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Re: [SabreSailboat] Re: sabre 34 info sought

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  • john kalinowski
    I have a 32 and it takes 56 cranks from top to bottom   12-13 sounds wrong as that would mean you need 4x the power since you do not have the leverage.  May
    Message 1 of 16 , Oct 3, 2009
      I have a 32 and it takes 56 cranks from top to bottom
       
      12-13 sounds wrong as that would mean you need 4x the power since you do not have the leverage.  May want to perform a full check at next haulout.  If you are not getting it all the way down, you are pretty some nasty loads on the cable and it will cause it to part if you are one who does not mind slamming to weather in big seas..
       
      john

      --- On Fri, 10/2/09, josrulz_2001 <josrulz_2001@...> wrote:

      From: josrulz_2001 <josrulz_2001@...>
      Subject: [SabreSailboat] Re: sabre 34 info sought
      To: Sabresailboat@yahoogroups.com
      Date: Friday, October 2, 2009, 1:24 PM

       
      I'll second much of what Harry said. We have the Keel/CB model, also on the Chesapeake, and also easily track on the GPS with 90 degree tacks, if not narrower. I'm very happy with upwind performance, and love the shoal draft.

      Harry, you mentioned 40 cranks to lower the centerboard. Mine is about 13-14. For those familiar with various 34-Is, were there different CB crank versions over the years? I'm pretty sure our cable wouldn't even be long enough for 40 cranks.

