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40775Re: Jib Sheets

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  • sailor11767
    Dec 5, 2012
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      Two good knots that allow either end to pull on the loop are the figure 8 loop (I've never used it, but climbers seem to swear by it) and the alpine butterfly (which is easier to tie if you aren't tying it around something!).

      http://www.animatedknots.com/alpinebutterfly/index.php?Categ=climbing&LogoImage=LogoGrog.jpg&Website=www.animatedknots.com

      Neither approach is much smaller with regard to the knot than a bowline, but both use less line, weigh less, and don't have ends laying about.

      Harry



      --- In Sabresailboat@yahoogroups.com, Dave Lochner <davelochner@...> wrote:
      >
      > I've used this method for a number of years, without any problems, including a couple times that I really screwed up a tack and had the sail flog for far too long.
      >
      > One way to limit slippage might be to put a seizing line around the two tails of the sheet where it exits the loop. Sewing them together might help. It wouldn't take too long and would be easy to cut way if the sail needed to come down.
      >
      > Dave
      >
      >
      > On Dec 4, 2012, at 10:56 PM, David Laino wrote:
      >
      > >
      > > Dave,
      > >
      > > I tried this method of jibsheet attachment several years back in a new line on a previous boat. Then one day while out in heavy winds (and likely some bad tacks that flogged the jib) I discovered I had a port jibsheet nearly twice as long as the starboard - the knot had slipped. I was left wondering, there must be a more secure knot to use in this configuration. I didn't know what knot that was so I ended up cutting the line into two separate sheets and tying bowlines in each.
      > >
      > > If anyone has a better knot for this jibsheet arrangement I would like to know what that is since it otherwise seems a promising approach for lightening the sheet knots for light air.
      > >
      > > David
      > > 38 MKII
      > >
      > > On Dec 4, 2012, at 7:43 PM, Dave Lochner <davelochner@...> wrote:
      > >
      > >> Rich,
      > >>
      > >> I'll try. It is much easier to show a photo, but I don't have one.
      > >>
      > >> Double the line to find the mid point, sort of like this: ===) Take the midpoint and push it through the clew. Then take the ends and pull them through the bight formed by the line going through the clew. Pull the lines tight, one end goes to port, one to starboard.
      > >>
      > >> Here's a bad picture using a piece of cord and a pair of scissors. Should give you the idea.
      > >>
      > >> <Photo on 12-4-12 at 7.34 PM #2.jpg>
      > >>
      > >> It saves weight because you only use a few inches of line, whereas, each bowline tied as small as you can still uses about a foot of line. That extra weight in light air will weigh the clew down.
      > >>
      > >> Dave
      > >>
      > >>
      > >> On Dec 4, 2012, at 7:14 PM, sailaway0608 wrote:
      > >>
      > >>>
      > >>> Dave,
      > >>>
      > >>> Could you expand on this for me. Are you saying one length running from one side of the boat, thru the clew, and then to the other side???
      > >>>
      > >>> I frequently suffer from the "knot in the shrouds" or KITS, especially on light air days.
      > >>>
      > >>> "Finally, especially if he has roller furling, get one long length rather than 2 short lengths. With one long length the sheet can be looped through the jib clew reducing weight on the clew and eliminating the knot that tends to hang up on shrouds when tacking."
      > >>>
      > >>> Rich
      > >>> 1986 Sabre 36
      > >>> Lake Champlain, VT
      > >>>
      > >>
      > >
      > >
      >
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