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Re: Jib Sheets

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  • sailor11767
    Two good knots that allow either end to pull on the loop are the figure 8 loop (I ve never used it, but climbers seem to swear by it) and the alpine butterfly
    Message 1 of 17 , Dec 5, 2012
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      Two good knots that allow either end to pull on the loop are the figure 8 loop (I've never used it, but climbers seem to swear by it) and the alpine butterfly (which is easier to tie if you aren't tying it around something!).

      http://www.animatedknots.com/alpinebutterfly/index.php?Categ=climbing&LogoImage=LogoGrog.jpg&Website=www.animatedknots.com

      Neither approach is much smaller with regard to the knot than a bowline, but both use less line, weigh less, and don't have ends laying about.

      Harry



      --- In Sabresailboat@yahoogroups.com, Dave Lochner <davelochner@...> wrote:
      >
      > I've used this method for a number of years, without any problems, including a couple times that I really screwed up a tack and had the sail flog for far too long.
      >
      > One way to limit slippage might be to put a seizing line around the two tails of the sheet where it exits the loop. Sewing them together might help. It wouldn't take too long and would be easy to cut way if the sail needed to come down.
      >
      > Dave
      >
      >
      > On Dec 4, 2012, at 10:56 PM, David Laino wrote:
      >
      > >
      > > Dave,
      > >
      > > I tried this method of jibsheet attachment several years back in a new line on a previous boat. Then one day while out in heavy winds (and likely some bad tacks that flogged the jib) I discovered I had a port jibsheet nearly twice as long as the starboard - the knot had slipped. I was left wondering, there must be a more secure knot to use in this configuration. I didn't know what knot that was so I ended up cutting the line into two separate sheets and tying bowlines in each.
      > >
      > > If anyone has a better knot for this jibsheet arrangement I would like to know what that is since it otherwise seems a promising approach for lightening the sheet knots for light air.
      > >
      > > David
      > > 38 MKII
      > >
      > > On Dec 4, 2012, at 7:43 PM, Dave Lochner <davelochner@...> wrote:
      > >
      > >> Rich,
      > >>
      > >> I'll try. It is much easier to show a photo, but I don't have one.
      > >>
      > >> Double the line to find the mid point, sort of like this: ===) Take the midpoint and push it through the clew. Then take the ends and pull them through the bight formed by the line going through the clew. Pull the lines tight, one end goes to port, one to starboard.
      > >>
      > >> Here's a bad picture using a piece of cord and a pair of scissors. Should give you the idea.
      > >>
      > >> <Photo on 12-4-12 at 7.34 PM #2.jpg>
      > >>
      > >> It saves weight because you only use a few inches of line, whereas, each bowline tied as small as you can still uses about a foot of line. That extra weight in light air will weigh the clew down.
      > >>
      > >> Dave
      > >>
      > >>
      > >> On Dec 4, 2012, at 7:14 PM, sailaway0608 wrote:
      > >>
      > >>>
      > >>> Dave,
      > >>>
      > >>> Could you expand on this for me. Are you saying one length running from one side of the boat, thru the clew, and then to the other side???
      > >>>
      > >>> I frequently suffer from the "knot in the shrouds" or KITS, especially on light air days.
      > >>>
      > >>> "Finally, especially if he has roller furling, get one long length rather than 2 short lengths. With one long length the sheet can be looped through the jib clew reducing weight on the clew and eliminating the knot that tends to hang up on shrouds when tacking."
      > >>>
      > >>> Rich
      > >>> 1986 Sabre 36
      > >>> Lake Champlain, VT
      > >>>
      > >>
      > >
      > >
      >
    • Chas
      I use the single line and cowhitch method, and far from sllipping, it takes several minutes with a marlinspike each fall to undo the lin! Charlie 1979
      Message 2 of 17 , Dec 5, 2012
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        I use the single line and cowhitch method, and far from sllipping, it takes several minutes with a marlinspike each fall to undo the lin! Charlie 1979 S34MkI #62 Pajama Girl.

