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Re: snipping and sliding

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  • Mike
    I do a lot of short handed (2 people) and single handed long distance racing and a cutter or ability to ditch the rig as part of the safety requirements. A
    Message 1 of 3 , Jun 2, 2011
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      I do a lot of short handed (2 people) and single handed long distance racing and a cutter or ability to ditch the rig as part of the safety requirements. A bolt cutter to cut the rod on a 402 has to be large and therefore heavy just think of maneuvering on a deck at night in high seas with the rig down an a 25 lb 3 foot long cutter. Difficult. I think your arm might give out before you cut through all the rigging on a 402 with a hacksaw also how many blades do you have, with the wild motion and the rig bouncing around you will probably break a few blades. With either of these think about how your crew would do if you can't help. Unless they are big strong guys its unlikely that they could cut the rig my wife could hardly pick up the cutter I originally had. I find that a battery powered grinder with a cutter blade is a better option. Its small easy to use by anyone, quick but it has to be kept charged. The other approach is not to cut the rig but cut the split pins with a small bolt cutter or a cold chisel and hammer and then drive out the cotter pins at the deck with a hammer and screwdriver. I tried this in a shore test and it was much easier than any of the other hand methods.

      Hopefully you never have to put any of these method to the test. Regards, Mike



      --- In Sabresailboat@yahoogroups.com, "npsands@..." <npsands@...> wrote:
      >
      > Thanks to everyone who helped with their advice on rig tuning for our S402 a couple weeks back.
      >
      > Wanted to get some feedback on what people carry on board to cut the rig away in the event of it coming down ... what size bolt-cutters would be best for -17 rod? So far I've put my (untested of course) faith in a hacksaw, but it makes me think I'd like something quicker.
      >
      > cheers
      >
      > Nick
      >
    • walkabout193
      Nick It s not easy or quick to cut rod rigging and hand actuated hydraulic cutters are very expensive. A better strategy IMHO is to pull the cotter pins on the
      Message 2 of 3 , Jun 2, 2011
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        Nick
        It's not easy or quick to cut rod rigging and hand actuated hydraulic cutters are very expensive. A better strategy IMHO is to pull the cotter pins on the standing rigging and dump the whole rig overboard. I use Dashew's approach to the cotter pins and cut them short w/ just enough splay to prevent accidental loss but allow for easy removal in a time of an emergency rig collapse. Plan to cut the mast free with a hacksaw if it hasn't completely broken of its own accord.
        With rod rigging you should forget about bolt cutters, they'll never make it.
        APS or someone has some online video of timed cutting through rod rigging with a hacksaw, part of the sales pitch for the hydraulic cutter...it was enough to persuade me a hacksaw to be a pointless exercise in reallife conditions at sea.
        Len Bertaux


        --- In Sabresailboat@yahoogroups.com, "npsands@..." <npsands@...> wrote:
        >
        > Thanks to everyone who helped with their advice on rig tuning for our S402 a couple weeks back.
        >
        > Wanted to get some feedback on what people carry on board to cut the rig away in the event of it coming down ... what size bolt-cutters would be best for -17 rod? So far I've put my (untested of course) faith in a hacksaw, but it makes me think I'd like something quicker.
        >
        > cheers
        >
        > Nick
        >
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