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Removing Fabric from Walls on an S38 Mk I

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  • liberty60657
    I m doing some cosmetic work on my 1983 38, including refinishing the woodwork and replacing some cushion covers. The prior owner replaced the original fabric
    Message 1 of 11 , Dec 3, 2010
      I'm doing some cosmetic work on my 1983 38, including refinishing the woodwork and replacing some cushion covers. The prior owner replaced the original fabric with some very nice ultrasuede but neglected to recover the cushion in the quarterberth and the the walls in the quarterberth and v-berth. I believe they left out the quarterberth cushion because, on this model, its often used as "the garage" and they didn't want fine ultrasuede to be compromised. On the walls, I suspect they didn't care or couldn't figure out how to remove the existing fabric.

      I'm endeavouring to replace the fabric in these places to give the interior a clean and matching look. Unfortunately, I have no idea how to cleanly remove and replace the fabric on the walls. I don't want to start removing the old fabric until I know how I'd replace it.

      Even Glen from Sabre seems to be at a loss. I was hoping to hear that the fabric is glued to some removeable piece of wood on which I could apply fabric and then re-install. But, if its just glued to the fiberglass, I've got a much more difficult project that has lesser chance of looking professional (and thus, I probably won't do it).

      I've posted photos here to show the areas I'm working on....

      http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Sabresailboat/photos/album/256277072/pic/list

      Thanks!
    • Peter Tollini
      On my boat the vinyl fabric is glued to the hull, but it is only inside the locckers. Sabre offered a cypress hull ceiling that gives a very yachty feel,
      Message 2 of 11 , Dec 3, 2010
      On my boat the vinyl fabric is glued to the hull, but it is only inside the locckers.  Sabre offered a cypress hull ceiling that gives a very "yachty" feel, and I was lucky enough to get a boat that had it.  For the work of stripping & gluing new fabric you could probably go with a wood ceiling. Epoxy vertical strips to the hull and then screw 1/4" x 1 1/2" strips of your choice of wood - cypress is light, flexible and traditional. White cedar would be nice as well.
      I pasted a picture out of the S42 brochure illustration.
      Pete

      On Fri, Dec 3, 2010 at 11:12 AM, liberty60657 <liberty60657@...> wrote:
       

      I'm doing some cosmetic work on my 1983 38, including refinishing the woodwork and replacing some cushion covers. The prior owner replaced the original fabric with some very nice ultrasuede but neglected to recover the cushion in the quarterberth and the the walls in the quarterberth and v-berth. I believe they left out the quarterberth cushion because, on this model, its often used as "the garage" and they didn't want fine ultrasuede to be compromised. On the walls, I suspect they didn't care or couldn't figure out how to remove the existing fabric.

      I'm endeavouring to replace the fabric in these places to give the interior a clean and matching look. Unfortunately, I have no idea how to cleanly remove and replace the fabric on the walls. I don't want to start removing the old fabric until I know how I'd replace it.

      Even Glen from Sabre seems to be at a loss. I was hoping to hear that the fabric is glued to some removeable piece of wood on which I could apply fabric and then re-install. But, if its just glued to the fiberglass, I've got a much more difficult project that has lesser chance of looking professional (and thus, I probably won't do it).

      I've posted photos here to show the areas I'm working on....

      http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Sabresailboat/photos/album/256277072/pic/list

      Thanks!


    • Leonard Bertaux
      My 38 mkii has a cherry hull ceiling on both the aft and vee berths. Looking at you photos I didn t see any battens to indicate the fabric was attached to a
      Message 3 of 11 , Dec 3, 2010
        My 38 mkii has a cherry hull ceiling on both the aft and vee berths. Looking at you photos I didn't see any battens to indicate the fabric was attached to a substrate. So my guess is its just contact cement. The vinyl ceiling in the main salon on my boat are installed with the vinyl contact cemented to individual panels secured to the overhead deck with cherry battens and exposed bronze fasteners. It would be another way to go with your hull in lieu of all wood hull ceilings which can be too dark for some.

        Len Bertaux
        Walkabout S38 mkii

        On Dec 3, 2010, at 11:12 AM, liberty60657 wrote:

         

        I'm doing some cosmetic work on my 1983 38, including refinishing the woodwork and replacing some cushion covers. The prior owner replaced the original fabric with some very nice ultrasuede but neglected to recover the cushion in the quarterberth and the the walls in the quarterberth and v-berth. I believe they left out the quarterberth cushion because, on this model, its often used as "the garage" and they didn't want fine ultrasuede to be compromised. On the walls, I suspect they didn't care or couldn't figure out how to remove the existing fabric.

        I'm endeavouring to replace the fabric in these places to give the interior a clean and matching look. Unfortunately, I have no idea how to cleanly remove and replace the fabric on the walls. I don't want to start removing the old fabric until I know how I'd replace it.

        Even Glen from Sabre seems to be at a loss. I was hoping to hear that the fabric is glued to some removeable piece of wood on which I could apply fabric and then re-install. But, if its just glued to the fiberglass, I've got a much more difficult project that has lesser chance of looking professional (and thus, I probably won't do it).