      Thanks,
      Jim

      --- In Sabresailboat@ yahoogroups. com, "Harry" <HarryK@...> wrote:
      >
      > I'm a recent (June 09) owner of a 34-I, and have been through many of the issues you've asked. If the search feature worked, you could find many answers to this question. A somewhat effective answer to searching the history is to use Google, and use this search syntax:
      > search term words site:http://groups. yahoo.com/ group/Sabresailb oat/
      > and Google will search within this group. Awkward, but until Yahoo fixes it, it helps.
      > A few comments. I do race as crew on a variety of performance boats, and race my Lightning, so I did want a boat that had some performance. I think the Sabre provides that performance in a boat that is fun and comfortable to sail.
      >
      > * Mine is a C/B. Getting the board up and down couldn't be easier -- it's 40 low-effort cranks each way. My boat had a very deteriorated cable, and the yard wouldn't let me do the replacement (insurance wouldn't let me on the boat when it was in the lift, which it had to be to do the job) and so they quoted me $500 to replace a $20 cable. The actual bill was $1000, which while it really pissed me off was no surprise. It's just a maintenance item, but be aware of it. If I'm closer than about 70 degrees, I put the board down. With the board down, I find tracking to be great, and she tacks through 90 degrees -- what more could I want? On the Chesapeake, the C/B (or a low draft boat) were high on my list of desirable features.
      >
      > * I've hit 6+ by GPS when beating, and done 7.3 dead down with the jib poled out. Not bad for 34 feet.
      >
      > * My cabin sole is rotted. It happens to many, and I'm sure it factored into the asking (and the offered!) price. Google Early Light for some photo documentation of a Sabre 34 sole replacement (and many other outstanding projects!).
      >
      > * The mast step is an Achillies Heel. Not sure if mine is good or bad. They take on water and rot, which is apparently an expensive fix (mast has to come out, and the sole is in the way).
      >
      > * Many of these MK 1 had Volvo diesels. They work fine if they work, but are VERY expensive to fix. Some parts (manifold I believe is one) are enough to make people seriously consider repowering. A rebuild kit (not counting labor) also has that result. Most Volvo's are raw water cooled, but mine has add-on (but Volvo approved) conversion.
      >
      > * I have darkening on the knees for my chainplates (water infiltration and/or damage). The surveyor missed this, so I have no "professional opinion" about their integrity -- I'd recommend removing the covers and examining all six of them before an offer and before you even pay for a surveyor.
      >
      > * I believe that the MK1 came standard with self tailing primaries, a major plus for short handed sailing especially with the big jib. The jib sure is big, and the main sure is small, and the mast sure is tall. Mine has the Lewmar 44 factory upgrade -- I think the 42 was standard. I have yet to reef the jib (I hate reefing a roller furler!), but I have had no problem trimming in (albeit slowly) the jib in rail-down weather. I have reefed the main, which is easy if not overly meaningful.
      >
      > * Never sailed main alone yet, although I did a short passage last weekend jib alone, and we crept up on close hauled a few times with no real problems.
      >
      > * I actually like the boom. It's high enough (and short enough) to be out of the way (good safety feature for inexperience crew), and at the same time it isn't way off the cabin top and hard to furl. Another boat on my short list was the Ericson 35 MK II, and the boom on that was ridiculously high.
      >
      > * The cockpit is nice, although a touch small (I liked the Ericson cockpit much more!). The well around the wheel is not big enough to easily get around the wheel, but the flip side (from people with models with a wider opening) is that I can actually lay down or sleep on my cockpit seats.
      >
      > * The cabin top traveler, while theoretically a performance hit, sure is nice.
      >
      > * There were a few changes in the MK1 line to be aware of. The storage over the settee's on mine is open shelves and while laminate sliders, while newer ones have very nice wood systems. Newer boats have a third opening portlight just aft of the mast (although they all have a mid-cabin hatch which is a major plus). Newer boats have a crash bar in front of the stove (a survey ding I'm wrestling with an attractive solution for.) Newer boats (maybe newer than the MK1 line) have proper lockers for the CNG tank.
      >
      > * At least as early as #63 ('79) they had breakers instead of fuses, a plus. Don't know if that was all the way to hull #1 or not. Factory wiring, while it has kept my boat running for 30 years, is certainly not "heavy duty" -- my entire house panel is fed by a single #10 wire.
      >
      > * I find the galley to work well, with the double sink and the peninsula a plus. The storage so far seems good, but we are still adding goodies to the inventory. The ice box is under insulated (just what is the "R" value of 1" plywood?!). The fact that the companionway ladder is part of the galley worksurface is a bit of a gross thought, but it does make for better use of space.
      >
      > * Engine access is sort of a mixed opinion, although if you take off the counter top (no tools required) and the cabinetry face (some tools required), then you have loads of access. The back of the engine, accessed from the starboard locker after removing gear and panels, is tight.
      >
      > * I found my Perko battery switch felt "odd" and when I took of the access panel behind it, it literally fell apart in 50+ pieces. Fortunately I did NOT fry my alternator, and while it is a cheap and easy fix you should take a look at it.
      >
      > * The factory Beckson portlights are not popular on this group, and many have replaced them. Others have looked at that price tag and bought a jib instead. Mine leak, and new covers/screens/ gaskets run close to $100 per window.
      >
      > * I have a scan of the Sabre owner's manual if that would help you any.
      >
      > Other boats to consider are the Ericson 35 MK II (solid hull like the Sabre) and late 70's early 80's C&C 34's (although they are cored hulls).
      >
      > Good luck with the search -- and write back when you've looked!
      >
      > Harry
      > Rantum Scoot
      > '79 S34-I #063
      > Luce Creek, Annapolis
      >
      >
      > ----- Original Message -----
      > From: yamiracer
      > To: Sabresailboat@ yahoogroups. com
      > Sent: Fri 02 Oct 2009 11:20
      > Subject: [SabreSailboat] sabre 34 info sought
      >
      >
      > hi all,
      >
      > i currently sail a pearson 28, and am getting ready to move to a slightly larger boat. sabre 34-1 boats are on the short list (along with tartan 33, beneteau 345, pearson 10m, hunter 33, pearson 32, bristol 35.5, and a few others).
      >
      > i'm looking for any issues current or past owners have had, things you love/hate about the boat, etc. also, centerboard vs. non-centerboard performance. my primary concern with the boat is shared with all high aspect main/big genoa boats of the late 70's/early 80's. namely sailing performance under main alone and managing a (for me anyway) very large genoa. i like fall/spring sailing (when the wind blows), and sail area management in heavy weather is a big, big issue for me. this is one of the reasons i am attracted to the tartan 33. however, the tartan's cored hull and quirky interior are somewhat off-putting.
      >
      > i'm getting ready to go see acouple sabre 34's, so any and all input will be genuinely appreciated.
      >
      > best regards,
      >
      > rw
      >


    • artherrien
      rw, If you sail the Sabre 34 Mk I, you ll likely fall in love with it. My wife and I were out last Fri (9/25) in a steady 25 mph wind, with significant gusts.
      Message 2 of 16 , Oct 3, 2009
        rw,

        If you sail the Sabre 34 Mk I, you'll likely fall in love with it. My wife and I were out last Fri (9/25) in a steady 25 mph wind, with significant gusts. I had the main sail reefed to the first reef point, and the genoa at about 100%. The boat was steady as a rock, and we kept about 6.4 mph SOG close hauled.

        Check out this web site to compare boat "Comfort Factors" and "Capsize Ratios". http://www.image-ination.com/sailcalc.html

        I think you'll find the Sabre 34 compares well to all the others you have listed (I might be a bit biased :-)) The Bristol 35.5 is perhaps a bit more stable in rough weather, but the price difference might be significant.

        Good luck hunting.