        --- In Sabresailboat@yahoogroups.com, David Laino <djlaino@...> wrote:
        >
        > All good advice, Dave and Sid.  Like all things, it is a trade-off.  The splice seems best to solve "KITS" but presents the most time-consuming means of attaching and detaching the sheets.  I like Dave's suggestion of seizing the line.  It seems a fair trade-off between reduced "KITS" and additional work in attaching and detaching sheets.  I'll consider it next time jibsheets need replacing.
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        > ________________________________
        > From: Sid <xawdisney@...>
        > To: Sabresailboat@yahoogroups.com
        > Sent: Wednesday, December 5, 2012 8:04 AM
        > Subject: [SabreSailboat] Re: Jib Sheets
        >
        >
        >  
        >
        >
        > The best way to minimize "KITS" is to use 2 lines, and splice them instead of tying them, so there is no knot to catch in the shrouds. I have never done that, but have just used the single line cow hitch method Dave described, and lived with the clew getting snagged during the tacks. The small nub of line that sticks out from the cow hitch is not as bad as the the tails of a bowline, but it still catches.
        >
        > Several years I tried running the sheets through the clew and securing them with an overhand knot to avoid the snagging, but that failed miserably as the knot shifted uncontrollably.
        >
        > On occasion while racing, if I have sufficient crew, I will have someone stand in front of the mast during tacks to fend off the clew during the tacks so it doesn't get snagged. Otherwise, we just try to time the release during a tack so that the clew flies smartly across the boat during the tacks. But that is not always successful, and there is much flailing about.
        >
        > Sid Wax
        > Passing Fancy
        > S28-II #319
        >
      • avatar30hawaii
        Aloha, At this site:http://sailing.about.com/od/equipmentgear/ss/softshacklehowto.htmyou can learn how to put a soft schackle on your jib sheets. It works
        Message 3 of 17 , Dec 6, 2012
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          Aloha,
          At this site:http://sailing.about.com/od/equipmentgear/ss/softshacklehowto.htmyou can learn how to put a soft schackle on your jib sheets. It works great.

          Duke

          --- In Sabresailboat@yahoogroups.com, "Chas" <chodgmanjr@...> wrote:
          >
          > I use the single line and cowhitch method, and far from sllipping, it takes several minutes with a marlinspike each fall to undo the lin! Charlie 1979 S34MkI #62 Pajama Girl.
          >
          > --- In Sabresailboat@yahoogroups.com, David Laino <djlaino@> wrote:
          > >
          > > All good advice, Dave and Sid.  Like all things, it is a trade-off.  The splice seems best to solve "KITS" but presents the most time-consuming means of attaching and detaching the sheets.  I like Dave's suggestion of seizing the line.  It seems a fair trade-off between reduced "KITS" and additional work in attaching and detaching sheets.  I'll consider it next time jibsheets need replacing.
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > > ________________________________
          > > From: Sid <xawdisney@>
          > > To: Sabresailboat@yahoogroups.com
          > > Sent: Wednesday, December 5, 2012 8:04 AM
          > > Subject: [SabreSailboat] Re: Jib Sheets
          > >
          > >
          > >  
          > >
          > >
          > > The best way to minimize "KITS" is to use 2 lines, and splice them instead of tying them, so there is no knot to catch in the shrouds. I have never done that, but have just used the single line cow hitch method Dave described, and lived with the clew getting snagged during the tacks. The small nub of line that sticks out from the cow hitch is not as bad as the the tails of a bowline, but it still catches.
          > >
          > > Several years I tried running the sheets through the clew and securing them with an overhand knot to avoid the snagging, but that failed miserably as the knot shifted uncontrollably.
          > >
          > > On occasion while racing, if I have sufficient crew, I will have someone stand in front of the mast during tacks to fend off the clew during the tacks so it doesn't get snagged. Otherwise, we just try to time the release during a tack so that the clew flies smartly across the boat during the tacks. But that is not always successful, and there is much flailing about.
          > >
          > > Sid Wax
          > > Passing Fancy
          > > S28-II #319
          > >
          >
        • Charles Sidwa
          If both the port and starboard jib sheets get loaded won t the whipping just get torn out? If that is not an issue I really like it. Charlie ... From:
          Message 4 of 17 , Dec 6, 2012
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            If both the port and starboard jib sheets get loaded won't the whipping just get torn out?  If that is not an issue I really like it.
             
            Charlie
             
             
            ----- Original Message -----
            Sent: Thursday, December 06, 2012 1:40 PM
            Subject: [SabreSailboat] Re: Jib Sheets

             

            Aloha,
            At this site:http://sailing.about.com/od/equipmentgear/ss/softshacklehowto.htmyou can learn how to put a soft schackle on your jib sheets. It works great.