        I've posted photos here to show the areas I'm working on....

        http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Sabresailboat/photos/album/256277072/pic/list

        Thanks!


      • R Coerse
        You might wish to consider covering the inside hull surface with hull ceilings. This is one of the projects I have done to Early ight (a S-34 MK I) Click on
        Message 4 of 11 , Dec 3, 2010
          You might wish to consider covering the inside hull surface with hull ceilings.  This is one of the projects I have done to Early ight (a S-34 MK I) Click on the two links below where my projects are fully documented.  This project can be done in a variety of different hardwoods to suit your personal tastes.

          http://earlylight160.110mb.com/HullCeilings.html
          http://earlylight160.110mb.com/HullCeilingsSalon.html

          Dick Coerse
          "Early Light"
          1982 S-34 MK I  #160
          Solomons, MD


          On 12/3/2010 11:12 AM, liberty60657 wrote:
           

          I'm doing some cosmetic work on my 1983 38, including refinishing the woodwork and replacing some cushion covers. The prior owner replaced the original fabric with some very nice ultrasuede but neglected to recover the cushion in the quarterberth and the the walls in the quarterberth and v-berth. I believe they left out the quarterberth cushion because, on this model, its often used as "the garage" and they didn't want fine ultrasuede to be compromised. On the walls, I suspect they didn't care or couldn't figure out how to remove the existing fabric.

          I'm endeavouring to replace the fabric in these places to give the interior a clean and matching look. Unfortunately, I have no idea how to cleanly remove and replace the fabric on the walls. I don't want to start removing the old fabric until I know how I'd replace it.

          Even Glen from Sabre seems to be at a loss. I was hoping to hear that the fabric is glued to some removeable piece of wood on which I could apply fabric and then re-install. But, if its just glued to the fiberglass, I've got a much more difficult project that has lesser chance of looking professional (and thus, I probably won't do it).

          I've posted photos here to show the areas I'm working on....

          http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Sabresailboat/photos/album/256277072/pic/list

          Thanks!


        • Peter Tollini
          Nice! Your s looks nicer than my Sabre factory job, plus you added the insulation. Pete
          Message 5 of 11 , Dec 3, 2010
            Nice! 
            Your's looks nicer than my Sabre factory job, plus you added the insulation.
            Pete


             
            On Fri, Dec 3, 2010 at 12:01 PM, R Coerse <rcoerse@...> wrote:
             

            You might wish to consider covering the inside hull surface with hull ceilings.  This is one of the projects I have done to Early ight (a S-34 MK I) Click on the two links below where my projects are fully documented.  This project can be done in a variety of different hardwoods to suit your personal tastes.

            http://earlylight160.110mb.com/HullCeilings.html
            http://earlylight160.110mb.com/HullCeilingsSalon.html

            Dick Coerse
            "Early Light"
            1982 S-34 MK I  #160
            Solomons, MD




            On 12/3/2010 11:12 AM, liberty60657 wrote:
             

            I'm doing some cosmetic work on my 1983 38, including refinishing the woodwork and replacing some cushion covers. The prior owner replaced the original fabric with some very nice ultrasuede but neglected to recover the cushion in the quarterberth and the the walls in the quarterberth and v-berth. I believe they left out the quarterberth cushion because, on this model, its often used as "the garage" and they didn't want fine ultrasuede to be compromised. On the walls, I suspect they didn't care or couldn't figure out how to remove the existing fabric.

            I'm endeavouring to replace the fabric in these places to give the interior a clean and matching look. Unfortunately, I have no idea how to cleanly remove and replace the fabric on the walls. I don't want to start removing the old fabric until I know how I'd replace it.

            Even Glen from Sabre seems to be at a loss. I was hoping to hear that the fabric is glued to some removeable piece of wood on which I could apply fabric and then re-install. But, if its just glued to the fiberglass, I've got a much more difficult project that has lesser chance of looking professional (and thus, I probably won't do it).

            I've posted photos here to show the areas I'm working on....

            http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Sabresailboat/photos/album/256277072/pic/list

            Thanks!



          • funinatl1975
            You really did a nice job, looks great! Drew
            Message 6 of 11 , Dec 3, 2010
              You really did a nice job, looks great!
              Drew

