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High enrolment

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  • Rick Collins
    I have started several ARM groups and this is the highest enrolment for the first week I have ever seen. Most groups only reach this level after a month or
    Message 1 of 4 , Aug 13 6:45 AM
      I have started several ARM groups and this is the highest enrolment
      for the first week I have ever seen. Most groups only reach this
      level after a month or more.

      I see there are not many posts though. I guess with little SPEAR
      information being available, it is hard to have a question or comment.

      How about telling us why you are interested in the SPEAR devices? Do
      you have an application where the SPEAR would do the job better than
      anything else?
    • rtstofer
      ... comment. ... Maybe... Not having seen the datasheet it is hard to tell. I have been looking at maze solving robots. Specifically, I have been looking at
      Message 2 of 4 , Aug 14 12:22 AM
        --- In STMicroSPEAr@yahoogroups.com, "Rick Collins" <gnuarm@a...>
        wrote:
        > I have started several ARM groups and this is the highest enrolment
        > for the first week I have ever seen. Most groups only reach this
        > level after a month or more.
        >
        > I see there are not many posts though. I guess with little SPEAR
        > information being available, it is hard to have a question or
        comment.
        >
        > How about telling us why you are interested in the SPEAR devices? Do
        > you have an application where the SPEAR would do the job better than
        > anything else?

        Maybe... Not having seen the datasheet it is hard to tell. I have
        been looking at maze solving robots. Specifically, I have been
        looking at implementing the flood-fill algorithm in a number of ways.
        At first I tried the Atmel ATmega128 and it can solve for a single
        cell in 7 mS. I moved to the Philips LPC2106 and it can solve a cell
        in 1.6 mS. I also tried a rather naive FPGA design and it can solve
        the entire 256 cells in a few microseconds. Unfortunately, my first
        cut at the cell design required something around 1,000,000 gates.

        Frankly, the LPC2106 is probably what I'll use unless I change to a
        similar chip with an A/D converter. I really like the development
        environment for the Olimex prototype board.

        The other possibility: I am looking at doing a hexapod robot with 18
        servos and perhaps another couple for tilt/pan for the ultrasonic
        detector.

        I have a servo controller that will handle 21 servos and it connects
        over the I2C bus. I can run this from either the ATmega128 or the
        LPC2106 but in either situation, the processor is heavily involved in
        the I2C transfer. I designed an FPGA solution that looked like a
        register file of 32 position registers. Now the processor can just
        jam the value into a 16 bit register in a memory mapped area. Right
        now it is just an idea because adding a 300k gate FPGA doesn't seem
        practical. I need to revisit the 32 down counters and get rid of the
        subtractors.

        This would be a slick application for a hybrid device but the CPU
        itself needs to be high performance. Like running the LPC2106 with a
        60MHz internal clock and executing one instruction per clock.

        Again, I have no information about the device but it seemed quite
        interesting. But, it is one thing to develop a CPU/FPGA, it is
        another to have a FREE toolchain: IDE, compiler, linker, debugger,
        VHDL/Verilog synthesizer, etc. And, without the FREE toolchain the
        device doesn't mean a lot to me. We'll see...
      • Rick Collins
        ... a ... You need to check the link to the web site. There is a prelim sheet and the CPU runs at 192 MHz. This is an ARM9, not an ARM7 toy CPU. It has dual
        Message 3 of 4 , Aug 14 7:26 AM
          --- In STMicroSPEAr@yahoogroups.com, "rtstofer" <rstofer@p...> wrote:
          > This would be a slick application for a hybrid device but the CPU
          > itself needs to be high performance. Like running the LPC2106 with
          a
          > 60MHz internal clock and executing one instruction per clock.
          >
          > Again, I have no information about the device but it seemed quite
          > interesting. But, it is one thing to develop a CPU/FPGA, it is
          > another to have a FREE toolchain: IDE, compiler, linker, debugger,
          > VHDL/Verilog synthesizer, etc. And, without the FREE toolchain the
          > device doesn't mean a lot to me. We'll see...

          You need to check the link to the web site. There is a prelim sheet
          and the CPU runs at 192 MHz. This is an ARM9, not an ARM7 toy CPU.
          It has dual 8 kB caches as well as dual 8 kB on chip memories. So you
          can run your core code at full speed as well as having cache for the
          external memories.

          But I don't think the programmable logic is FPGA. It sounds like it
          is factory programmable only. I have sent them an email asking for
          more info, but so far I have not received a reply.

          Even if it is factory programmable only, if they make it practical to
          do small quantities, I can see it being widely used in products.
        • rtstofer
          ... you ... That is fast! I like it already. I am also using an Intel PXA255 but I am having a problem getting my brain up to speed. Currently it is running
          Message 4 of 4 , Aug 14 8:16 AM
            >
            > You need to check the link to the web site. There is a prelim sheet
            > and the CPU runs at 192 MHz. This is an ARM9, not an ARM7 toy CPU.
            > It has dual 8 kB caches as well as dual 8 kB on chip memories. So
            you
            > can run your core code at full speed as well as having cache for the
            > external memories.

            That is fast! I like it already. I am also using an Intel PXA255 but
            I am having a problem getting my brain up to speed. Currently it is
            running Linux which brings nothing to the party. Directly controlling
            IO is a PITA and the chip is probably far too complex to use as a
            microcontroller. But, it is FAST at 400 MHz.

            >
            > But I don't think the programmable logic is FPGA. It sounds like it
            > is factory programmable only. I have sent them an email asking for
            > more info, but so far I have not received a reply.
            >

            Definitely not useful to me.
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