            Duke

            --- In Sabresailboat@yahoogroups.com, "Chas" <chodgmanjr@...> wrote:
            >
            > I use the single line and cowhitch method, and far from sllipping, it takes several minutes with a marlinspike each fall to undo the lin! Charlie 1979 S34MkI #62 Pajama Girl.
            >
            > --- In Sabresailboat@yahoogroups.com, David Laino <djlaino@> wrote:
            > >
            > > All good advice, Dave and Sid.  Like all things, it is a trade-off.  The splice seems best to solve "KITS" but presents the most time-consuming means of attaching and detaching the sheets.  I like Dave's suggestion of seizing the line.  It seems a fair trade-off between reduced "KITS" and additional work in attaching and detaching sheets.  I'll consider it next time jibsheets need replacing.
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > > ________________________________
            > > From: Sid <xawdisney@>
            > > To: Sabresailboat@yahoogroups.com
            > > Sent: Wednesday, December 5, 2012 8:04 AM
            > > Subject: [SabreSailboat] Re: Jib Sheets
            > >
            > >
            > >  
            > >
            > >
            > > The best way to minimize "KITS" is to use 2 lines, and splice them instead of tying them, so there is no knot to catch in the shrouds. I have never done that, but have just used the single line cow hitch method Dave described, and lived with the clew getting snagged during the tacks. The small nub of line that sticks out from the cow hitch is not as bad as the the tails of a bowline, but it still catches.
            > >
            > > Several years I tried running the sheets through the clew and securing them with an overhand knot to avoid the snagging, but that failed miserably as the knot shifted uncontrollably.
            > >
            > > On occasion while racing, if I have sufficient crew, I will have someone stand in front of the mast during tacks to fend off the clew during the tacks so it doesn't get snagged. Otherwise, we just try to time the release during a tack so that the clew flies smartly across the boat during the tacks. But that is not always successful, and there is much flailing about.
            > >
            > > Sid Wax
            > > Passing Fancy
            > > S28-II #319
            > >
            >

          • Richard Coerse
            I have used the soft shackle to attach jib sheets for several years now and it really works well. Dick Coerse Early Light 1982 Sabre 34 MK I #160 Solomons,
            Message 5 of 17 , Dec 6, 2012
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              I have used the "soft shackle" to attach jib sheets for several years now and it really works well.


              Dick Coerse
              "Early Light"
              1982 Sabre 34 MK I #160
              Solomons, MD



              avatar30hawaii wrote:
               

              Aloha,
              At this site:http://sailing.about.com/od/equipmentgear/ss/softshacklehowto.htmyou can learn how to put a soft schackle on your jib sheets. It works great.

              Duke

              --- In Sabresailboat@yahoogroups.com, "Chas" <chodgmanjr@...> wrote:
              >
              > I use the single line and cowhitch method, and far from sllipping, it takes several minutes with a marlinspike each fall to undo the lin! Charlie 1979 S34MkI #62 Pajama Girl.
              >
              > --- In Sabresailboat@yahoogroups.com, David Laino <djlaino@> wrote:
              > >
              > > All good advice, Dave and Sid.  Like all things, it is a trade-off.  The splice seems best to solve "KITS" but presents the most time-consuming means of attaching and detaching the sheets.  I like Dave's suggestion of seizing the line.  It seems a fair trade-off between reduced "KITS" and additional work in attaching and detaching sheets.  I'll consider it next time jibsheets need replacing.
              > >
              > >
              > >
              > >
              > >
              > >
              > > ________________________________
              > > From: Sid <xawdisney@>
              > > To: Sabresailboat@yahoogroups.com
              > > Sent: Wednesday, December 5, 2012 8:04 AM
              > > Subject: [SabreSailboat] Re: Jib Sheets
              > >
              > >
              > >  
              > >
              > >
              > > The best way to minimize "KITS" is to use 2 lines, and splice them instead of tying them, so there is no knot to catch in the shrouds. I have never done that, but have just used the single line cow hitch method Dave described, and lived with the clew getting snagged during the tacks. The small nub of line that sticks out from the cow hitch is not as bad as the the tails of a bowline, but it still catches.
              > >
              > > Several years I tried running the sheets through the clew and securing them with an overhand knot to avoid the snagging, but that failed miserably as the knot shifted uncontrollably.
              > >
              > > On occasion while racing, if I have sufficient crew, I will have someone stand in front of the mast during tacks to fend off the clew during the tacks so it doesn't get snagged. Otherwise, we just try to time the release during a tack so that the clew flies smartly across the boat during the tacks. But that is not always successful, and there is much flailing about.
              > >
              > > Sid Wax
              > > Passing Fancy
              > > S28-II #319
              > >
              >


            • Dan Trainor
              I use the single line cow hitch method also. Once it is tighten, i have found it doesn t slip. A Marlin spike required to undo. ... -- Dan I use the single
              Message 6 of 17 , Dec 6, 2012
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                I use the single line cow hitch method also.  Once it is tighten, i have found it doesn't slip.  A Marlin spike required to undo.