        Alan T


        --- In Sabresailboat@yahoogroups.com, "yamiracer" <yamiracer@...> wrote:
        >
        > hi all,
        >
        > i currently sail a pearson 28, and am getting ready to move to a slightly larger boat. sabre 34-1 boats are on the short list (along with tartan 33, beneteau 345, pearson 10m, hunter 33, pearson 32, bristol 35.5, and a few others).
        >
        > i'm looking for any issues current or past owners have had, things you love/hate about the boat, etc. also, centerboard vs. non-centerboard performance. my primary concern with the boat is shared with all high aspect main/big genoa boats of the late 70's/early 80's. namely sailing performance under main alone and managing a (for me anyway) very large genoa. i like fall/spring sailing (when the wind blows), and sail area management in heavy weather is a big, big issue for me. this is one of the reasons i am attracted to the tartan 33. however, the tartan's cored hull and quirky interior are somewhat off-putting.
        >
        > i'm getting ready to go see acouple sabre 34's, so any and all input will be genuinely appreciated.
        >
        > best regards,
        >
        > rw
        >
      • josrulz_2001
        Thanks for all the info re: centerboard cranks. I ll check it next time I dive on the boat or certainly when I haul out. That ll be the only way to find
        Message 3 of 16 , Oct 3, 2009
          Thanks for all the info re: centerboard cranks. I'll check it next time I dive on the boat or certainly when I haul out. That'll be the only way to find out--look at it....


