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Re: propeller shaft

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  • followingsea2001
    Things are expensive here in SF Bay area. We paid $2,000 to have the shaft cut out(old bronze one was scored) new stainless shaft machined with new coupling
    Message 1 of 42 , Jan 31, 2008
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      Things are expensive here in SF Bay area. We paid $2,000 to have the
      shaft cut out(old bronze one was scored) new stainless shaft
      machined with new coupling and PYI dripless and new cutless
      installed. Part of the expense was removing, and replacing the
      Maxprop which requires dissasemby. There is no way I would have
      attempted this by myself.
      If you replace the bronze shaft keep it and give it to someone who
      works with bronze. That stuff is pricey thsee days.

      Martin
      Kokopelli S34II

      --- In Sabresailboat@yahoogroups.com, "vanbeckump" <vanbeckump@...>
      wrote:
      >
      > The yard is quoting me a dripless stuffing box. A days labor plus
      > parts they say. Does that sound right?
      >
      > They warn that the bronze shaft may be damaged and need
      replacement.
      > If so they would want to replace it with stainless at around
      $1,000.
      > They say it would have to be completely machined out of thicker
      stock.
      > I am wondering why one can't use one inch rod stock and just
      machine
      > the prop end fitting.
      >
      > What are the advantages/disadvantages of stainless vs bronze?
      >
      > Should I do this job myself?
      >
      > Petr Van Beckum
      > S-30 MK3 "Airborne"
      > Noank, CT
      >
    • sid wax
      Come to think of it, Dave, your observation seems accurate: the recess was more of a problem then the clearance. There is probably at least 2 inches of space
      Message 42 of 42 , Feb 12, 2008
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        Come to think of it, Dave, your observation seems accurate: the
        recess was more of a problem then the clearance. There is probably
        at least 2 inches of space in there, which would be enough to hold a
        piece of pipe, but a socket was too short to hold in place with my
        fingers while I slid the shaft forward to hold it, especially with
        that indentation. a short pipe nipple mighe have done the trick. The
        long metric bolts were just one more complication.

        Actually, how about if you took a short pipe nipple, and drilled and
        threaded a hole in the side? Then one could get the pipe into place,
        and put hold it in place with a machine screw from the side while you
        snug it down. I might try that if I have to get the damned thing
        apart again.

