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Yellow-throated Vireo & Magnolia Warbler at Six Mile Cypress

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  • Vincent Lucas
    Greetings: Today s Caloosa Bird Club s fieldtrip to Six Mile Cypress Slough Preserve yielded a beautiful Yellow-throated Vireo & a first fall Magnolia Warbler
    Message 1 of 1 , Jan 28, 2002
      Greetings:

      Today's Caloosa Bird Club's fieldtrip to Six Mile Cypress Slough Preserve
      yielded a beautiful Yellow-throated Vireo & a first fall Magnolia Warbler
      in a mixed flock of warblers consisting of mostly Yellow-rumps with a
      Black-and-white, Yellow-throated and Palm. We watched the Vireo for
      several minutes as it managed to wrestle a moth cocoon (undetermined
      species) from a Bald Cypress and proceed to break it open and eat the
      pupa inside. Fascinating stuff and a great bird for our area. It would be
      difficult to say where along the boardwalk these birds could be found. My
      best advise is to find the marauding group of warblers and to (hopefully)
      find the Yellow-throated Vireo and Magnolia Warbler that way. At first,
      the Magnolia Warbler was a "mystery warbler" which I (along with everyone
      else there) could not readily identify since it was quite active and did
      not allow decent looks. Being relatively unfamiliar with the plumage of
      the bird did not help either. I did have some decent looks at the
      undertail pattern of the bird, after which, upon close scrutiny of Plates
      31 & 32 of __The Peterson Field Guide: Warblers__, by Jon Dunn & Kimball
      Garrett, (Houghton-Mifflin, 1997) could only be Magnolia Warbler. We were
      looking at a first fall female. . . .

      The sightings board at the Preserve also listed a Hairy Woodpecker as
      having been recently seen, although we did not see it. Our other "best
      birds" were male Yellow Warbler (replete with red-striping on the breast)
      -- seen by some of the club members; adult Bald Eagle flyover; a small
      group of female Hooded Mergansers; both night-herons; Pileated
      Woodpecker; Great Crested Flycatcher and Solitary Vireo.

      Good birding!

      Vincent Lucas
      Naples
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