Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Re: [SabreSailboat] sailing mags

Expand Messages
  • Jim Starkey
    Anyone ever heard of a sailing magazine boat of the year that wasn t from an advertiser? There are a number of huge differences between flying magazines
    Message 1 of 14 , Jan 3, 2013
    View Source
    • 0 Attachment
      Anyone ever heard of a sailing magazine "boat of the year" that wasn't from an advertiser?

      There are a number of huge differences between flying magazines ("Flying", AOPA "Pilot") and boating magazines.  The flying magazines recognize that there are danger airplanes, engines with design and manufacturing defects, and unreliable avionics.  Both magazines also analyze a fatal accident each everything month.  When pressed on why they regularly report bad news, they say, "Because we trying to keep our readership alive."

      There are no bad boats, no bad boat electronics, and no rotten mast steps in sailing magazines.  Boats almost never sink, masts don't break, and engines don't implode.

      But, if you think the glossy sailing mags are rotten, check out scuba magazines.  They get paid so much by the resorts they don't need advertising.
       
      On 1/3/2013 12:39 PM, Dave Lochner wrote:
       

      Jim,


      You forgot to mention the ads for charter companies cleverly disguised as feature articles.

      Sail does have the "I was stupid and survived" article each month. Material to make the even novice sailors shake their heads in wonderment. The latest one involved sailing on Lake Ontario.

      Dave



      On Jan 3, 2013, at 12:13 PM, Jim Starkey wrote:

       

      "Yaahting", the famous -- and outrageously funny -- parody pretty much said it all.  Boating magazines are advertising vehicles that exist to sell gaudy play toys to the newly rich with enough "nauty" articles to hold the attention of those not quite there yet.  From the opening ad "Light up your life in a Bedouin 46" to the article "How to Walk Down a Dock", it captures the essential of where almost every boating magazine will eventually go.  And nothing has changed except nouveau riche are even richer (right, Larry?).

      "Sail" was once the antidote to "Yachting".  The "Cruising World" was an authentic version of "Sail".  Now "Cruising World" has ads for 8 50+ foot "cruising boats" in the first 10 or 12 pages.  Their target audience appears to be hedge fund managers looking for an entry level 52 footer that can sail around the world or, more realistically, launder hedge fund profits as a business expense for entertaining clients.

      Sad, very sad.  But the fact that Yachting, Sail, and Cruising World are all free to the demographically correct should be a tip off.

      "Sailing", which I haven't actually seen in a decade or so, used to actually cover sailing and had terrific design reviews by Robert Perry.  I Googled it, it still exists, and looks as good as ever.  Doesn't particularly cover cruising, but then, what does?

      And there's always Practical Sailor.

      On 1/3/13 11:41 AM, rcarter2234 wrote:
       

      while the popcorn is out:

      which sailing magazines are worthwhile? I used to enjoy Sail, but now only the Calder bits. I seem to have been put on the "sucker-for-sail-magazines" list, and have received flyers for Cruising World (freebee had some fun sea stories about places I'll never go, but nothing of depth) and Practical Sailor.

      Suggestions for something that is more than adds and candy?

      (for downeast types, already onboard MBHH)

      thanks

      Bob
      Andiamo S38





    • mookiesurfs@gmail.com
      CW features a pompous hypocrite, if that sort of thing entertains you. Sent from an elegant interface with limited functionality, while traveling
      Message 2 of 14 , Jan 3, 2013
      View Source
      • 0 Attachment
        CW features a pompous hypocrite, if that sort of thing entertains you.

        Sent from an elegant interface with limited functionality, while traveling 

        On Jan 3, 2013, at 1:55 PM, Jim Starkey <jim@...> wrote:

         

        Anyone ever heard of a sailing magazine "boat of the year" that wasn't from an advertiser?

        There are a number of huge differences between flying magazines ("Flying", AOPA "Pilot") and boating magazines.  The flying magazines recognize that there are danger airplanes, engines with design and manufacturing defects, and unreliable avionics.  Both magazines also analyze a fatal accident each everything month.  When pressed on why they regularly report bad news, they say, "Because we trying to keep our readership alive."

        There are no bad boats, no bad boat electronics, and no rotten mast steps in sailing magazines.  Boats almost never sink, masts don't break, and engines don't implode.