              --- In Sabresailboat@yahoogroups.com, R Coerse <rcoerse@...> wrote:
              >
              > You might wish to consider covering the inside hull surface with hull
              > ceilings. This is one of the projects I have done to Early ight (a S-34
              > MK I) Click on the two links below where my projects are fully
              > documented. This project can be done in a variety of different
              > hardwoods to suit your personal tastes.
              >
              > http://earlylight160.110mb.com/HullCeilings.html
              > http://earlylight160.110mb.com/HullCeilingsSalon.html
              >
              > Dick Coerse
              > "Early Light"
              > 1982 S-34 MK I #160
              > Solomons, MD
              >
              >
              > On 12/3/2010 11:12 AM, liberty60657 wrote:
              > >
              > > I'm doing some cosmetic work on my 1983 38, including refinishing the
              > > woodwork and replacing some cushion covers. The prior owner replaced
              > > the original fabric with some very nice ultrasuede but neglected to
              > > recover the cushion in the quarterberth and the the walls in the
              > > quarterberth and v-berth. I believe they left out the quarterberth
              > > cushion because, on this model, its often used as "the garage" and
              > > they didn't want fine ultrasuede to be compromised. On the walls, I
              > > suspect they didn't care or couldn't figure out how to remove the
              > > existing fabric.
              > >
              > > I'm endeavouring to replace the fabric in these places to give the
              > > interior a clean and matching look. Unfortunately, I have no idea how
              > > to cleanly remove and replace the fabric on the walls. I don't want to
              > > start removing the old fabric until I know how I'd replace it.
              > >
              > > Even Glen from Sabre seems to be at a loss. I was hoping to hear that
              > > the fabric is glued to some removeable piece of wood on which I could
              > > apply fabric and then re-install. But, if its just glued to the
              > > fiberglass, I've got a much more difficult project that has lesser
              > > chance of looking professional (and thus, I probably won't do it).
              > >
              > > I've posted photos here to show the areas I'm working on....
              > >
              > > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Sabresailboat/photos/album/256277072/pic/list
              > >
              > > Thanks!
              > >
              > >
              >
            • liberty60657
              Wow, that looks terrific. I spent a month in the Carib on a friend s S38MK II (s/v Ubiquitous, Jim K on this board) and noticed how nice those cypress walls
              Message 7 of 11 , Dec 3, 2010
                Wow, that looks terrific. I spent a month in the Carib on a friend's S38MK II (s/v Ubiquitous, Jim K on this board) and noticed how nice those cypress walls looked.

                This is far more than I bargained for as my woodworking skills aren't much to speak of but, I've got some free time, and the materials are inexpensive (even compared to ultrasuede) so why not learn? So, my dumb questions....

                - Seems as if the thinnest cypress sold is 4/4. Did you just use the band saw to cut that into 1/4 strips?

                - Did you need to bend the strips to conform to the hull? I haven't run a straight edge down there, but since the hull tapers toward the transom, I suspect my quarterberth wall isn't straight.

                - any worries about 1/4 strips warping or do the screw downs mitigate that?

                See, I told you, stupid questions!

                Thanks.


                --- In Sabresailboat@yahoogroups.com, R Coerse <rcoerse@...> wrote:
                >
                > You might wish to consider covering the inside hull surface with hull
                > ceilings. This is one of the projects I have done to Early ight (a S-34
                > MK I) Click on the two links below where my projects are fully
                > documented. This project can be done in a variety of different
                > hardwoods to suit your personal tastes.
                >
                > http://earlylight160.110mb.com/HullCeilings.html
                > http://earlylight160.110mb.com/HullCeilingsSalon.html
                >
                > Dick Coerse
                > "Early Light"
                > 1982 S-34 MK I #160
                > Solomons, MD
                >
                >
                > On 12/3/2010 11:12 AM, liberty60657 wrote:
                > >
                > > I'm doing some cosmetic work on my 1983 38, including refinishing the
                > > woodwork and replacing some cushion covers. The prior owner replaced
                > > the original fabric with some very nice ultrasuede but neglected to
                > > recover the cushion in the quarterberth and the the walls in the
                > > quarterberth and v-berth. I believe they left out the quarterberth
                > > cushion because, on this model, its often used as "the garage" and
                > > they didn't want fine ultrasuede to be compromised. On the walls, I
                > > suspect they didn't care or couldn't figure out how to remove the
                > > existing fabric.
                > >
                > > I'm endeavouring to replace the fabric in these places to give the
                > > interior a clean and matching look. Unfortunately, I have no idea how
                > > to cleanly remove and replace the fabric on the walls. I don't want to
                > > start removing the old fabric until I know how I'd replace it.
                > >
                > > Even Glen from Sabre seems to be at a loss. I was hoping to hear that
                > > the fabric is glued to some removeable piece of wood on which I could
                > > apply fabric and then re-install. But, if its just glued to the
                > > fiberglass, I've got a much more difficult project that has lesser
                > > chance of looking professional (and thus, I probably won't do it).
                > >
                > > I've posted photos here to show the areas I'm working on....
                > >
                > > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Sabresailboat/photos/album/256277072/pic/list
                > >
                > > Thanks!
                > >
                > >
                >
              • R Coerse
                First off, I used satinwood rather than cypress for the hull ceilings mainly because of availability and the light color to contrast all the teak in the
                Message 8 of 11 , Dec 3, 2010
                  First off,  I used satinwood rather than cypress for the hull ceilings mainly because of availability and the light color to contrast all the teak in the cabin.  There are plenty of hardwoods both light and dark that will work well.  I cut the strips slightly thicker than 1/4 inch using a band saw and then took them to a friend's house and ran then through his surface planer till they were 1/4n in thick.  The furring strips that the satinwood is screwed to are on 12 inch centers and the screws pulled them in nicely.  By starting at the bottom, the satinwood ceilings are parallel to the top surface of the berth cushions.  This left 2 or 3 strips at the top which had to be hand fit, but not a real problem.