                On Thu, Dec 6, 2012 at 2:29 PM, Richard Coerse <rcoerse@...> wrote:
                I have used the "soft shackle" to attach jib sheets for several years now and it really works well.


                Dick Coerse
                "Early Light"
                1982 Sabre 34 MK I #160
                Solomons, MD



                avatar30hawaii wrote:
                 

                Aloha,
                At this site:http://sailing.about.com/od/equipmentgear/ss/softshacklehowto.htmyou can learn how to put a soft schackle on your jib sheets. It works great.

                Duke

                --- In Sabresailboat@yahoogroups.com, "Chas" <chodgmanjr@...> wrote:
                >
                > I use the single line and cowhitch method, and far from sllipping, it takes several minutes with a marlinspike each fall to undo the lin! Charlie 1979 S34MkI #62 Pajama Girl.
                >
                > --- In Sabresailboat@yahoogroups.com, David Laino <djlaino@> wrote:
                > >
                > > All good advice, Dave and Sid.  Like all things, it is a trade-off.  The splice seems best to solve "KITS" but presents the most time-consuming means of attaching and detaching the sheets.  I like Dave's suggestion of seizing the line.  It seems a fair trade-off between reduced "KITS" and additional work in attaching and detaching sheets.  I'll consider it next time jibsheets need replacing.
                > >
                > >
                > >
                > >
                > >
                > >
                > > ________________________________
                > > From: Sid <xawdisney@>
                > > To: Sabresailboat@yahoogroups.com
                > > Sent: Wednesday, December 5, 2012 8:04 AM
                > > Subject: [SabreSailboat] Re: Jib Sheets
                > >
                > >
                > >  
                > >
                > >
                > > The best way to minimize "KITS" is to use 2 lines, and splice them instead of tying them, so there is no knot to catch in the shrouds. I have never done that, but have just used the single line cow hitch method Dave described, and lived with the clew getting snagged during the tacks. The small nub of line that sticks out from the cow hitch is not as bad as the the tails of a bowline, but it still catches.
                > >
                > > Several years I tried running the sheets through the clew and securing them with an overhand knot to avoid the snagging, but that failed miserably as the knot shifted uncontrollably.
                > >
                > > On occasion while racing, if I have sufficient crew, I will have someone stand in front of the mast during tacks to fend off the clew during the tacks so it doesn't get snagged. Otherwise, we just try to time the release during a tack so that the clew flies smartly across the boat during the tacks. But that is not always successful, and there is much flailing about.
                > >
                > > Sid Wax
                > > Passing Fancy
                > > S28-II #319
                > >
                >





                --
                Dan

              • Sid
                That looks cool, but I m a bit confused. Dick. It seems that with two sheets attached, you would have 4 lines running thru the clew (two doubled loops), which
                Message 7 of 17 , Dec 8, 2012
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                  That looks cool, but I'm a bit confused. Dick. It seems that with two sheets attached, you would have 4 lines running thru the clew (two doubled loops), which either means a huge clew grommet, or very light sheets.

                  Also, it is not clear how this method avoids KITS.