          --- In Sabresailboat@yahoogroups.com, john kalinowski <sabre32sailor@...> wrote:
          >
          > I have a 32 and it takes 56 cranks from top to bottom
          >  
          > 12-13 sounds wrong as that would mean you need 4x the power since you do not have the leverage.  May want to perform a full check at next haulout.  If you are not getting it all the way down, you are pretty some nasty loads on the cable and it will cause it to part if you are one who does not mind slamming to weather in big seas..
          >  
          > john
          >
          > --- On Fri, 10/2/09, josrulz_2001 <josrulz_2001@...> wrote:
          >
          >
          > From: josrulz_2001 <josrulz_2001@...>
          > Subject: [SabreSailboat] Re: sabre 34 info sought
          > To: Sabresailboat@yahoogroups.com
          > Date: Friday, October 2, 2009, 1:24 PM
          >
          >
          >  
          >
          >
          >
          > I'll second much of what Harry said. We have the Keel/CB model, also on the Chesapeake, and also easily track on the GPS with 90 degree tacks, if not narrower. I'm very happy with upwind performance, and love the shoal draft.
          >
          > Harry, you mentioned 40 cranks to lower the centerboard. Mine is about 13-14. For those familiar with various 34-Is, were there different CB crank versions over the years? I'm pretty sure our cable wouldn't even be long enough for 40 cranks.
          >
          > Thanks,
          > Jim
          >
          > --- In Sabresailboat@ yahoogroups. com, "Harry" <HarryK@> wrote:
          > >
          > > I'm a recent (June 09) owner of a 34-I, and have been through many of the issues you've asked. If the search feature worked, you could find many answers to this question. A somewhat effective answer to searching the history is to use Google, and use this search syntax:
          > > search term words site:http://groups. yahoo.com/ group/Sabresailb oat/
          > > and Google will search within this group. Awkward, but until Yahoo fixes it, it helps.
          > > A few comments. I do race as crew on a variety of performance boats, and race my Lightning, so I did want a boat that had some performance. I think the Sabre provides that performance in a boat that is fun and comfortable to sail.
          > >
          > > * Mine is a C/B. Getting the board up and down couldn't be easier -- it's 40 low-effort cranks each way. My boat had a very deteriorated cable, and the yard wouldn't let me do the replacement (insurance wouldn't let me on the boat when it was in the lift, which it had to be to do the job) and so they quoted me $500 to replace a $20 cable. The actual bill was $1000, which while it really pissed me off was no surprise. It's just a maintenance item, but be aware of it. If I'm closer than about 70 degrees, I put the board down. With the board down, I find tracking to be great, and she tacks through 90 degrees -- what more could I want? On the Chesapeake, the C/B (or a low draft boat) were high on my list of desirable features.
          > >
          > > * I've hit 6+ by GPS when beating, and done 7.3 dead down with the jib poled out. Not bad for 34 feet.
          > >
          > > * My cabin sole is rotted. It happens to many, and I'm sure it factored into the asking (and the offered!) price. Google Early Light for some photo documentation of a Sabre 34 sole replacement (and many other outstanding projects!).
          > >
          > > * The mast step is an Achillies Heel. Not sure if mine is good or bad. They take on water and rot, which is apparently an expensive fix (mast has to come out, and the sole is in the way).
          > >
          > > * Many of these MK 1 had Volvo diesels. They work fine if they work, but are VERY expensive to fix. Some parts (manifold I believe is one) are enough to make people seriously consider repowering. A rebuild kit (not counting labor) also has that result. Most Volvo's are raw water cooled, but mine has add-on (but Volvo approved) conversion.
          > >
          > > * I have darkening on the knees for my chainplates (water infiltration and/or damage). The surveyor missed this, so I have no "professional opinion" about their integrity -- I'd recommend removing the covers and examining all six of them before an offer and before you even pay for a surveyor.
          > >
          > > * I believe that the MK1 came standard with self tailing primaries, a major plus for short handed sailing especially with the big jib. The jib sure is big, and the main sure is small, and the mast sure is tall. Mine has the Lewmar 44 factory upgrade -- I think the 42 was standard. I have yet to reef the jib (I hate reefing a roller furler!), but I have had no problem trimming in (albeit slowly) the jib in rail-down weather. I have reefed the main, which is easy if not overly meaningful.
          > >
          > > * Never sailed main alone yet, although I did a short passage last weekend jib alone, and we crept up on close hauled a few times with no real problems.
          > >
          > > * I actually like the boom. It's high enough (and short enough) to be out of the way (good safety feature for inexperience crew), and at the same time it isn't way off the cabin top and hard to furl. Another boat on my short list was the Ericson 35 MK II, and the boom on that was ridiculously high.
          > >
          > > * The cockpit is nice, although a touch small (I liked the Ericson cockpit much more!). The well around the wheel is not big enough to easily get around the wheel, but the flip side (from people with models with a wider opening) is that I can actually lay down or sleep on my cockpit seats.
          > >
          > > * The cabin top traveler, while theoretically a performance hit, sure is nice.
          > >
          > > * There were a few changes in the MK1 line to be aware of. The storage over the settee's on mine is open shelves and while laminate sliders, while newer ones have very nice wood systems. Newer boats have a third opening portlight just aft of the mast (although they all have a mid-cabin hatch which is a major plus). Newer boats have a crash bar in front of the stove (a survey ding I'm wrestling with an attractive solution for.) Newer boats (maybe newer than the MK1 line) have proper lockers for the CNG tank.
          > >
          > > * At least as early as #63 ('79) they had breakers instead of fuses, a plus. Don't know if that was all the way to hull #1 or not. Factory wiring, while it has kept my boat running for 30 years, is certainly not "heavy duty" -- my entire house panel is fed by a single #10 wire.
          > >
          > > * I find the galley to work well, with the double sink and the peninsula a plus. The storage so far seems good, but we are still adding goodies to the inventory. The ice box is under insulated (just what is the "R" value of 1" plywood?!). The fact that the companionway ladder is part of the galley worksurface is a bit of a gross thought, but it does make for better use of space.
          > >
          > > * Engine access is sort of a mixed opinion, although if you take off the counter top (no tools required) and the cabinetry face (some tools required), then you have loads of access. The back of the engine, accessed from the starboard locker after removing gear and panels, is tight.
          > >
          > > * I found my Perko battery switch felt "odd" and when I took of the access panel behind it, it literally fell apart in 50+ pieces. Fortunately I did NOT fry my alternator, and while it is a cheap and easy fix you should take a look at it.
          > >
          > > * The factory Beckson portlights are not popular on this group, and many have replaced them. Others have looked at that price tag and bought a jib instead. Mine leak, and new covers/screens/ gaskets run close to $100 per window.
          > >
          > > * I have a scan of the Sabre owner's manual if that would help you any.
          > >
          > > Other boats to consider are the Ericson 35 MK II (solid hull like the Sabre) and late 70's early 80's C&C 34's (although they are cored hulls).
          > >
          > > Good luck with the search -- and write back when you've looked!
          > >
          > > Harry
          > > Rantum Scoot
          > > '79 S34-I #063
          > > Luce Creek, Annapolis
          > >
          > >
          > > ----- Original Message -----
          > > From: yamiracer
          > > To: Sabresailboat@ yahoogroups. com
          > > Sent: Fri 02 Oct 2009 11:20
          > > Subject: [SabreSailboat] sabre 34 info sought
          > >
          > >
          > > hi all,
          > >
          > > i currently sail a pearson 28, and am getting ready to move to a slightly larger boat. sabre 34-1 boats are on the short list (along with tartan 33, beneteau 345, pearson 10m, hunter 33, pearson 32, bristol 35.5, and a few others).
          > >
          > > i'm looking for any issues current or past owners have had, things you love/hate about the boat, etc. also, centerboard vs. non-centerboard performance. my primary concern with the boat is shared with all high aspect main/big genoa boats of the late 70's/early 80's. namely sailing performance under main alone and managing a (for me anyway) very large genoa. i like fall/spring sailing (when the wind blows), and sail area management in heavy weather is a big, big issue for me. this is one of the reasons i am attracted to the tartan 33. however, the tartan's cored hull and quirky interior are somewhat off-putting.
          > >
          > > i'm getting ready to go see acouple sabre 34's, so any and all input will be genuinely appreciated.
          > >
          > > best regards,
          > >
          > > rw
          > >
          >
        • Bill Blalock
          Another good tool for loosening a stuck centerboard is a hand saw. A cross cut or rip saw works wonders cutting out barnacles, oysters, and mussels from the
          Message 4 of 16 , Oct 3, 2009
            Another good tool for loosening a stuck centerboard is a hand saw.  A cross cut or rip saw works wonders cutting out barnacles, oysters, and mussels from the narrow gap between the board and trunk.  Surfer Girl has a handsaw wrapped in an oil cloth as part of her permanent tool kit.

