating as well as other activites.  

          Sent from my iPhone

          On Feb 8, 2013, at 1:41 PM, Peter Tollini <pete@...> wrote:

           

          baltimoresun.com

          Senate votes to ban drunken sailing

          By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun

          12:07 PM EST, February 8, 2013

          Advertisement
          Krux('ns:centro', 'dataprovider.exelate');

          The Maryland Senate gave its answer to the old question of "what do you with a drunken sailor" by voting to bring people who operate sailboats while intoxicated under the same law as power boat operators.

          Senators voted 37-8 to add sail-only vessels to the list of watercraft it is illegal to operate while under the influence of alcohol. The bill now goes to the House of Delegates.

          The voted came after Sen. Richard F. Colburn, an Eastern Shore Republican, quizzed floor leader Sen. James Brochin at length about the details of the bill. Colburn asked which of the many persons who might make up a sailing crew would be affected by the prohibition.

          Brochin, a Baltimore County Democrat, said the sailor legally defined as the operator would be the person at the tiller.  He said the bill had been requested by the Department of Natural Resources after an intoxicated sailor capsized in a storm and put first responders at risk. Brochin said the bill would not affect the sailor who had one or two beers but only those who meet the legal limit of .08 percent blood alcohol

          Colburn joined the opponents of the bill.

          "I don't really believe this bill is necessary. I think the Department of Natural Resources officers have enough to handle," he said.

          Copyright © 2013, The Baltimore Sun


        • Peter Tollini
          I just had to check. Sen. Brochin, who introduced the bill, represents a landlocked district. No further comment. Pete ... I just had to check. Sen. Brochin,
          Message 4 of 9 , Feb 10, 2013
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            I just had to check. Sen. Brochin, who introduced the bill, represents a landlocked district.  No further comment.
            Pete


            On Sun, Feb 10, 2013 at 12:52 PM, Peter Tollini <pete@...> wrote:
            Dan -
            What chafes me is the duplication, overlap and waste of public resources. It's already a Federal Class A misdemeanor ($5K fine) to operate a vessel while intoxicated (drugs or alcohol).  Although that only applies to navigable waters, and not landlocked lakes,it pretty well handles the issue. "Vessel" covers everything from dinghies to Panamax container ships. (No definitive ruling yet on inflatable companions). So, the only value added from MD's proposal is the ability to arrest the idiot who heads out on the lake on a Sunfish while drunk.  Darwin will do a better job with him in a far more cost effective way.
            Here's a question -  a drunken sailor leaves the pub and heads out toward his mooring in a 10' inflatable w/o lights.  Halfway out, he stops to releive himself into a bucket which he then dumps over the side. He mistakenly chokes the warm outboard to restart it, floods the carb and gas spills into the water.
            How much could he owe Uncle Sam?
            Pete


            On Sun, Feb 10, 2013 at 12:16 PM, Daniel Trainor <dptrainor@...> wrote:
             

            This is just the beginning of the nanny state expansion of control. In boating as well as other activites.  

            Sent from my iPhone

            On Feb 8, 2013, at 1:41 PM, Peter Tollini <pete@...> wrote:

             

            baltimoresun.com

            Senate votes to ban drunken sailing

            By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun

            12:07 PM EST, February 8, 2013

            Advertisement
            Krux('ns:centro', 'dataprovider.exelate');

            The Maryland Senate gave its answer to the old question of "what do you with a drunken sailor" by voting to bring people who operate sailboats while intoxicated under the same law as power boat operators.

            Senators voted 37-8 to add sail-only vessels to the list of watercraft it is illegal to operate while under the influence of alcohol. The bill now goes to the House of Delegates.

            The voted came after Sen. Richard F. Colburn, an Eastern Shore Republican, quizzed floor leader Sen. James Brochin at length about the details of the bill. Colburn asked which of the many persons who might make up a sailing crew would be affected by the prohibition.

            Brochin, a Baltimore County Democrat, said the sailor legally defined as the operator would be the person at the tiller.  He said the bill had been requested by the Department of Natural Resources after an intoxicated sailor capsized in a storm and put first responders at risk. Brochin said the bill would not affect the sailor who had one or two beers but only those who meet the legal limit of .08 percent blood alcohol

            Colburn joined the opponents of the bill.

            "I don't really believe this bill is necessary. I think the Department of Natural Resources officers have enough to handle," he said.

            Copyright © 2013, The Baltimore Sun



          • Bruce Heyman
            Pete, The answer depends on the expiration date of the flares... Bruce Bruce Heyman (949) 289-8400 ... Pete, The answer depends on the expiration date of the
            Message 5 of 9 , Feb 10, 2013
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              Pete,
              The answer depends on the expiration date of the flares...
              Bruce

              Bruce Heyman
              (949) 289-8400


              Peter Tollini <pete@...> wrote:

               

              Dan -
              What chafes me is the duplication, overlap and waste of public resources. It's already a Federal Class A misdemeanor ($5K fine) to operate a vessel while intoxicated (drugs or alcohol).  Although that only applies to navigable waters, and not landlocked lakes,it pretty well handles the issue. "Vessel" covers everything from dinghies to Panamax container ships. (No definitive ruling yet on inflatable companions). So, the only value added from MD's proposal is the ability to arrest the idiot who heads out on the lake on a Sunfish while drunk.  Darwin will do a better job with him in a far more cost effective way.
              Here's a question -  a drunken sailor leaves the pub and heads out toward his mooring in a 10' inflatable w/o lights.  Halfway out, he stops to releive himself into a bucket which he then dumps over the side. He mistakenly chokes the warm outboard to restart it, floods the carb and gas spills into the water.
              How much could he owe Uncle Sam?
              Pete


              On Sun, Feb 10, 2013 at 12:16 PM, Daniel Trainor <dptrainor@...> wrote:
               

              This is just the beginning of the nanny state expansion of control. In boating as well as other activites.  

              Sent from my iPhone

              On Feb 8, 2013, at 1:41 PM, Peter Tollini <pete@...> wrote:

               

              baltimoresun.com

              Senate votes to ban drunken sailing

              By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun

              12:07 PM EST, February 8, 2013

              Advertisement
              Krux('ns:centro', 'dataprovider.exelate');

              The Maryland Senate gave its answer to the old question of "what do you with a drunken sailor" by voting to bring people who operate sailboats while intoxicated under the same law as power boat operators.

              Senators voted 37-8 to add sail-only vessels to the list of watercraft it is illegal to operate while under the influence of alcohol. The bill now goes to the House of Delegates.

              The voted came after Sen. Richard F. Colburn, an Eastern Shore Republican, quizzed floor leader Sen. James Brochin at length about the details of the bill. Colburn asked which of the many persons who might make up a sailing crew would be affected by the prohibition.

              Brochin, a Baltimore County Democrat, said the sailor legally defined as the operator would be the person at the tiller.  He said the bill had been requested by the Department of Natural Resources after an intoxicated sailor capsized in a storm and put first responders at risk. Brochin said the bill would not affect the sailor who had one or two beers but only those who meet the legal limit of .08 percent blood alcohol

              Colburn joined the opponents of the bill.

              "I don't really believe this bill is necessary. I think the Department of Natural Resources officers have enough to handle," he said.

              Copyright © 2013, The Baltimore Sun


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