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Re: [SabreSailboat] Re: Recommendation sought for awlgripping the hull - greater Boston area

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  • Dave Lochner
    Joe, Yes, if the yard is good at matching colors or if they buy factory color gelcoat. Even if the color is off a little if the entire hull is done you won t
    Message 1 of 44 , Feb 2, 2012
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      Joe,

      Yes, if the yard is good at matching colors or if they buy factory color gelcoat. Even if the color is off a little if the entire hull is done you won't notice it. When my boat was done the white was a good match, the blue boot stripe was a bit bluer, but I think he tried to match the new cove stripe tape. I actually like the color better.

      There is a quality to a gel coat finish (even a 30 year old finish) that I like. When compared to paint jobs, the color seems to have more luster and depth, personal preferences.

      Dave


      On Feb 2, 2012, at 11:02 AM, mjkassoc@... wrote:

       

      Thanks, John. A couple of additional considerations:
       
      Durability
      When I sold my 15-year old S34MkII (new when I purchased),  the white hull still looked close enough to new to me. Same on my current 362 after 10 years. I am hopeful that this thread will prove academic.
       
      Appearance
      Will an "after-market" gelcoat job by a competent yard look reasonably close to new?
       
       Joe Kosheff
      S362-261 Fogs End

      -----Original Message-----
      From: john kalinowski <sabre32sailor@...>
      To: Sabresailboat <Sabresailboat@yahoogroups.com>
      Sent: Thu, Feb 2, 2012 10:35 am
      Subject: Re: [SabreSailboat] Re: Recommendation sought for awlgripping the hull - greater Boston area

       
      Joe
       
      Gelcoat is like thick latex.  You need to spray it if doing large areas.  You can catilize it and roll it on, but you will have trouble getting the thickness correct.  When done, you have to put a UVA release agent on, as gelcoat will not dry in the contact with air. basically a liquid wax (think thinned turtle wax liquid which will do the job in a pinch).
      When done, you sand the hull if you have orange peel.  If you sprayed and took your time, you just remove the UVA with some soapy water. 
       
      Both need prep work. The Awlgrip needs a perfect surface it you really want it to glow.
      Gelcoat is not as demanding, but anywhere you have stress cracks, you need to dig them out and fix first, else it will crack at the same place.
       
      Surface prep for gelcoat is to rough the surface with sandpaper.  Awlgrip needs finer grit sanding and then a primer tie coat if you expect it to stay on.
       
      Less color selections for Gelcoat, but you can mix what you like, then add catalyst.
       
      If a shop that  is set up for paint and gelcoat, gelcoat is likely easier since the prep work is less.
      For the DYI, a roll/tip of a 2 part urathane is easier than gelcoat.
      I suggest spraying of awlgrip is left to the pros. One good whiff can kill you when the paint epoxies your lungs..
       
      Regards
       
       john
      --- On Thu, 2/2/12, mjkassoc@... <mjkassoc@...> wrote:

      From: mjkassoc@... <mjkassoc@...>
      Subject: Re: [SabreSailboat] Re: Recommendation sought for awlgripping the hull - greater Boston area
      To: Sabresailboat@yahoogroups.com
      Date: Thursday, February 2, 2012, 10:05 AM

       
      Early in this thread someone mentioned re-doing gelcoat as an alternative to painting. I'd never heard of this before. What are the considerations of one vs the other?
       
      Joe Kosheff
      S362-261 Fogs End


      -----Original Message-----
      From: Jim Starkey <jstarkey@...>
      To: Sabresailboat <Sabresailboat@yahoogroups.com>
      Sent: Wed, Feb 1, 2012 1:18 pm
      Subject: Re: [SabreSailboat] Re: Recommendation sought for awlgripping the hull - greater Boston area

       
      Having been through this a couple of time, a few observations.   The primary one is that the prep labor is where the cost is, not the materials.  Anyone could quote a $1000 per boat for spraying a coat of Awlgrip.  It would look like crap and peel off after a few seasons.  Any paint job worth paying for is going to be expensive, period.  Even a minimal job requires a high build primer and labor intensive fairing.  There are no short cuts except to use illegal labor and illegal environmental practices.

      Imron is softer than Awlgrip and easier to repair.  Awlgrip is harder than Imron and less likely to need repair.  Awlgrip is formulated specifically for boats.  Imron is formulated for airplanes and trucks, though now airplanes generally use other stuff.