            Bill B S38 mk1 k/cb

            On Sat, Oct 3, 2009 at 9:17 PM, josrulz_2001 <josrulz_2001@...> wrote:
             

            Thanks for all the info re: centerboard cranks. I'll check it next time I dive on the boat or certainly when I haul out. That'll be the only way to find out--look at it....

            --- In Sabresailboat@yahoogroups.com, john kalinowski <sabre32sailor@...> wrote:
            >
            > I have a 32 and it takes 56 cranks from top to bottom
            >  
            > 12-13 sounds wrong as that would mean you need 4x the power since you do not have the leverage.  May want to perform a full check at next haulout.  If you are not getting it all the way down, you are pretty some nasty loads on the cable and it will cause it to part if you are one who does not mind slamming to weather in big seas..
            >  
            > john
            >
            > --- On Fri, 10/2/09, josrulz_2001 <josrulz_2001@...> wrote:
            >
            >
            > From: josrulz_2001 <josrulz_2001@...>
            > Subject: [SabreSailboat] Re: sabre 34 info sought
            > To: Sabresailboat@yahoogroups.com
            > Date: Friday, October 2, 2009, 1:24 PM
            >
            >
            >  
            >
            >
            >
            > I'll second much of what Harry said. We have the Keel/CB model, also on the Chesapeake, and also easily track on the GPS with 90 degree tacks, if not narrower. I'm very happy with upwind performance, and love the shoal draft.
            >
            > Harry, you mentioned 40 cranks to lower the centerboard. Mine is about 13-14. For those familiar with various 34-Is, were there different CB crank versions over the years? I'm pretty sure our cable wouldn't even be long enough for 40 cranks.
            >
            > Thanks,
            > Jim
            >
            > --- In Sabresailboat@ yahoogroups. com, "Harry" <HarryK@> wrote:
            > >
            > > I'm a recent (June 09) owner of a 34-I, and have been through many of the issues you've asked. If the search feature worked, you could find many answers to this question. A somewhat effective answer to searching the history is to use Google, and use this search syntax:
            > > search term words site:http://groups. yahoo.com/ group/Sabresailb oat/
            > > and Google will search within this group. Awkward, but until Yahoo fixes it, it helps.
            > > A few comments. I do race as crew on a variety of performance boats, and race my Lightning, so I did want a boat that had some performance. I think the Sabre provides that performance in a boat that is fun and comfortable to sail.
            > >
            > > * Mine is a C/B. Getting the board up and down couldn't be easier -- it's 40 low-effort cranks each way. My boat had a very deteriorated cable, and the yard wouldn't let me do the replacement (insurance wouldn't let me on the boat when it was in the lift, which it had to be to do the job) and so they quoted me $500 to replace a $20 cable. The actual bill was $1000, which while it really pissed me off was no surprise. It's just a maintenance item, but be aware of it. If I'm closer than about 70 degrees, I put the board down. With the board down, I find tracking to be great, and she tacks through 90 degrees -- what more could I want? On the Chesapeake, the C/B (or a low draft boat) were high on my list of desirable features.
            > >
            > > * I've hit 6+ by GPS when beating, and done 7.3 dead down with the jib poled out. Not bad for 34 feet.
            > >
            > > * My cabin sole is rotted. It happens to many, and I'm sure it factored into the asking (and the offered!) price. Google Early Light for some photo documentation of a Sabre 34 sole replacement (and many other outstanding projects!).
            > >
            > > * The mast step is an Achillies Heel. Not sure if mine is good or bad. They take on water and rot, which is apparently an expensive fix (mast has to come out, and the sole is in the way).
            > >
            > > * Many of these MK 1 had Volvo diesels. They work fine if they work, but are VERY expensive to fix. Some parts (manifold I believe is one) are enough to make people seriously consider repowering. A rebuild kit (not counting labor) also has that result. Most Volvo's are raw water cooled, but mine has add-on (but Volvo approved) conversion.
            > >
            > > * I have darkening on the knees for my chainplates (water infiltration and/or damage). The surveyor missed this, so I have no "professional opinion" about their integrity -- I'd recommend removing the covers and examining all six of them before an offer and before you even pay for a surveyor.
            > >
            > > * I believe that the MK1 came standard with self tailing primaries, a major plus for short handed sailing especially with the big jib. The jib sure is big, and the main sure is small, and the mast sure is tall. Mine has the Lewmar 44 factory upgrade -- I think the 42 was standard. I have yet to reef the jib (I hate reefing a roller furler!), but I have had no problem trimming in (albeit slowly) the jib in rail-down weather. I have reefed the main, which is easy if not overly meaningful.
            > >
            > > * Never sailed main alone yet, although I did a short passage last weekend jib alone, and we crept up on close hauled a few times with no real problems.