                  Sid


                  --- In Sabresailboat@yahoogroups.com, Richard Coerse <rcoerse@...> wrote:
                  >
                  > I have used the "soft shackle" to attach jib sheets for several years
                  > now and it really works well.
                  >
                  >
                  > Dick Coerse
                  > "Early Light"
                  > 1982 Sabre 34 MK I #160
                  > Solomons, MD
                  >
                  >
                  > avatar30hawaii wrote:
                  > >
                  > >
                  > > Aloha,
                  > > At this
                  > > site:http://sailing.about.com/od/equipmentgear/ss/softshacklehowto.htmyou
                  > > can learn how to put a soft schackle on your jib sheets. It works great.
                  > >
                  > > Duke
                  > >
                  > > --- In Sabresailboat@yahoogroups.com
                  > > <mailto:Sabresailboat%40yahoogroups.com>, "Chas" <chodgmanjr@> wrote:
                  > > >
                  > > > I use the single line and cowhitch method, and far from sllipping,
                  > > it takes several minutes with a marlinspike each fall to undo the lin!
                  > > Charlie 1979 S34MkI #62 Pajama Girl.
                  > > >
                  > > > --- In Sabresailboat@yahoogroups.com
                  > > <mailto:Sabresailboat%40yahoogroups.com>, David Laino <djlaino@> wrote:
                  > > > >
                  > > > > All good advice, Dave and Sid. Like all things, it is a
                  > > trade-off. The splice seems best to solve "KITS" but presents the
                  > > most time-consuming means of attaching and detaching the sheets. I
                  > > like Dave's suggestion of seizing the line. It seems a fair
                  > > trade-off between reduced "KITS" and additional work in attaching and
                  > > detaching sheets. I'll consider it next time jibsheets need replacing.
                  > > > >
                  > > > >
                  > > > >
                  > > > >
                  > > > >
                  > > > >
                  > > > > ________________________________
                  > > > > From: Sid <xawdisney@>
                  > > > > To: Sabresailboat@yahoogroups.com
                  > > <mailto:Sabresailboat%40yahoogroups.com>
                  > > > > Sent: Wednesday, December 5, 2012 8:04 AM
                  > > > > Subject: [SabreSailboat] Re: Jib Sheets
                  > > > >
                  > > > >
                  > > > > Â
                  > > > >
                  > > > >
                  > > > > The best way to minimize "KITS" is to use 2 lines, and splice them
                  > > instead of tying them, so there is no knot to catch in the shrouds. I
                  > > have never done that, but have just used the single line cow hitch
                  > > method Dave described, and lived with the clew getting snagged during
                  > > the tacks. The small nub of line that sticks out from the cow hitch is
                  > > not as bad as the the tails of a bowline, but it still catches.
                  > > > >
                  > > > > Several years I tried running the sheets through the clew and
                  > > securing them with an overhand knot to avoid the snagging, but that
                  > > failed miserably as the knot shifted uncontrollably.
                  > > > >
                  > > > > On occasion while racing, if I have sufficient crew, I will have
                  > > someone stand in front of the mast during tacks to fend off the clew
                  > > during the tacks so it doesn't get snagged. Otherwise, we just try to
                  > > time the release during a tack so that the clew flies smartly across
                  > > the boat during the tacks. But that is not always successful, and
                  > > there is much flailing about.
                  > > > >
                  > > > > Sid Wax
                  > > > > Passing Fancy
                  > > > > S28-II #319
                  > > > >
                  > > >
                  > >
                  > >
                  >
                • Richard Coerse
                  Sid, The port and starboard sheets are all one piece if line. ... Sid, The port and starboard sheets are all one piece if line. Sid wrote: That looks cool, but
                  Message 8 of 17 , Dec 8, 2012
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                    Sid,

                    The port and starboard sheets are all one piece if line.

                    Sid wrote:
                     



                    That looks cool, but I'm a bit confused. Dick. It seems that with two sheets attached, you would have 4 lines running thru the clew (two doubled loops), which either means a huge clew grommet, or very light sheets.

                    Also, it is not clear how this method avoids KITS.