                  Dick Coerse
                  "Early Light"
                  1982 S-34 MK I #160
                  Solomons, MD

                  On 12/3/2010 7:52 PM, liberty60657 wrote:
                   

                  Wow, that looks terrific. I spent a month in the Carib on a friend's S38MK II (s/v Ubiquitous, Jim K on this board) and noticed how nice those cypress walls looked.

                  This is far more than I bargained for as my woodworking skills aren't much to speak of but, I've got some free time, and the materials are inexpensive (even compared to ultrasuede) so why not learn? So, my dumb questions....

                  - Seems as if the thinnest cypress sold is 4/4. Did you just use the band saw to cut that into 1/4 strips?

                  - Did you need to bend the strips to conform to the hull? I haven't run a straight edge down there, but since the hull tapers toward the transom, I suspect my quarterberth wall isn't straight.

                  - any worries about 1/4 strips warping or do the screw downs mitigate that?

                  See, I told you, stupid questions!

                  Thanks.

                  --- In Sabresailboat@yahoogroups.com, R Coerse <rcoerse@...> wrote:
                  >
                  > You might wish to consider covering the inside hull surface with hull
                  > ceilings. This is one of the projects I have done to Early ight (a S-34
                  > MK I) Click on the two links below where my projects are fully
                  > documented. This project can be done in a variety of different
                  > hardwoods to suit your personal tastes.
                  >
                  > http://earlylight160.110mb.com/HullCeilings.html
                  > http://earlylight160.110mb.com/HullCeilingsSalon.html
                  >
                  > Dick Coerse
                  > "Early Light"
                  > 1982 S-34 MK I #160
                  > Solomons, MD
                  >
                  >
                  > On 12/3/2010 11:12 AM, liberty60657 wrote:
                  > >
                  > > I'm doing some cosmetic work on my 1983 38, including refinishing the
                  > > woodwork and replacing some cushion covers. The prior owner replaced
                  > > the original fabric with some very nice ultrasuede but neglected to
                  > > recover the cushion in the quarterberth and the the walls in the
                  > > quarterberth and v-berth. I believe they left out the quarterberth
                  > > cushion because, on this model, its often used as "the garage" and
                  > > they didn't want fine ultrasuede to be compromised. On the walls, I
                  > > suspect they didn't care or couldn't figure out how to remove the
                  > > existing fabric.
                  > >
                  > > I'm endeavouring to replace the fabric in these places to give the
                  > > interior a clean and matching look. Unfortunately, I have no idea how
                  > > to cleanly remove and replace the fabric on the walls. I don't want to
                  > > start removing the old fabric until I know how I'd replace it.
                  > >
                  > > Even Glen from Sabre seems to be at a loss. I was hoping to hear that
                  > > the fabric is glued to some removeable piece of wood on which I could
                  > > apply fabric and then re-install. But, if its just glued to the
                  > > fiberglass, I've got a much more difficult project that has lesser
                  > > chance of looking professional (and thus, I probably won't do it).
                  > >
                  > > I've posted photos here to show the areas I'm working on....
                  > >
                  > > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Sabresailboat/photos/album/256277072/pic/list
                  > >
                  > > Thanks!
                  > >
                  > >
                  >


                • sailor11767
                  Dick s work, coupled with his documentation and his support of this site make him about 99% above reproach, so I m hesitant to go here. But.... I m not
                  Message 9 of 11 , Dec 3, 2010
                    Dick's work, coupled with his documentation and his support of this site make him about 99% above reproach, so I'm hesitant to go here. But....

                    I'm not entirely sure what a surface planer is. My (admittedly weak) understanding is that a jointer makes one side very smooth and straight (for glue joints, hence the name), but some call it a planer or surface planer. A planer, or some call it a thickness planer, squashes the wood flat to a table, and then mills the top side -- guaranteeing a uniform thickness regardless of any warping and twisting that might be going on. The one time I had a sawmill make me some lumber, they pulled the raw material off the drying racks, sent it over the jointer to make one side smooth and straight, and then through the planer to make uniform boards. I think the right tool for finishing off those strips for the ceiling project is a "thickness planer."

                    All that said, I'll put out an offer -- for those that are in the Annapolis area, I have a thickness planer that can handle boards up to about a foot wide and about 4" thick. It ain't perfect (it has at least one nick in the blades, makes a 1/32 thick by 1/32 wide bead on the plank), but it does a pretty good job that can be worked with. If any Sabre owner has a board (or 8 or 10) that they have cut to size, but want to make it uniform thickness (ie, sent through a planer), drop me a note. This project screams out for this kind of tool, that not everyone owns. I bought it when I was building kitchen cabinets from scratch many years ago.

                    Oh, I also have a lead on a local sawmill that sells local species, marginally dried, at dirt cheap prices. One price they quoted me was white oak for $1/BF. Wow. Yeah, it is likely to warp and check and crack, but that's a price that you can work with for some projects! Obviously not finish cabinetry, but that is white oak rough timbers for less than the Depot sells pine 2x4's!

