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RE: [SWFLBirdline] Caloosahatchee Creeks count

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  • Charlie Ewell
    You re right Bob, they would be early migrants that are right on time by mid to late July. Many of the adult shorebirds that breed south of the arctic (like
    Message 1 of 2 , Jul 26, 2011
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      You’re right Bob, they would be early migrants that are right on time by mid to late July.  Many of the adult shorebirds that breed south of the arctic (like Willet, Short-billed Dowitcher, Spotted Sandpiper, etc) were already showing up a couple weeks ago.  I’d expect the arctic breeders like Red Knot, Sanderling, Ruddy Turnstone, etc are not far behind, if not arriving already.  Migration is back on!

       

      I did happen to be in downtown Ft Myers last night as sundown approached, and saw at least 50 -100 Purple Martins heading for their staging roost.  I didn’t see the actual area the roost was located.  About the same number of Chimney Swifts were also present, so I’d assume they are staging in that area as well.  Lots of Gray Kingbirds on the powerlines all around that part of town.

       

      Charlie

       

      Charlie Ewell

      Cape Coral, FL

      anhinga42@...

      Cape Coral Friends of Wildlife info:

      http://www.ccfriendsofwildlife.org/

       

      Lee County Bird Patrol info:

      http://www.birdpatrol.org/

       

      FL Ornithological Society info:

      http://www.fosbirds.org/

       

       

       

      From: SWFLBirdline@yahoogroups.com [mailto:SWFLBirdline@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Bob
      Sent: Monday, July 25, 2011 9:19 PM
      To: SWFLBirdline@yahoogroups.com
      Subject: [SWFLBirdline] Caloosahatchee Creeks count

       

       

      I just went for a quick count after work this afternoon not expecting much. But as it often happens when I get out there something unexpected shows up.
      To start with there was a Red-tailed Hawk vocalizing from atop a power pole.
      Then just before the small bridge in a large oak I spotted a Red-eyed Vireo and a bright Black-and-white Warbler (the beginning of migration?)
      The list -- a little over an hour and a half of birding:
      Mottled Duck
      Tricolored Heron
      Black-crowned Night-Heron (juvenile)
      White Ibis
      Turkey Vulture
      Red-tailed Hawk
      Mourning Dove
      Common Ground-Dove
      Chimney Swift
      Red-bellied Woodpecker
      Downy Woodpecker
      Great Crested Flycatcher
      Red-eyed Vireo
      Blue Jay
      Blue-gray Gnatcatcher
      Northern Mockingbird
      Black-and-white Warbler
      Northern Cardinal
      Red-winged Blackbird
      Common Grackle

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