        But, if you think the glossy sailing mags are rotten, check out scuba magazines.  They get paid so much by the resorts they don't need advertising.
         
        On 1/3/2013 12:39 PM, Dave Lochner wrote:
         

        Jim,


        You forgot to mention the ads for charter companies cleverly disguised as feature articles.

        Sail does have the "I was stupid and survived" article each month. Material to make the even novice sailors shake their heads in wonderment. The latest one involved sailing on Lake Ontario.

        Dave



        On Jan 3, 2013, at 12:13 PM, Jim Starkey wrote:

         

        "Yaahting", the famous -- and outrageously funny -- parody pretty much said it all.  Boating magazines are advertising vehicles that exist to sell gaudy play toys to the newly rich with enough "nauty" articles to hold the attention of those not quite there yet.  From the opening ad "Light up your life in a Bedouin 46" to the article "How to Walk Down a Dock", it captures the essential of where almost every boating magazine will eventually go.  And nothing has changed except nouveau riche are even richer (right, Larry?).

        "Sail" was once the antidote to "Yachting".  The "Cruising World" was an authentic version of "Sail".  Now "Cruising World" has ads for 8 50+ foot "cruising boats" in the first 10 or 12 pages.  Their target audience appears to be hedge fund managers looking for an entry level 52 footer that can sail around the world or, more realistically, launder hedge fund profits as a business expense for entertaining clients.

        Sad, very sad.  But the fact that Yachting, Sail, and Cruising World are all free to the demographically correct should be a tip off.

        "Sailing", which I haven't actually seen in a decade or so, used to actually cover sailing and had terrific design reviews by Robert Perry.  I Googled it, it still exists, and looks as good as ever.  Doesn't particularly cover cruising, but then, what does?

        And there's always Practical Sailor.

        On 1/3/13 11:41 AM, rcarter2234 wrote:
         

        while the popcorn is out:

        which sailing magazines are worthwhile? I used to enjoy Sail, but now only the Calder bits. I seem to have been put on the "sucker-for-sail-magazines" list, and have received flyers for Cruising World (freebee had some fun sea stories about places I'll never go, but nothing of depth) and Practical Sailor.

        Suggestions for something that is more than adds and candy?

        (for downeast types, already onboard MBHH)

        thanks

        Bob
        Andiamo S38





      • Scott
        Although not strictly a sailing magazine, most sailors from New England are familiar with Points East. It is a great (and free) regional magazine. They also
        Message 3 of 14 , Jan 3, 2013
        View Source
        • 0 Attachment
          Although not strictly a sailing magazine, most sailors from New England are familiar with Points East. It is a great (and free) regional magazine. They also have a website where you can read full issues. (www.pointseast.com) Nice plus is that the advertising is targeted towards our general demographics, not "to sell gaudy play toys " as Jim so apptly points out.
           
          Scott

          From: rcarter2234 <rhc112@...>
          To: Sabresailboat@yahoogroups.com
          Sent: Thursday, January 3, 2013 11:41 AM
          Subject: [SabreSailboat] sailing mags
           
          while the popcorn is out:

          which sailing magazines are worthwhile? I used to enjoy Sail, but now only the Calder bits. I seem to have been put on the "sucker-for-sail-magazines" list, and have received flyers for Cruising World (freebee had some fun sea stories about places I'll never go, but nothing of depth) and Practical Sailor.

          Suggestions for something that is more than adds and candy?

          (for downeast types, already onboard MBHH)

          thanks

          Bob
          Andiamo S38

        • John Zeratsky
          Hi all, this is my first post here. My favorites are: - Practical Sailor — for reasons mentioned - Latitude 38 — local focus, real stories, bad news, great
          Message 4 of 14 , Jan 3, 2013
          View Source
          • 0 Attachment
            Hi all, this is my first post here.

            My favorites are:

            - Practical Sailor — for reasons mentioned
            - Latitude 38 — local focus, real stories, bad news, great letters
            - Wooden Boat — just for fun (I don't have a wooden boat)

            JZ

            Aegea
            Sabre 38mkII
            Sausalito, CA


            On Thu, Jan 3, 2013 at 11:19 AM, Scott <targa387@...> wrote:
             

            Although not strictly a sailing magazine, most sailors from New England are familiar with Points East. It is a great (and free) regional magazine. They also have a website where you can read full issues. (www.pointseast.com) Nice plus is that the advertising is targeted towards our general demographics, not "to sell gaudy play toys " as Jim so apptly points out.
             
