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Re: [SabreSailboat] Re: Two discoveries & 1 idea

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  • Peter Tollini
    That is a great discovery. Do they make another one for when the existing hole is too big? :) Pete
    Message 1 of 7 , Apr 2, 2011
      That is a great discovery.  Do they make another one for when the existing hole is too big? :)
      Pete

      On Fri, Apr 1, 2011 at 7:36 PM, jamesfrankel <jlf-oohay.com@faa.com> wrote:
       

      As it turns out, there is the perfect tool to enlarge a hole made with a hole saw. The Starrett "Oops" Arbor, Cat. No. A19 (see http://amzn.com/B002KF5GIY). Basically, you nest the smaller hole saw inside the larger hole saw. The Oops Arbor sets the smaller hole saw so that it sticks out further, thus acting as a guide for the larger hole saw. Depending on the thread size of the hole saws, you may need an adapter, Cat. No. A12 (see http://www.starrett.com/download/189_pta_hole_saw_arbors.pdf).

      Jamie
      S/V Sea Quester, Sabre 362 #265
      Marblehead, MA



      --- In Sabresailboat@yahoogroups.com, Peter Tollini <pete@...> wrote:
      >
      > 1) I had to enlarge a hole for a through hull from 3/4" to 1". Hole saws
      > don't like to start with the pilot bit anchored in air.The admiral (wisely)
      > refuses to hold anything that I am drilling from the other side. I took a
      > scrap piece of 1 1/2" clost pole about 2' long and cit a 3/8" shoulder back
      > the thickness of the hull. The Admiral was comfortable pressing a two foot
      > stick into the hole. From the outside, I had a stable anchor for the pilot
      > and got a neat hole without the hole saw skittering on the gelcoat.
      >
      > 2) If you like tonic drinks (G&T, V&T or Mt.G.&T), you've probably noticed
      > that even the name brand tonics have degenerated into syrupy soft
      > drinks. Fever Tree Tonic from the UK and, sold at Whole Foods is back to
      > basics, I discovered it last week. Wow! Real quinine,cane suger and
      > carbonated spring water. With your favorite spirit, you'll feel like you
      > need a linen suit and a pith helmet.
      >
      > 3) Idea. I subscribe to Fine Homebuilding, and one of their suggestions for
      > tracking down pesky water leaks in houses was infrared photography. I'm
      > going to give that a try the next time I can't figure out where that drip is
      > coming from.
      >
      > Pete
      >


    • Martin
      Lacking a compliant Admiral, one can 5 minute epoxy a peice of scrap wood on the inside of the hole to be enlarged. Drill into that scrap to center the hole
      Message 2 of 7 , Apr 2, 2011
        Lacking a compliant Admiral, one can 5 minute epoxy a peice of scrap wood on the inside of the hole to be enlarged. Drill into that scrap to center the hole saw. Works.

        Cheers,
        Martin

        --- In Sabresailboat@yahoogroups.com, "jamesfrankel" <jlf-oohay.com@...> wrote:
        >
        > As it turns out, there is the perfect tool to enlarge a hole made with a hole saw. The Starrett "Oops" Arbor, Cat. No. A19 (see http://amzn.com/B002KF5GIY). Basically, you nest the smaller hole saw inside the larger hole saw. The Oops Arbor sets the smaller hole saw so that it sticks out further, thus acting as a guide for the larger hole saw. Depending on the thread size of the hole saws, you may need an adapter, Cat. No. A12 (see http://www.starrett.com/download/189_pta_hole_saw_arbors.pdf).
        >
        > Jamie
        > S/V Sea Quester, Sabre 362 #265
        > Marblehead, MA
        >
        > --- In Sabresailboat@yahoogroups.com, Peter Tollini <pete@> wrote:
        > >
        > > 1) I had to enlarge a hole for a through hull from 3/4" to 1". Hole saws
        > > don't like to start with the pilot bit anchored in air.The admiral (wisely)
        > > refuses to hold anything that I am drilling from the other side. I took a
        > > scrap piece of 1 1/2" clost pole about 2' long and cit a 3/8" shoulder back
        > > the thickness of the hull. The Admiral was comfortable pressing a two foot
        > > stick into the hole. From the outside, I had a stable anchor for the pilot
        > > and got a neat hole without the hole saw skittering on the gelcoat.
        > >
        > > 2) If you like tonic drinks (G&T, V&T or Mt.G.&T), you've probably noticed
        > > that even the name brand tonics have degenerated into syrupy soft
        > > drinks. Fever Tree Tonic from the UK and, sold at Whole Foods is back to
        > > basics, I discovered it last week. Wow! Real quinine,cane suger and
        > > carbonated spring water. With your favorite spirit, you'll feel like you
        > > need a linen suit and a pith helmet.
        > >
        > > 3) Idea. I subscribe to Fine Homebuilding, and one of their suggestions for
        > > tracking down pesky water leaks in houses was infrared photography. I'm
        > > going to give that a try the next time I can't figure out where that drip is
        > > coming from.
        > >
        > > Pete
        > >
        >
      • badwrench99
        As far as drilling a larger hole using a hole saw when you have a hole too big for a guide drill already present (an idea I used just this past weekend to
        Message 3 of 7 , Apr 3, 2011
          As far as drilling a larger hole using a hole saw when you have a hole too big for a guide drill already present (an idea I used just this past weekend to enlarge a 1-inch hole to a 1-1/2 inch hole):

          I got a 1/2-inch thick piece of scrap wood that was somewhat wider than the hole I was trying to drill, and cut a hole out of the center of it using the larger hole saw I needed. I then centered the piece of wood with its hole concentric with the existing hole, and held the wood in place with duct tape. The wood then functioned as a guide for the new hole saw. Worked like a charm, required no fancy equipment, and did it myself with no assistance needed.

          ben kaufman, CARACOL (S36 #52)
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