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Re: Alimentary prohibitions in Christianity

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  • drthomas_joseph
    Dàvide - I am unaware of the rules you allude to. However, in Kerala (India) until about 75 years ago, it was customary at the beginning of the periods of
    Message 1 of 3 , May 17, 2004
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      Dàvide -

      I am unaware of the rules you allude to. However, in Kerala (India)
      until about 75 years ago, it was customary at the beginning of the
      periods of lent among the Syrian Orthodox to keep aside any vessels
      used in the cooking of non-vegetarian food and use special
      earthenware for lenten food preparation. I am not sure of the origins
      of the practice and whether such a custom was indigenous or
      originated from the church in the Near East.

      Thomas Joseph, Ph.D.
      Moderator, SOR-Forum


      --- In SOR-Forum@yahoogroups.com, Dàvide Sivèro <davidetamara@t...>
      wrote:
      > Dear brothers in Christ,
      > as you probably know Judaism has a set of rules about the
      absorption
      > of food into vessel and into other food which imply the prohibition
      > of eating permitted (kasher) food having absorbed either from
      > forbidden (taref) food or from something having absorbed from
      > forbidden food: for ex. kasher wet hot food, that touches an
      > earthenware plate that touched wet hot forbidden food, becomes
      > forbidden.
      > I suppose that such rules about absorption do not apply to the few
      > alimentary prohibitions of (Oriental Orthodox) Christianity (food
      > sacrificed to idols etc.), am I right?
      > Hoping that you can help me I thank you with all my heart.
      > May God reward and bless you.
      > BaMshi'ho,
      > Davide
    • Dàvide Sivèro
      Dear brother in Christ, I thank you with all my heart for your answer! In Judaism there is a set of rules which say when something (ex. a kitchen vessel)
      Message 2 of 3 , May 18, 2004
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        Dear brother in Christ, I thank you with all my heart for your
        answer!
        In Judaism there is a set of rules which say when something (ex. a
        kitchen vessel) absorbs "taref" (=which must not be eaten)
        substance. For ex. hot wet taref food istantaneously is absorbed
        into a vessel when it touches it, and "kasher" (=which can be eaten)
        food istantaneously becomes taref when it is wet, hot and touches a
        vessel having absorbed taref food. Taref substances having been
        absorbed by for ex. a kitchen vessel can sometimes been removed
        depending on what the vessel is made of: for ex. taref absorbed
        substance cannot be removed from earthenware vessels but can be
        removed from metal vessels by boiling them.
        It seems to me that such absorption rules do not apply to the few
        alimentary prohibitions of Christianity (ex. to vessel having
        touched hot wet idolatrous sacrifical meat; I also suspect
        that "Oriental" Orthodoxy forbids to eat blood as "Byzantine"
        Orthodoxy does...), am I right?
        Thank you all!!!
        BaMshi'ho,
        Davide
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