                    It's a standing offer. Just email me.

                    Harry
                    Rantum Scoot
                    '79 S34-I #063
                    Luce Creek, Annapolis

                    --- In Sabresailboat@yahoogroups.com, R Coerse <rcoerse@...> wrote:
                    >
                    > First off, I used satinwood rather than cypress for the hull ceilings
                    > mainly because of availability and the light color to contrast all the
                    > teak in the cabin. There are plenty of hardwoods both light and dark
                    > that will work well. I cut the strips slightly thicker than 1/4 inch
                    > using a band saw and then took them to a friend's house and ran then
                    > through his surface planer till they were 1/4n in thick. The furring
                    > strips that the satinwood is screwed to are on 12 inch centers and the
                    > screws pulled them in nicely. By starting at the bottom, the satinwood
                    > ceilings are parallel to the top surface of the berth cushions. This
                    > left 2 or 3 strips at the top which had to be hand fit, but not a real
                    > problem.
                    >
                    > Dick Coerse
                    > "Early Light"
                    > 1982 S-34 MK I #160
                    > Solomons, MD
                    >
                    > On 12/3/2010 7:52 PM, liberty60657 wrote:
                    > >
                    > > Wow, that looks terrific. I spent a month in the Carib on a friend's
                    > > S38MK II (s/v Ubiquitous, Jim K on this board) and noticed how nice
                    > > those cypress walls looked.
                    > >
                    > > This is far more than I bargained for as my woodworking skills aren't
                    > > much to speak of but, I've got some free time, and the materials are
                    > > inexpensive (even compared to ultrasuede) so why not learn? So, my
                    > > dumb questions....
                    > >
                    > > - Seems as if the thinnest cypress sold is 4/4. Did you just use the
                    > > band saw to cut that into 1/4 strips?
                    > >
                    > > - Did you need to bend the strips to conform to the hull? I haven't
                    > > run a straight edge down there, but since the hull tapers toward the
                    > > transom, I suspect my quarterberth wall isn't straight.
                    > >
                    > > - any worries about 1/4 strips warping or do the screw downs mitigate
                    > > that?
                    > >
                    > > See, I told you, stupid questions!
                    > >
                    > > Thanks.
                    > >
                    > > --- In Sabresailboat@yahoogroups.com
                    > > <mailto:Sabresailboat%40yahoogroups.com>, R Coerse <rcoerse@> wrote:
                    > > >
                    > > > You might wish to consider covering the inside hull surface with hull
                    > > > ceilings. This is one of the projects I have done to Early ight (a S-34
                    > > > MK I) Click on the two links below where my projects are fully
                    > > > documented. This project can be done in a variety of different
                    > > > hardwoods to suit your personal tastes.
                    > > >
                    > > > http://earlylight160.110mb.com/HullCeilings.html
                    > > > http://earlylight160.110mb.com/HullCeilingsSalon.html
                    > > >
                    > > > Dick Coerse
                    > > > "Early Light"
                    > > > 1982 S-34 MK I #160
                    > > > Solomons, MD
                    > > >
                    > > >
                    > > > On 12/3/2010 11:12 AM, liberty60657 wrote:
                    > > > >
                    > > > > I'm doing some cosmetic work on my 1983 38, including refinishing the
                    > > > > woodwork and replacing some cushion covers. The prior owner replaced
                    > > > > the original fabric with some very nice ultrasuede but neglected to
                    > > > > recover the cushion in the quarterberth and the the walls in the
                    > > > > quarterberth and v-berth. I believe they left out the quarterberth
                    > > > > cushion because, on this model, its often used as "the garage" and
                    > > > > they didn't want fine ultrasuede to be compromised. On the walls, I
                    > > > > suspect they didn't care or couldn't figure out how to remove the
                    > > > > existing fabric.
                    > > > >
                    > > > > I'm endeavouring to replace the fabric in these places to give the
                    > > > > interior a clean and matching look. Unfortunately, I have no idea how
                    > > > > to cleanly remove and replace the fabric on the walls. I don't
                    > > want to
                    > > > > start removing the old fabric until I know how I'd replace it.
                    > > > >
                    > > > > Even Glen from Sabre seems to be at a loss. I was hoping to hear that
                    > > > > the fabric is glued to some removeable piece of wood on which I could
                    > > > > apply fabric and then re-install. But, if its just glued to the
                    > > > > fiberglass, I've got a much more difficult project that has lesser
                    > > > > chance of looking professional (and thus, I probably won't do it).
                    > > > >
                    > > > > I've posted photos here to show the areas I'm working on....
                    > > > >
                    > > > >
                    > > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Sabresailboat/photos/album/256277072/pic/list
                    > > > >
                    > > > > Thanks!
                    > > > >
                    > > > >
                    > > >
                    > >
                    > >
                    >
                  • R Coerse
                    Harry, The terms thickness planer and surface planer seem to be used interchangeably. Same tool. :-) Sorry I caused confusion. Dick
                    Message 10 of 11 , Dec 3, 2010
                      Harry,
                      The terms "thickness planer" and "surface planer" seem to be used interchangeably.  Same tool.  :-)       Sorry I caused confusion.
                      Dick

                      On 12/3/2010 10:19 PM, sailor11767 wrote:
                       

                      Dick's work, coupled with his documentation and his support of this site make him about 99% above reproach, so I'm hesitant to go here. But....