            > >
            > > * I actually like the boom. It's high enough (and short enough) to be out of the way (good safety feature for inexperience crew), and at the same time it isn't way off the cabin top and hard to furl. Another boat on my short list was the Ericson 35 MK II, and the boom on that was ridiculously high.
            > >
            > > * The cockpit is nice, although a touch small (I liked the Ericson cockpit much more!). The well around the wheel is not big enough to easily get around the wheel, but the flip side (from people with models with a wider opening) is that I can actually lay down or sleep on my cockpit seats.
            > >
            > > * The cabin top traveler, while theoretically a performance hit, sure is nice.
            > >
            > > * There were a few changes in the MK1 line to be aware of. The storage over the settee's on mine is open shelves and while laminate sliders, while newer ones have very nice wood systems. Newer boats have a third opening portlight just aft of the mast (although they all have a mid-cabin hatch which is a major plus). Newer boats have a crash bar in front of the stove (a survey ding I'm wrestling with an attractive solution for.) Newer boats (maybe newer than the MK1 line) have proper lockers for the CNG tank.
            > >
            > > * At least as early as #63 ('79) they had breakers instead of fuses, a plus. Don't know if that was all the way to hull #1 or not. Factory wiring, while it has kept my boat running for 30 years, is certainly not "heavy duty" -- my entire house panel is fed by a single #10 wire.
            > >
            > > * I find the galley to work well, with the double sink and the peninsula a plus. The storage so far seems good, but we are still adding goodies to the inventory. The ice box is under insulated (just what is the "R" value of 1" plywood?!). The fact that the companionway ladder is part of the galley worksurface is a bit of a gross thought, but it does make for better use of space.
            > >
            > > * Engine access is sort of a mixed opinion, although if you take off the counter top (no tools required) and the cabinetry face (some tools required), then you have loads of access. The back of the engine, accessed from the starboard locker after removing gear and panels, is tight.
            > >
            > > * I found my Perko battery switch felt "odd" and when I took of the access panel behind it, it literally fell apart in 50+ pieces. Fortunately I did NOT fry my alternator, and while it is a cheap and easy fix you should take a look at it.
            > >
            > > * The factory Beckson portlights are not popular on this group, and many have replaced them. Others have looked at that price tag and bought a jib instead. Mine leak, and new covers/screens/ gaskets run close to $100 per window.
            > >
            > > * I have a scan of the Sabre owner's manual if that would help you any.
            > >
            > > Other boats to consider are the Ericson 35 MK II (solid hull like the Sabre) and late 70's early 80's C&C 34's (although they are cored hulls).
            > >
            > > Good luck with the search -- and write back when you've looked!
            > >
            > > Harry
            > > Rantum Scoot
            > > '79 S34-I #063
            > > Luce Creek, Annapolis


            > >
            > >
            > > ----- Original Message -----
            > > From: yamiracer
            > > To: Sabresailboat@ yahoogroups. com
            > > Sent: Fri 02 Oct 2009 11:20
            > > Subject: [SabreSailboat] sabre 34 info sought
            > >
            > >
            > > hi all,
            > >
            > > i currently sail a pearson 28, and am getting ready to move to a slightly larger boat. sabre 34-1 boats are on the short list (along with tartan 33, beneteau 345, pearson 10m, hunter 33, pearson 32, bristol 35.5, and a few others).
            > >
            > > i'm looking for any issues current or past owners have had, things you love/hate about the boat, etc. also, centerboard vs. non-centerboard performance. my primary concern with the boat is shared with all high aspect main/big genoa boats of the late 70's/early 80's. namely sailing performance under main alone and managing a (for me anyway) very large genoa. i like fall/spring sailing (when the wind blows), and sail area management in heavy weather is a big, big issue for me. this is one of the reasons i am attracted to the tartan 33. however, the tartan's cored hull and quirky interior are somewhat off-putting.
            > >
            > > i'm getting ready to go see acouple sabre 34's, so any and all input will be genuinely appreciated.
            > >
            > > best regards,
            > >
            > > rw
            > >
            >


          • bennettkaufman99
            ... I use a 4-foot steel ruler--about 1/8 inch thick and 2 inches wide--to clear the crud from the board when it s stuck up in the well; it fits nicely between
            Message 5 of 16 , Oct 3, 2009
              >>Another good tool for loosening a stuck centerboard is a hand saw. A >>cross cut or rip saw works wonders cutting out barnacles, oysters, >>and mussels from the narrow gap between the board and trunk.