      Imron and Awlgrip use incompatible primers.  My father in law used a guy who used Awlgrip primer for an Imron paint job.  Five years later, the primer reverted to crude oil and the Imron blistered.  Don't do it.  Don't even think about it.

      Painting a boat outside is the height of folly.  What is the point of risking a $6K+ paint job if a bug flies into the paint?   And more to the point, what is the point of risking a $6K+ paint job to a guy willing to take that stupid risk?  I don't like bugs in my code, though it does provide job security.  Bugs in a really expensive paint job is something else quite different.

      On 2/1/2012 1:01 PM, marblehead2011 wrote:
       
      Thanks for the recommendation. I'm guessing that the $150/ft doesn't include prep work. Do you recall how much that cost in addition to the painting cost?

      thanks, Bob

      --- In Sabresailboat@yahoogroups.com, Jay Heihsel <heihjay@...> wrote:
      >
      > Hi
      >
      > Custom Fiberglass out hingham repainted our s34 about six years ago and still looks great! We went with dark green - it was a new color at the time.
      >
      > Cost - it was about $150 a foot
      >
      > Best
      > Jay
      >
      > Sent from my iPhone
      >
      > On Jan 31, 2012, at 12:31 PM, "marblehead2011" <rryan14@...> wrote:
      >
      > > We are thinking about painting our hull dark blue/black on our 85 Sabre 36. The gelcoat isn't bad, but there are a couple of deep scratches that I don't think will come out without re-gelcoating a large section of the portside hull (the hull color is gray rather than white).
      > >
      > > My questions to this forum:
      > >
      > > 1. In the greater Boston area (the boat is in Marblehead), can any recommend a reputable company for painting?
      > >
      > > 2. If you have done this in the past, approximately how much did it cost you?
      > >
      > > 3. From your experience, would you recommend Awlgrip or other paints like Imron?
      > >
      > > There's a guy in Rockland, ME (Peter Johanson) that has an excellent reputation and facility - just far away. Maybe that is the route to go for the following winter season?
      > >
      > > Thanks as always,
      > >
      > > Bob
      > >
      > >
      >



      -- 
      Jim Starkey
      Founder and CTO
      NuoDB, Inc.


    • marblehead2011
      I appreciate all the input that this post has generated. Here s where I am so far: Intellectually, I agree that gelcoating makes more sense than an awlgripped
      Message 44 of 44 , Feb 5, 2012
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        I appreciate all the input that this post has generated. Here's where I am so far:

        Intellectually, I agree that gelcoating makes more sense than an awlgripped paint job - but I co-own my boat with a guy who absolutely lusts after any boat that is awlgripped navy/black (flag blue, I surmise). So, we might as well do that.

        We had a bunch of work done at Johanson's in Rockland Maine when we first bought the boat - a great yard with a painting shed. But, the added cost of getting the boat up there plus their hauling costs (they aren't on the water), makes this more expensive than the Boston area places (a surprise to me).

        So, I'll see about getting some ballpark estimates at:

        Dennis Doucette - Ipswich
        Custom Fiberglass - Hingham
        Dions - Salem
        Marblehead Trading - Marblehead
        Shaw's - Deighton
        Simms Bros. - Marshfield

        I'll avoid Onset and maybe Marblehead Trading from past experience. This is a great list to start with and a testament to value of this list group.

        I am wondering if the time to get the boat painting is in the summer versus the offseason?

        Again, thank you to all who responded.

        Bob





        --- In Sabresailboat@yahoogroups.com, "marblehead2011" <rryan14@...> wrote:
        >
        > We are thinking about painting our hull dark blue/black on our 85 Sabre 36. The gelcoat isn't bad, but there are a couple of deep scratches that I don't think will come out without re-gelcoating a large section of the portside hull (the hull color is gray rather than white).
        >
        > My questions to this forum:
        >
        > 1. In the greater Boston area (the boat is in Marblehead), can any recommend a reputable company for painting?
        >
        > 2. If you have done this in the past, approximately how much did it cost you?
        >
        > 3. From your experience, would you recommend Awlgrip or other paints like Imron?
        >
        > There's a guy in Rockland, ME (Peter Johanson) that has an excellent reputation and facility - just far away. Maybe that is the route to go for the following winter season?
        >
        > Thanks as always,
        >
        > Bob
        >
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