            Scott

            From: rcarter2234 <rhc112@...>
            To: Sabresailboat@yahoogroups.com
            Sent: Thursday, January 3, 2013 11:41 AM
            Subject: [SabreSailboat] sailing mags
             
            while the popcorn is out:

            which sailing magazines are worthwhile? I used to enjoy Sail, but now only the Calder bits. I seem to have been put on the "sucker-for-sail-magazines" list, and have received flyers for Cruising World (freebee had some fun sea stories about places I'll never go, but nothing of depth) and Practical Sailor.

            Suggestions for something that is more than adds and candy?

            (for downeast types, already onboard MBHH)

            thanks

            Bob
            Andiamo S38


          • Jim Starkey
            Or Wooden Boat to celebrate not owning one. I love, admire, and cherish wooden boats. I honor my friends who keep them going. But my desire to own a
            Message 5 of 14 , Jan 3, 2013
            View Source
            • 0 Attachment
              Or "Wooden Boat" to celebrate not owning one.

              I love, admire, and cherish wooden boats.  I honor my friends who keep them going.  But my desire to own a biodegradable vessel is so, so limited as to asymptotically approach zero.

              That said, I've just been informed that "Miss February" of the Seven Seas Calendar is a beautifully maintained Concordia sitting in Somesville Harbor with its owners (staff?), my wife, and myself in the cockpit.  And I wasn't even drinking rum!  (Gordon's on the rocks with a twist, if I remember correctly.)


              On 1/3/13 5:43 PM, John Zeratsky wrote:
               
              Hi all, this is my first post here.

              My favorites are:

              - Practical Sailor — for reasons mentioned
              - Latitude 38 — local focus, real stories, bad news, great letters
              - Wooden Boat — just for fun (I don't have a wooden boat)

              JZ

              Aegea
              Sabre 38mkII
              Sausalito, CA


              On Thu, Jan 3, 2013 at 11:19 AM, Scott <targa387@...> wrote:
               
              Although not strictly a sailing magazine, most sailors from New England are familiar with Points East. It is a great (and free) regional magazine. They also have a website where you can read full issues. (www.pointseast.com) Nice plus is that the advertising is targeted towards our general demographics, not "to sell gaudy play toys " as Jim so apptly points out.
               
              Scott

              From: rcarter2234 <rhc112@...>
              To: Sabresailboat@yahoogroups.com
              Sent: Thursday, January 3, 2013 11:41 AM
              Subject: [SabreSailboat] sailing mags
               
              while the popcorn is out:

              which sailing magazines are worthwhile? I used to enjoy Sail, but now only the Calder bits. I seem to have been put on the "sucker-for-sail-magazines" list, and have received flyers for Cruising World (freebee had some fun sea stories about places I'll never go, but nothing of depth) and Practical Sailor.

              Suggestions for something that is more than adds and candy?

              (for downeast types, already onboard MBHH)

              thanks

              Bob
              Andiamo S38



            • sailor11767
              ... Pat Goss -- that is one name that makes me see red! Pat has his place of business here in the DC area. The Admiral took her car to him for years before I
              Message 6 of 14 , Jan 3, 2013
              View Source
              • 0 Attachment
                >But like listening to Pat Goss on AutoWeek, the articles are nice, but >for those in the know, there are holes or outright non-truths for >every subject covered that become a turn off after a while.

                Pat Goss -- that is one name that makes me see red! Pat has his place of business here in the DC area. The Admiral took her car to him for years before I met her. One day shortly after we met, she dropped her car off with him for the day. They looked at her rear brakes and said they needed replacement, but couldn't do the job before she was scheduled to pick up the car, so they told to reschedule. I told her to cancel it and buy the parts for me to do the job. Well, I opened up the rear brakes and when I showed her the difference between the new brakes and the "needing replacement" brakes with 90% of the lining remaining -- well, that was the end of nearly 20 years of business with Pat!

                Problem is that, when you deal with a "professional," you can get thoroughly screwed and still have a great impression of the fellow. If they had been able to do the job that day, she'd have never known that they were ripping her off!

                Pat may be technically knowledgeable. He may personally be of the highest ethical standards. But his company -- well, that's another story...

                Harry
              Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.