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greetings from the UK

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  • paul matthews
    we were glad to hear that the latest hurricane gave you a wide berth this time,and hope any others do likewise.I m guessing by the lack of postings recently
    Message 1 of 5 , Jul 13, 2005
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      we were glad to hear that the latest hurricane gave you a "wide
      berth" this time,and hope any others do likewise.I'm guessing by the
      lack of postings recently that birding has gone a little quiet over in
      S.W Florida,just as it has here in the UK lately.Our Autumn migration
      gets started towards the end of this month,so hopefully a few rarities
      will soon turn up.Temperatures are up in the 80's at the moment and we
      are all melting(when we get heat its always far more humid than wev'e
      ever experienced in florida!!).We have booked our florida vacation and
      will be on Sanibel again around the end of October,early november,I
      hope theres still a few migrants left for me!I'll keep an eye on this
      site to see whats around nearer the time,and will post again to try
      and get an idea on the best sites to visit.
      Best wishes,Paul and family
    • mmullins@comcast.net
      Living on Captiva, I was very busy prepping for H. Dennis. Saturday night Still, I went to the beach by Captiva s groin and saw much activity and some terns
      Message 2 of 5 , Jul 13, 2005
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        Living on Captiva, I was very busy prepping for H. Dennis. Saturday night Still, I went to the beach by Captiva's 'groin' and saw much activity and some terns with exceptionally dark backs. They didn't look local, were not sandwich, royals or leasts.MOre the sixe of Forsters or Commons, but looked different withthe solid black backs. WIthout my bins, I coudn't ID them, but someone else may have observed them (V. MC GRath?).

        Had rather unusual looks at roseate spoonbills riding high over Captiva's houses near Blind Pass. The spoonbills are here this time of year, but stay low and in the back of the island. It was navigating the brisk winds that drove them high and created an unusual look at spoonbills from the beach.

        --
        Peace,

        Michael






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      • Charlie Ewell
        All, Sounds like it was very possible Michael Mullins had some Sooty and/or Bridled Terns related to Dennis, as they are darker backed than the terns commonly
        Message 3 of 5 , Jul 13, 2005
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          All,

          Sounds like it was very possible Michael Mullins had some Sooty and/or Bridled
          Terns related to Dennis, as they are darker backed than the terns commonly seen
          in our area!

          Back in Sept 2000 when Gordon passed offshore, we found Sooty, Bridled, and
          Brown Noddy in and around San Carlos Bay and the causeway (as well as a HUGE
          jaeger flock).

          Vince McGrath posted the following to the Flabirding list:
          *******************************************
          Subject: Storm Birds Sanibel Captiva
          From: McAvian@...
          Date: Tue, 12 Jul 2005 08:52:55 EDT

          Got out midmorning Saturday to the Sanibel Lighthouse, Least and Royal Terns
          were fishing inside San Carlos Bay and to my delight 4 Sooty Terns flew by
          heading towards the causeway. Eventually 2 more Sooty Terns flew by. So off to
          work on Captiva. Found a low spot on our defunct golf course and enjoyed
          excellent breeding plumage Greater Yellowlegs, 4 Lesser Yellowlegs, a dozen
          imm. Black-bellied Plovers, 30 or so Semipalmated plovers, breeding plumage
          Western
          (6) and Least (10) Sandpipers, 20 mostly imm. Willets, a small group of Royal
          terns with a couple of Sandwich,Least and 2 excellent breeding plumage
          Forster's Terns. Gotta love those storms, unless, of course you're in their
          path.
          McAvian AT aol.com
          Vince McGrath
          Captiva I., Fl.
          ******************************************

          (For those not aware, a great web site to keep up with the other Florida lists,
          as well as around the country and world, is Jack Siler's Birdingonthe.net at:

          http://birdingonthe.net/birdmail.html

          Just scroll down to Eastern US, and click on Birdbrains (FL), Floridabirds-L,
          Florida/Bahamas (which is the Flabirding list mentioned above), FloridaSW (this
          list), and North Florida. You can keep up with the Miami/South Florida area at
          Tropical Audubon's Birdboard at:

          http://tropicalaudubon.org/

          and click the Birdboard link at the top of the page.)

          As for Paul's note about the slower birding season during the summer, I'll use
          that as a nudge to wake me out of my teaching vacation lazy mode. While it's
          true passerine migration takes a break during June and most of July, a location
          like Little Estero Lagoon usually hosts many summering/nonbreeding shorebirds
          and nesting Least Terns. This year was no exception. I'll post a review of the
          season and update the present in a separate post. The first returning adults,
          most still in breeding plumage, were evident July 5 and right on time with their
          arrival. Bunche Beach has also begun to liven up.

          Reports are already coming in from central Florida for the early birds like
          Black-and-white Warbler and Louisiana Waterthrush. Last year Walt Winton and
          Wes Dirks had a male Cerulean Warbler at Sanibel Lighthouse at the end of July!
          Six Mile Cypress Slough Preserve is a good spot to look for July migrants, and
          it's shaded to boot!

          Charlie

          Charlie Ewell
          Arlyne Salcedo
          Cape Coral, FL
          Anhinga42@...
          SalcedoDVM@...
        • mmullins@comcast.net
          Least terns nesting on Sanibel by Clam Pass as well as snowy plovers. Area is roped off by US fish and wildlife and id d as snowy nesting area. Two L. T.
          Message 4 of 5 , Jul 13, 2005
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            Least terns nesting on Sanibel by Clam Pass as well as snowy plovers. Area is roped off by US fish and wildlife and id'd as snowy nesting area. Two L. T. chicks were looking in very precarious way. I went last night just past sunset and didn't see one of the many adults that usually harass me when I walk by. I assumed they roost right on the beach and protect their young as they do in daytime, but these 'younguns' were alone and yellow-crowned night herons prowling as well as ghost crabs. Hope they make it.

            Where do the least adults go if they don't stay with the young?

            --
            Peace,

            Michael






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          • paul matthews
            Hi all in sunny Florida,I ve made a number of postings over recent years usually regarding our regular vacations to Sanibel.This year we have decided to try
            Message 5 of 5 , Feb 28, 2008
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              Hi all in sunny Florida,I've made a number of postings over recent
              years usually regarding our regular vacations to Sanibel.This year
              we have decided to try somewhere new for a holiday,to be honest we
              have found the standard of the beaches at Sanibel to be quite poor
              recently with lots of smelly seaweed on the beach and in the
              water.We appreciate that this mostly washes in from the everglades
              but we don't remember this being as bad several years ago.
              Anyway,we've decided to try going a bit further up the coast this
              year so have booked holiday villas on longboat key for a week in
              May/June followed by a week in Homosassa.
              Does anyone have any recommendations for good bird locations in
              those areas?We particularly like family friendly reserves(like Ding
              Darling),where we can drive through and watch the wildlife,as I
              probably won't have enough time to go off "trekking" on my own.
              We stayed in Homosassa many years ago and this particular villa is
              beside a river with a nature reserve nearby so i'm particularly
              looking forward to that week.I'll definately hang some feeders up in
              the garden.What birds might I expect to use them,and what food will
              work best?
              Thanks in advance for any help and replies.
              paul
              Southampton
              UK

              www.nutbags.co.uk
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