                    Sid

                    --- In Sabresailboat@yahoogroups.com, Richard Coerse <rcoerse@...> wrote:
                    >
                    > I have used the "soft shackle" to attach jib sheets for several years
                    > now and it really works well.
                    >
                    >
                    > Dick Coerse
                    > "Early Light"
                    > 1982 Sabre 34 MK I #160
                    > Solomons, MD
                    >
                    >
                    > avatar30hawaii wrote:
                    > >
                    > >
                    > > Aloha,
                    > > At this
                    > > site:http://sailing.about.com/od/equipmentgear/ss/softshacklehowto.htmyou
                    > > can learn how to put a soft schackle on your jib sheets. It works great.
                    > >
                    > > Duke
                    > >
                    > > --- In Sabresailboat@yahoogroups.com
                    > > <mailto:Sabresailboat%40yahoogroups.com>, "Chas" <chodgmanjr@> wrote:
                    > > >
                    > > > I use the single line and cowhitch method, and far from sllipping,
                    > > it takes several minutes with a marlinspike each fall to undo the lin!
                    > > Charlie 1979 S34MkI #62 Pajama Girl.
                    > > >
                    > > > --- In Sabresailboat@yahoogroups.com
                    > > <mailto:Sabresailboat%40yahoogroups.com>, David Laino <djlaino@> wrote:
                    > > > >
                    > > > > All good advice, Dave and Sid. Like all things, it is a
                    > > trade-off. The splice seems best to solve "KITS" but presents the
                    > > most time-consuming means of attaching and detaching the sheets. I
                    > > like Dave's suggestion of seizing the line. It seems a fair
                    > > trade-off between reduced "KITS" and additional work in attaching and
                    > > detaching sheets. I'll consider it next time jibsheets need replacing.
                    > > > >
                    > > > >
                    > > > >
                    > > > >
                    > > > >
                    > > > >
                    > > > > ________________________________
                    > > > > From: Sid <xawdisney@>
                    > > > > To: Sabresailboat@yahoogroups.com
                    > > <mailto:Sabresailboat%40yahoogroups.com>
                    > > > > Sent: Wednesday, December 5, 2012 8:04 AM
                    > > > > Subject: [SabreSailboat] Re: Jib Sheets
                    > > > >
                    > > > >
                    > > > > Â
                    > > > >
                    > > > >
                    > > > > The best way to minimize "KITS" is to use 2 lines, and splice them
                    > > instead of tying them, so there is no knot to catch in the shrouds. I
                    > > have never done that, but have just used the single line cow hitch
                    > > method Dave described, and lived with the clew getting snagged during
                    > > the tacks. The small nub of line that sticks out from the cow hitch is
                    > > not as bad as the the tails of a bowline, but it still catches.
                    > > > >
                    > > > > Several years I tried running the sheets through the clew and
                    > > securing them with an overhand knot to avoid the snagging, but that
                    > > failed miserably as the knot shifted uncontrollably.
                    > > > >
                    > > > > On occasion while racing, if I have sufficient crew, I will have
                    > > someone stand in front of the mast during tacks to fend off the clew
                    > > during the tacks so it doesn't get snagged. Otherwise, we just try to
                    > > time the release during a tack so that the clew flies smartly across
                    > > the boat during the tacks. But that is not always successful, and
                    > > there is much flailing about.
                    > > > >
                    > > > > Sid Wax
                    > > > > Passing Fancy
                    > > > > S28-II #319
                    > > > >
                    > > >
                    > >
                    > >
                    >


                  • Jack
                    Thanks Dave. Yes, it is fun trying to figure this out. I have an MC Scow. That s easy! Appreciate the response! Jack
                    Message 9 of 17 , Dec 10, 2012
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                      Thanks Dave. Yes, it is fun trying to figure this out. I have an MC Scow. That's easy!

                      Appreciate the response!

                      Jack

                      --- In Sabresailboat@yahoogroups.com, Dave Lochner <davelochner@...> wrote:
                      >
                      > Jack,
                      >
                      > Rule of thumb, each jib sheet needs to be 1.5 times the length of the boat. So a 30 foot boat would need 45 ft sheets. The dimension isn't absolutely critical, if you had 44 feet that would work too. However, your father can always shorten a line, but they are hell to lengthen.
                      >
                      > Line diameter is a trade off between strength, cost, and handling ease. For boats in the 28-38 foot range I think most of us are using 7/16" line, it is fat enough to be easy on the hand, small enough to run through the blocks, and light enough so that in lighter air the weight of the line will not adversely affect sail shape too much.
                      >
                      > You'll get a variety of opinions on which type of line to use. Sta-set and Regatta braid are popular choices. Some boats use red and green lines, red for the port jib sheet, green for the starboard jib sheet. You can also color coordinate the lines to the boat.
                      >
                      > Finally, especially if he has roller furling, get one long length rather than 2 short lengths. With one long length the sheet can be looped through the jib clew reducing weight on the clew and eliminating the knot that tends to hang up on shrouds when tacking.
                      >
                      > Defender usually has the best prices.
                      >
                      > And you thought this was going to be simple. :)
                      >
                      > Dave
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      > On Dec 3, 2012, at 5:55 PM, Jack wrote:
                      >
                      > > Hello, my father has a MK1 and he has asked for new jib sheets for Christmas. I was wondering if anyone knows a length and width.
                      > >
                      > >
                      >
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