                      I'm not entirely sure what a surface planer is. My (admittedly weak) understanding is that a jointer makes one side very smooth and straight (for glue joints, hence the name), but some call it a planer or surface planer. A planer, or some call it a thickness planer, squashes the wood flat to a table, and then mills the top side -- guaranteeing a uniform thickness regardless of any warping and twisting that might be going on. The one time I had a sawmill make me some lumber, they pulled the raw material off the drying racks, sent it over the jointer to make one side smooth and straight, and then through the planer to make uniform boards. I think the right tool for finishing off those strips for the ceiling project is a "thickness planer."

                      All that said, I'll put out an offer -- for those that are in the Annapolis area, I have a thickness planer that can handle boards up to about a foot wide and about 4" thick. It ain't perfect (it has at least one nick in the blades, makes a 1/32 thick by 1/32 wide bead on the plank), but it does a pretty good job that can be worked with. If any Sabre owner has a board (or 8 or 10) that they have cut to size, but want to make it uniform thickness (ie, sent through a planer), drop me a note. This project screams out for this kind of tool, that not everyone owns. I bought it when I was building kitchen cabinets from scratch many years ago.

                      Oh, I also have a lead on a local sawmill that sells local species, marginally dried, at dirt cheap prices. One price they quoted me was white oak for $1/BF. Wow. Yeah, it is likely to warp and check and crack, but that's a price that you can work with for some projects! Obviously not finish cabinetry, but that is white oak rough timbers for less than the Depot sells pine 2x4's!

                      It's a standing offer. Just email me.

                      Harry
                      Rantum Scoot
                      '79 S34-I #063
                      Luce Creek, Annapolis

                      --- In Sabresailboat@yahoogroups.com, R Coerse <rcoerse@...> wrote:
                      >
                      > First off, I used satinwood rather than cypress for the hull ceilings
                      > mainly because of availability and the light color to contrast all the
                      > teak in the cabin. There are plenty of hardwoods both light and dark
                      > that will work well. I cut the strips slightly thicker than 1/4 inch
                      > using a band saw and then took them to a friend's house and ran then
                      > through his surface planer till they were 1/4n in thick. The furring
                      > strips that the satinwood is screwed to are on 12 inch centers and the
                      > screws pulled them in nicely. By starting at the bottom, the satinwood
                      > ceilings are parallel to the top surface of the berth cushions. This
                      > left 2 or 3 strips at the top which had to be hand fit, but not a real
                      > problem.
                      >
                      > Dick Coerse
                      > "Early Light"
                      > 1982 S-34 MK I #160
                      > Solomons, MD
                      >
                      > On 12/3/2010 7:52 PM, liberty60657 wrote:
                      > >
                      > > Wow, that looks terrific. I spent a month in the Carib on a friend's
                      > > S38MK II (s/v Ubiquitous, Jim K on this board) and noticed how nice
                      > > those cypress walls looked.
                      > >
                      > > This is far more than I bargained for as my woodworking skills aren't
                      > > much to speak of but, I've got some free time, and the materials are
                      > > inexpensive (even compared to ultrasuede) so why not learn? So, my
                      > > dumb questions....
                      > >
                      > > - Seems as if the thinnest cypress sold is 4/4. Did you just use the
                      > > band saw to cut that into 1/4 strips?
                      > >
                      > > - Did you need to bend the strips to conform to the hull? I haven't
                      > > run a straight edge down there, but since the hull tapers toward the
                      > > transom, I suspect my quarterberth wall isn't straight.
                      > >
                      > > - any worries about 1/4 strips warping or do the screw downs mitigate
                      > > that?
                      > >
                      > > See, I told you, stupid questions!
                      > >
                      > > Thanks.
                      > >
                      > > --- In Sabresailboat@yahoogroups.com
                      > > <mailto:Sabresailboat%40yahoogroups.com>, R Coerse <rcoerse@> wrote:
                      > > >
                      > > > You might wish to consider covering the inside hull surface with hull
                      > > > ceilings. This is one of the projects I have done to Early ight (a S-34
                      > > > MK I) Click on the two links below where my projects are fully
                      > > > documented. This project can be done in a variety of different
                      > > > hardwoods to suit your personal tastes.
                      > > >
                      > > > http://earlylight160.110mb.com/HullCeilings.html
                      > > > http://earlylight160.110mb.com/HullCeilingsSalon.html
                      > > >
                      > > > Dick Coerse
                      > > > "Early Light"
                      > > > 1982 S-34 MK I #160
                      > > > Solomons, MD
                      > > >
                      > > >
                      > > > On 12/3/2010 11:12 AM, liberty60657 wrote:
                      > > > >
                      > > > > I'm doing some cosmetic work on my 1983 38, including refinishing the
                      > > > > woodwork and replacing some cushion covers. The prior owner replaced
                      > > > > the original fabric with some very nice ultrasuede but neglected to
                      > > > > recover the cushion in the quarterberth and the the walls in the
                      > > > > quarterberth and v-berth. I believe they left out the quarterberth
                      > > > > cushion because, on this model, its often used as "the garage" and
                      > > > > they didn't want fine ultrasuede to be compromised. On the walls, I
                      > > > > suspect they didn't care or couldn't figure out how to remove the
                      > > > > existing fabric.
                      > > > >
                      > > > > I'm endeavouring to replace the fabric in these places to give the
                      > > > > interior a clean and matching look. Unfortunately, I have no idea how
                      > > > > to cleanly remove and replace the fabric on the walls. I don't
                      > > want to
                      > > > > start removing the old fabric until I know how I'd replace it.
                      > > > >
                      > > > > Even Glen from Sabre seems to be at a loss. I was hoping to hear that
                      > > > > the fabric is glued to some removeable piece of wood on which I could
                      > > > > apply fabric and then re-install. But, if its just glued to the
                      > > > > fiberglass, I've got a much more difficult project that has lesser
                      > > > > chance of looking professional (and thus, I probably won't do it).
                      > > > >
                      > > > > I've posted photos here to show the areas I'm working on....
                      > > > >
                      > > > >
                      > > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Sabresailboat/photos/album/256277072/pic/list
                      > > > >
                      > > > > Thanks!
                      > > > >
                      > > > >
                      > > >
                      > >
                      > >
                      >