        --- In Sabresailboat@yahoogroups.com, Dave Lochner <davelochner@...>
        wrote:
        >
        > Peter,
        >
        > On the MD7A the flange has a deep recess, such that the there is
        > about an inch or so between the end of the shaft and the
        transmission.
        >
        > I attempted a variation of this method, using a socket instead of
        a
        > piece of pipe, but it was difficult to hold the socket in position
        > and get the bolts started, etc. So I resorted to the hammer, which
        > worked. Had I used a 2.5 inch piece of 1/2" pipe, it probably
        would
        > have worked like a charm, but it would have necessitated a trip to
        > the hardware store for the pipe and long bolts that are metric
        thread.
        >
        > With that experience, I'd suggest the tapping and PB Blaster
        first,
        > if that doesn't work, then take the trip to store and buy some
        pipe
        > and longer bolts. And then go with the destructive methods.
        >
        > Even pressure on the transmission probably won't hurt it, its not
        > much different than having the prop push the boat.
        >
        > Dave
        >
        >
        > On Feb 11, 2008, at 8:50 AM, vanbeckump wrote:
        >
        > > I was reading in Nigel Calder last night and he suggested
        decoupling
        > > the flanges, inserting a short piece of pipe (smaller in OD than
        the
        > > OD of the shaft) in between the two flanges and re-tightening so
        that
        > > the pipe forces the shaft out as the flanges are drawn together.
        > >
        > > With PB, heat and light rapping this sounds plausable.
        > >
        > > Has anyone tried it?
        > >
        > > Peter Van Beckum
        > >
        > > --- In Sabresailboat@yahoogroups.com, "followingsea2001"
        > > <mnthomas@> wrote:
        > > >
        > > > We used Berkeley Marine to remove the shaft and they
        specifically
        > > > ruled out using a slide due to risk of damage. When the flange
        did
        > > > not yeild to soaking in PB blaster they cut the flange with a
        > > cutting
        > > > wheel right on top of the key. once cut through, two whacks
        with a
        > > > hammer on a cold chisel and she was free with no damage to
        shaft.
        > > > Adds the cost of a new flange but saved that amount in labor
        not to
        > > > mention possible damage to tranny.
        > > >
        > > > Martin
        > > > Kokopelli
        > > >
        > > > --- In Sabresailboat@yahoogroups.com, Dave Lochner
        <davelochner@>
        > > > wrote:
        > > > >
        > > > > Peter,
        > > > >
        > > > > I'm not certain if you can trust them, but, let's weigh the
        > > options.
        > > > >
        > > > > Attempt the easiest way to remove the flange, lots of PB
        Blaster,
        > > > some
        > > > > time, moderate heat (heating gun) and some persuasion with a
        > > > hammer.
        > > > > If that doesn't work, 30 minutes with a hack saw or somewhat
        less
        > > > time
        > > > > with a dremel tool and carbide blade. Replacement cost for a
        new
        > > > SS
        > > > > shaft ~$250.
        > > > >
        > > > > The yard method: 2-3 hours at $80/hour and maybe the shaft is
        > > > still
        > > > > good, maybe not. Maybe the transmission is damaged, maybe not.
        > > > Cost
        > > > > $240 for labor, and maybe a new shaft ~$250, and in the worst
        case
        > > > > scenario, a new or rebuilt transmission. $???????
        > > > >
        > > > > Admittedly, my boat is a freshwater boat, but it only took
        about
        > > > 10
        > > > > minutes of me tapping the flange with a hammer while Susan
        held
        > > > onto
        > > > > the prop to remove the flange.
        > > > >
        > > > > Dave
        > > > >
        > > > >
        > > > > On Feb 9, 2008, at 2:19 PM, vanbeckump wrote:
        > > > >
        > > > > > The yard has an interesting way of removing the flange from
        the
        > > > shaft.
        > > > > > They loosen the set screws etc on the flange, then they
        take the
        > > > prop
        > > > > > off and thread a custom made long rod "shaft puller" onto
        the
        > > end
        > > > of
        > > > > > the shaft. The shaft puller has a heavy sliding collar on
        it
        > > that
        > > > > > comes up hard against a stop at the far end. Apparently
        enough
        > > > > > banging on this pulls the shaft from the coupling.
        > > > > >
        > > > > > My big question is...can this be good for the transmission?
        They
        > > > say
        > > > > > "no problem" but then it isn't their transmission.
        > > > > >
        > > > > > They also warn that removing the propeller can be damaging
        to
        > > the
        > > > > > shaft. As in all boat work I brace myself for the worse
        possible
        > > > > > scenario but am I nuts to trust them?
        > > > > >
        > > > > > Peter Van Beckum
        > > > > > S30 MK3 "Airborne"
        > > > > > Noank, CT
        > > > > >
        > > > > > --- In Sabresailboat@yahoogroups.com, sid wax <sid_w@>
        wrote:
        > > > > > >
        > > > > > > http://www.deepblueyachtsupply.com/Login.aspx
        > > > > > >
        > > > > > > Deep blue Yacht supply will sell you everything you need
        for
        > > > less
        > > > > > than $500 in parts including a custom fit prop shaft. You
        can
        > > cut
        > > > off
        > > > > > the old shaft and toss it (I used a Dremel tool, after
        weeks of
        > > > > > banging away and the trying to figure out how to get it
        out
        > > of the
        > > > > > flange Took about 1/2 hour in the end).
        > > > > > >
        > > > > > > It cost me about a half day labor for the yard to put back
        > > > > > together. That was with a new prop. I don't know if the
        yard
        > > will
        > > > > > let you provide your own parts, though.
        > > > > > >
        > > > > > > vanbeckump <vanbeckump@> wrote:
        > > > > > > Thanks to all again. I think that using my newfound
        > > > > > knowledge I will
        > > > > > > negotiate with the yard. I may end up doing this myself
        but I
        > > > need
        > > > > > to
        > > > > > > be careful about where I apply my time.
        > > > > > >
        > > > > > > Peter Van Beckum
        > > > > > >
        > > > > > > --- In Sabresailboat@yahoogroups.com, "Eric" <sabre30_36@>
        > > > wrote:
        > > > > > > >
        > > > > > > > One inch stock should be readily available. It would
        likely
        > > > need
        > > > > > to
        > > > > > > > be cut to length but I can't imagine they would need to
        > > > machine
        > > > > > it to
        > > > > > > > match the one inch diameter. Sounds very odd to me.
        > > > > > > >
        > > > > > > > Eric
        > > > > > > > Sabre 30 #36 "Spirit"
        > > > > > > > West River, MD
        > > > > > > >
        > > > > > > > --- In Sabresailboat@yahoogroups.com, "vanbeckump"
        > > > <vanbeckump@>
        > > > > > wrote:
        > > > > > > > >
        > > > > > > > > The yard is quoting me a dripless stuffing box. A days
        > > > labor
        > > > > > plus
        > > > > > > > > parts they say. Does that sound right?
        > > > > > > > >
        > > > > > > > > They warn that the bronze shaft may be damaged and
        need
        > > > > > replacement.
        > > > > > > > > If so they would want to replace it with stainless
        at
        > > around
        > > > > > $1,000.
        > > > > > > > > They say it would have to be completely machined out
        of
        > > > thicker
        > > > > > stock.
        > > > > > > > > I am wondering why one can't use one inch rod stock
        and
        > > > just
        > > > > > machine
        > > > > > > > > the prop end fitting.
        > > > > > > > >
        > > > > > > > > What are the advantages/disadvantages of stainless vs
        > > > bronze?
        > > > > > > > >
        > > > > > > > > Should I do this job myself?
        > > > > > > > >
        > > > > > > > > Petr Van Beckum
        > > > > > > > > S-30 MK3 "Airborne"
        > > > > > > > > Noank, CT
        > > > > > > > >
        > > > > > > >
        > > > > > >
        > > > > >
        > > > > >
        > > > > >
        > > > >
        > > >
        > >
        > >
        > >
        >
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