              I use a 4-foot steel ruler--about 1/8 inch thick and 2 inches wide--to clear the crud from the board when it's stuck up in the well; it fits nicely between the board and the centerboard well, and is long enough to get all the way up into the well. BTW, I need to crank the centerboard winch on my S36 about 42 times to lower the board all the way...this agrees with the instructions in the owner's manual.

              ben kaufman, CARACOL (S36 #52)
            • stebenb9567
              It may be unique to the model, & it took awhile to figure out, but my S38-1 has a cap nut in the bilge over the CB trunk. Inside a locker, I also found a long
              Message 6 of 16 , Oct 4, 2009
                It may be unique to the model, & it took awhile to figure out, but my S38-1 has a cap nut in the bilge over the CB trunk. Inside a locker, I also found a long rod inside a length of hose. The hose seems intended to fit over the inrush of water when the cap nut is removed & is long enough for the upper end to be above the waterline thereby stopping the flood. Then apparently the rod is inserted down thru the hose to push free the centerboard. Fortunately have never had to use it.

                Steve
                Wind Rush II

                --- In Sabresailboat@yahoogroups.com, "bennettkaufman99" <kaufmanb@...> wrote:
                >
                > >>Another good tool for loosening a stuck centerboard is a hand saw. A >>cross cut or rip saw works wonders cutting out barnacles, oysters, >>and mussels from the narrow gap between the board and trunk.
                >
                > I use a 4-foot steel ruler--about 1/8 inch thick and 2 inches wide--to clear the crud from the board when it's stuck up in the well; it fits nicely between the board and the centerboard well, and is long enough to get all the way up into the well. BTW, I need to crank the centerboard winch on my S36 about 42 times to lower the board all the way...this agrees with the instructions in the owner's manual.
                >
                > ben kaufman, CARACOL (S36 #52)
                >
              • Al Lorman
                My 32 k/cb had the same arrangement. Al Lorman Sent from my Verizon Wireless BlackBerry ... From: stebenb9567 Date: Sun, 04 Oct 2009
                Message 7 of 16 , Oct 4, 2009
                  My 32 k/cb had the same arrangement.

                  Al Lorman

                  Sent from my Verizon Wireless BlackBerry


                  From: "stebenb9567" <stebenb9567@...>
                  Date: Sun, 04 Oct 2009 19:14:41 -0000
                  To: <Sabresailboat@yahoogroups.com>
                  Subject: [SabreSailboat] Re: sabre 34 info sought

                   

                  It may be unique to the model, & it took awhile to figure out, but my S38-1 has a cap nut in the bilge over the CB trunk. Inside a locker, I also found a long rod inside a length of hose. The hose seems intended to fit over the inrush of water when the cap nut is removed & is long enough for the upper end to be above the waterline thereby stopping the flood. Then apparently the rod is inserted down thru the hose to push free the centerboard. Fortunately have never had to use it.

                  Steve
                  Wind Rush II

                  --- In Sabresailboat@ yahoogroups. com, "bennettkaufman99" <kaufmanb@.. .> wrote:
                  >
                  > >>Another good tool for loosening a stuck centerboard is a hand saw. A >>cross cut or rip saw works wonders cutting out barnacles, oysters, >>and mussels from the narrow gap between the board and trunk.
                  >
                  > I use a 4-foot steel ruler--about 1/8 inch thick and 2 inches wide--to clear the crud from the board when it's stuck up in the well; it fits nicely between the board and the centerboard well, and is long enough to get all the way up into the well. BTW, I need to crank the centerboard winch on my S36 about 42 times to lower the board all the way...this agrees with the instructions in the owner's manual.
                  >
                  > ben kaufman, CARACOL (S36 #52)
                  >

                • Barry Dwyer
                  RW, I agree with Alan s comments. Another great day of sailing on my 78 34 mk1. I was by myself, double reef and the 110% jib in 15-20 knts and had a blast.
                  Message 8 of 16 , Oct 4, 2009

                    RW, I agree with Alan’s comments.  Another great day of sailing on my ’78 34 mk1.  I was by myself, double reef and the 110% jib in 15-20 knts and had a blast. 