                    • sailor11767
                      They do get interchanged a lot. And I always get confused! But as Juliet said, that which we call a rose by any other name would smell as sweet. And that
                      Message 11 of 11 , Dec 6, 2010
                        They do get interchanged a lot. And I always get confused! But as Juliet said, "that which we call a rose by any other name would smell as sweet." And that tool is the right tool for the job.

                        Harry

                        --- In Sabresailboat@yahoogroups.com, R Coerse <rcoerse@...> wrote:
                        >
                        > Harry,
                        > The terms "thickness planer" and "surface planer" seem to be used
                        > interchangeably. Same tool. :-) Sorry I caused confusion.
                        > Dick
                        >
                        > On 12/3/2010 10:19 PM, sailor11767 wrote:
                        > >
                        > > Dick's work, coupled with his documentation and his support of this
                        > > site make him about 99% above reproach, so I'm hesitant to go here.
                        > > But....
                        > >
                        > > I'm not entirely sure what a surface planer is. My (admittedly weak)
                        > > understanding is that a jointer makes one side very smooth and
                        > > straight (for glue joints, hence the name), but some call it a planer
                        > > or surface planer. A planer, or some call it a thickness planer,
                        > > squashes the wood flat to a table, and then mills the top side --
                        > > guaranteeing a uniform thickness regardless of any warping and
                        > > twisting that might be going on. The one time I had a sawmill make me
                        > > some lumber, they pulled the raw material off the drying racks, sent
                        > > it over the jointer to make one side smooth and straight, and then
                        > > through the planer to make uniform boards. I think the right tool for
                        > > finishing off those strips for the ceiling project is a "thickness
                        > > planer."
                        > >
                        > > All that said, I'll put out an offer -- for those that are in the
                        > > Annapolis area, I have a thickness planer that can handle boards up to
                        > > about a foot wide and about 4" thick. It ain't perfect (it has at
                        > > least one nick in the blades, makes a 1/32 thick by 1/32 wide bead on
                        > > the plank), but it does a pretty good job that can be worked with. If
                        > > any Sabre owner has a board (or 8 or 10) that they have cut to size,
                        > > but want to make it uniform thickness (ie, sent through a planer),
                        > > drop me a note. This project screams out for this kind of tool, that
                        > > not everyone owns. I bought it when I was building kitchen cabinets
                        > > from scratch many years ago.
                        > >
                        > > Oh, I also have a lead on a local sawmill that sells local species,
                        > > marginally dried, at dirt cheap prices. One price they quoted me was
                        > > white oak for $1/BF. Wow. Yeah, it is likely to warp and check and
                        > > crack, but that's a price that you can work with for some projects!
                        > > Obviously not finish cabinetry, but that is white oak rough timbers
                        > > for less than the Depot sells pine 2x4's!
                        > >
                        > > It's a standing offer. Just email me.
                        > >
                        > > Harry
                        > > Rantum Scoot
                        > > '79 S34-I #063
                        > > Luce Creek, Annapolis
                        > >
                        > > --- In Sabresailboat@yahoogroups.com
                        > > <mailto:Sabresailboat%40yahoogroups.com>, R Coerse <rcoerse@> wrote:
                        > > >
                        > > > First off, I used satinwood rather than cypress for the hull ceilings
                        > > > mainly because of availability and the light color to contrast all the
                        > > > teak in the cabin. There are plenty of hardwoods both light and dark
                        > > > that will work well. I cut the strips slightly thicker than 1/4 inch
                        > > > using a band saw and then took them to a friend's house and ran then
                        > > > through his surface planer till they were 1/4n in thick. The furring
                        > > > strips that the satinwood is screwed to are on 12 inch centers and the
                        > > > screws pulled them in nicely. By starting at the bottom, the satinwood
                        > > > ceilings are parallel to the top surface of the berth cushions. This
                        > > > left 2 or 3 strips at the top which had to be hand fit, but not a real
                        > > > problem.
                        > > >
                        > > > Dick Coerse
                        > > > "Early Light"
                        > > > 1982 S-34 MK I #160
                        > > > Solomons, MD
                        > > >
                        > > > On 12/3/2010 7:52 PM, liberty60657 wrote:
                        > > > >
                        > > > > Wow, that looks terrific. I spent a month in the Carib on a friend's
