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23174Re: Attention gearheads

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  • workshoe99
    Dec 1, 2009
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      Peter,

      Last winter when I was still trying to "save" our W33, I sent the injectors out for a bench test at $75 a pop. At that time I was made to understand that an injector shop could replace the barrels and use new shims ($15=/-) to get them into a "rebuilt" condition. I was able to get all four injectors tested and "reconditioned" for $325 if my mind serves me right. I know I did not have to spend the $425 x 4 that new injectors would have run. Our problem turned out to be scoring on the #4 cylinder wall. You probably remember that as I posted the sad story here last year and that we now have a new 3TJH4E Yanmar down below. I hope you do not have to go that route. Because I did and I am now $16K lighter in the cruising kitty, I am writing from New Orleans where I am working instead of cruising this winter. Pooh! At least I am ashore with the rest of you instead of writing about the warm waters and wonderful anchorages in Mexico this winter!

      Jan S38 Mk I #41 "Capriccio" Mazatlan, Mex.

      --- In Sabresailboat@yahoogroups.com, Peter Tollini <pete@...> wrote:
      >
      > Guys -
      > Thanks for the responses. It has a new fuel tank, and fresh racor
      > (w/spacer), lift pump and injector pump filters. It will rev to 2500 (3000
      > is governor tops) in neutral, still w/ lots of black smoke. Starting is a
      > lot of cranking, with tons of black smoke prior to eventually running. My
      > semi-educated guess is an injector or two not closing completely. That
      > would sure equal excess fuel. The good news is that Baltimore Diesel Service
      > tests and rebuilds all types of injectors, including small marine
      > diesels with a one-day turnaround for <$100 per injector. I got that tidbit
      > from a local farmer. (They get real irritable waiting combine parts this
      > time of year) New injector from W is $475. Makes Mercedes parts cheap by
      > comparison!
      > I will check to make sure that Mickey & Minnie have not shacked up in the
      > air inlet, though.
      > Pete
      >
      > On Tue, Dec 1, 2009 at 1:01 PM, Leonard Bertaux <lbertaux@...>wrote:
      >
      > >
      > >
      > > Peter
      > >
      > > The following describes general diagnostic indications from various colour
      > > exhausts:
      > >
      > > "1. EXCESSIVE EXHAUST SMOKE
      > > Excessive diesel smoke is due to incomplete combustion, normally caused by
      > > faulty injection system or other engine troubles. A small amount of exhaust
      > > smoke is normal during initial start-up or rapid acceleration.
      > > Type of Smoke
      > > Abnormal Exhaust smoke may be black, white or blue. Each type of smoke
      > > indicates engine problems and these are discussed below:
      > >
      > > Black Smoke
      > >
      > > Excessive black smoke is caused by a rich air-fuel mixture. This may result
      > > form problems with the injection pump or infection timing, which may in turn
      > > be clue to a choked air cleaner, worn fuel injectors, adulterated diesel
      > > fuel or the engine itself.
      > >
      > > White Smoke
      > >
      > > White smoke occurs mainly during cold starts, when the fuel tends to
      > > condense into liquid and does not burn due to cold engine parts. The most
      > > common reason for white smoke are in-operative glow plugs low engine
      > > compression, a bad injector spray pattern, late injection timing or
      > > injection pump problems.
      > >
      > > Blue Smoke
      > >
      > > Excessive blue smoke indicates problems from low engine compression and/or
      > > worn piston rings, scored cylinder walls or leaking valve stem seals The
      > > blue smoke is caused by crankcase oil entering the combustion chamber and
      > > being emitted after partial combustion through the exhaust"
      > >
      > > Len
      > > s/v Walkabout
      > > S38 MKII
      > >
      > >
      > > On Dec 1, 2009, at 11:10 AM, Jim Starkey wrote:
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > > Peter Tollini wrote:
      > > >
      > > >
      > > > After a miserable summer and fall of non-sailing due to illnesses,
      > > > weather and life in general, I found my W18 increasingly tough to
      > > > start, with lots of cranking and black smoke. When I got out, it
      > > > wouldn't rev over 1500 and was pushing out plumes of black smoke. I'm
      > > > thinking dirty/leaky injectors. Any other thoughts or sugggestions?
      > >
      > > Black smoke means one of two things: Either incomplete combustion or a
      > > pope hasn't been elected. Assuming you're not sailing the Sistine
      > > Chapel, lets assume the former.
      > >
      > > You might check your air filter. Blockage would explain all your
      > > symptoms. Besides, checking cheaps things first is always a good strategy.
      > >
      > > I had plenty of experience with clogged fuel filters during the Racor
      > > switcheroo. On a W27, the engine would develop full power, then
      > > gradually lose RPM, and eventually die. Fifteen minutes later, it would
      > > be willing to run again as fuel osmosed through the filter. That
      > > doesn't sound at all like what you've got.
      > >
      > > Water in the fuel is highly unlikely unless your Racor is saturated, and
      > > then it would probably kill the engine after destroying the injector pump.
      > >
      > > I also could be a dead cylinder due to low compression. A compression
      > > check is also cheap and will probably yield good news, at least from the
      > > wallet perspective.
      > >
      > > --
      > > Jim Starkey
      > > Founder, NimbusDB, Inc.
      > > 978 526-1376
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      >
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