                     

                    The slip next to me is home to a very nice Bristol 31.1.  It spent 7 years indoors at the factory after being sold and has every gadget know to man.  Beautiful condition, teak decks, radar, AC, heat, 800 engine hours.  The owner told me he is selling it and moving to a Cat as his wife doesn’t like to heel.  $69k.  He said it was on www.yachtworld.com

                     

                     


                    From: Sabresailboat@yahoogroups.com [mailto: Sabresailboat@yahoogroups.com ] On Behalf Of artherrien
                    Sent: Saturday, October 03, 2009 2:04 PM
                    To: Sabresailboat@yahoogroups.com
                    Subject: [SabreSailboat] Re: sabre 34 info sought

                     

                     

                    rw,

                    If you sail the Sabre 34 Mk I, you'll likely fall in love with it. My wife and I were out last Fri (9/25) in a steady 25 mph wind, with significant gusts. I had the main sail reefed to the first reef point, and the genoa at about 100%. The boat was steady as a rock, and we kept about 6.4 mph SOG close hauled.

                    Check out this web site to compare boat "Comfort Factors" and "Capsize Ratios". http://www.image- ination.com/ sailcalc. html

                    I think you'll find the Sabre 34 compares well to all the others you have listed (I might be a bit biased :-)) The Bristol 35.5 is perhaps a bit more stable in rough weather, but the price difference might be significant.

                    Good luck hunting.

                    Alan T

                    --- In Sabresailboat@ yahoogroups. com, "yamiracer" <yamiracer@. ..> wrote:

                    >
                    > hi all,
                    >
                    > i currently sail a pearson 28, and am getting ready to move to a slightly
                    larger boat. sabre 34-1 boats are on the short list (along with tartan 33, beneteau 345, pearson 10m, hunter 33, pearson 32, bristol 35.5, and a few others).
                    >
                    > i'm looking for any issues current or past owners have had, things you
                    love/hate about the boat, etc. also, centerboard vs. non-centerboard performance. my primary concern with the boat is shared with all high aspect main/big genoa boats of the late 70's/early 80's. namely sailing performance under main alone and managing a (for me anyway) very large genoa. i like fall/spring sailing (when the wind blows), and sail area management in heavy weather is a big, big issue for me. this is one of the reasons i am attracted to the tartan 33. however, the tartan's cored hull and quirky interior are somewhat off-putting.
                    >
                    > i'm getting ready to go see acouple sabre 34's, so any and all input will
                    be genuinely appreciated.
                    >
                    > best regards,
                    >
                    > rw
                    >

                  • Godwin Jones
                        I have the same push rod and likewise have never used it.  I have avoided barnacles sticking the board by always backing off 2-3 turns after raising. 
                    Message 9 of 16 , Oct 4, 2009
                          I have the same push rod and likewise have never used it.  I have avoided barnacles sticking the board by always backing off 2-3 turns after raising.  That way if it does not go down under its own weight, I crank up 2 turns to free it and then gravity takes it down.  40 turns gets mine from full down to full up.
                       
                      Godwin
                      Bojangels S-34-II
                      .........._/)
                      ~~~~~~~~~~~


                      From: stebenb9567 <stebenb9567@...>
                      To: Sabresailboat@yahoogroups.com
                      Sent: Sunday, October 4, 2009 3:14:41 PM
                      Subject: [SabreSailboat] Re: sabre 34 info sought

                       

                      It may be unique to the model, & it took awhile to figure out, but my S38-1 has a cap nut in the bilge over the CB trunk. Inside a locker, I also found a long rod inside a length of hose. The hose seems intended to fit over the inrush of water when the cap nut is removed & is long enough for the upper end to be above the waterline thereby stopping the flood. Then apparently the rod is inserted down thru the hose to push free the centerboard. Fortunately have never had to use it.

                      Steve
                      Wind Rush II

                      --- In Sabresailboat@ yahoogroups. com, "bennettkaufman99" <kaufmanb@.. .> wrote:
                      >
                      > >>Another good tool for loosening a stuck centerboard is a hand saw. A >>cross cut or rip saw works wonders cutting out barnacles, oysters, >>and mussels from the narrow gap between the board and trunk.
                      >
                      > I use a 4-foot steel ruler--about 1/8 inch thick and 2 inches wide--to clear the crud from the board when it's stuck up in the well; it fits nicely between the board and the centerboard well, and is long enough to get all the way up into the well. BTW, I need to crank the centerboard winch on my S36 about 42 times to lower the board all the way...this agrees with the instructions in the owner's manual.
                      >
                      > ben kaufman, CARACOL (S36 #52)
                      >


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