                        > > > > S38MK II (s/v Ubiquitous, Jim K on this board) and noticed how nice
                        > > > > those cypress walls looked.
                        > > > >
                        > > > > This is far more than I bargained for as my woodworking skills aren't
                        > > > > much to speak of but, I've got some free time, and the materials are
                        > > > > inexpensive (even compared to ultrasuede) so why not learn? So, my
                        > > > > dumb questions....
                        > > > >
                        > > > > - Seems as if the thinnest cypress sold is 4/4. Did you just use the
                        > > > > band saw to cut that into 1/4 strips?
                        > > > >
                        > > > > - Did you need to bend the strips to conform to the hull? I haven't
                        > > > > run a straight edge down there, but since the hull tapers toward the
                        > > > > transom, I suspect my quarterberth wall isn't straight.
                        > > > >
                        > > > > - any worries about 1/4 strips warping or do the screw downs mitigate
                        > > > > that?
                        > > > >
                        > > > > See, I told you, stupid questions!
                        > > > >
                        > > > > Thanks.
                        > > > >
                        > > > > --- In Sabresailboat@yahoogroups.com
                        > > <mailto:Sabresailboat%40yahoogroups.com>
                        > > > > <mailto:Sabresailboat%40yahoogroups.com>, R Coerse <rcoerse@> wrote:
                        > > > > >
                        > > > > > You might wish to consider covering the inside hull surface with
                        > > hull
                        > > > > > ceilings. This is one of the projects I have done to Early ight
                        > > (a S-34
                        > > > > > MK I) Click on the two links below where my projects are fully
                        > > > > > documented. This project can be done in a variety of different
                        > > > > > hardwoods to suit your personal tastes.
                        > > > > >
                        > > > > > http://earlylight160.110mb.com/HullCeilings.html
                        > > > > > http://earlylight160.110mb.com/HullCeilingsSalon.html
                        > > > > >
                        > > > > > Dick Coerse
                        > > > > > "Early Light"
                        > > > > > 1982 S-34 MK I #160
                        > > > > > Solomons, MD
                        > > > > >
                        > > > > >
                        > > > > > On 12/3/2010 11:12 AM, liberty60657 wrote:
                        > > > > > >
                        > > > > > > I'm doing some cosmetic work on my 1983 38, including
                        > > refinishing the
                        > > > > > > woodwork and replacing some cushion covers. The prior owner
                        > > replaced
                        > > > > > > the original fabric with some very nice ultrasuede but
                        > > neglected to
                        > > > > > > recover the cushion in the quarterberth and the the walls in the
                        > > > > > > quarterberth and v-berth. I believe they left out the quarterberth
                        > > > > > > cushion because, on this model, its often used as "the garage" and
                        > > > > > > they didn't want fine ultrasuede to be compromised. On the
                        > > walls, I
                        > > > > > > suspect they didn't care or couldn't figure out how to remove the
                        > > > > > > existing fabric.
                        > > > > > >
                        > > > > > > I'm endeavouring to replace the fabric in these places to give the
                        > > > > > > interior a clean and matching look. Unfortunately, I have no
                        > > idea how
                        > > > > > > to cleanly remove and replace the fabric on the walls. I don't
                        > > > > want to
                        > > > > > > start removing the old fabric until I know how I'd replace it.
                        > > > > > >
                        > > > > > > Even Glen from Sabre seems to be at a loss. I was hoping to
                        > > hear that
                        > > > > > > the fabric is glued to some removeable piece of wood on which
                        > > I could
                        > > > > > > apply fabric and then re-install. But, if its just glued to the
                        > > > > > > fiberglass, I've got a much more difficult project that has lesser
                        > > > > > > chance of looking professional (and thus, I probably won't do it).
                        > > > > > >
                        > > > > > > I've posted photos here to show the areas I'm working on....
                        > > > > > >
                        > > > > > >
                        > > > >
                        > > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Sabresailboat/photos/album/256277072/pic/list
                        > > > > > >
                        > > > > > > Thanks!
                        > > > > > >
                        > > > > > >
                        > > > > >
                        > > > >
                        > > > >
                        > > >
                        > >
                        > >
                        >
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