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Re: [SODZ] Re: growing hops

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  • Nick Meister
    Does anybody have extra rhizomes they are giving away? I have not tried homegrown before and wanted to get my hands dirty this spring. Thanks ... -- ... Nick
    Message 1 of 30 , Mar 1, 2011
    • 0 Attachment
      Does anybody have extra rhizomes they are giving away? I have not tried homegrown before and wanted to get my hands dirty this spring.

      Thanks

      On Tue, Feb 22, 2011 at 10:50 AM, Jim Sudduth <jms7465@...> wrote:
       

      Herb,
          Just wanted to clarify your comment on your harvest, (from 2 to about 8 ounces)?  Is that per plant/variety?  And would you say that amount because you leave a lot on the bines?
       
      Jim Sudduth



      From: brewref <doc@...>
      To: SODZ@yahoogroups.com
      Sent: Sat, February 19, 2011 10:59:35 AM
      Subject: [SODZ] Re: growing hops

       

      Hi All,

      Thanks for the interesting series of posts on growing hops.

      I've been growing hops in my Bexley garden for about 10 years. I've had the best luck growing Cascade, but Willamette also grow very well. I've also recently planted some Mt. Hood, but they're too new to tell if they're going to do well. Some growing seasons are better than others and the quality also varies depending on the weather.

      If you are new to growing hops, they behave like a lot of ground covers and many other perennials. That is, the first year they sleep, the second year they creep and the third year they leap. So, after three years, if they're in a place they like, they'll take off like weeds (well, they are weeds). I mention this for two reasons. First, if they like their place, they can choke out other plants. So, be careful planting hops near plants you want to keep. Second, (as one post already noted) the bines will grow on anything and everything. If you want to keep your varieties identifiable, keep them well separated. I grow Willamette on the back fence and Cascade on the side fence, about 20 yards apart so I can easily keep track of what I'm harvesting.

      I keep my plants thinned to about 3 plants of each variety and I only harvest the best, most perfect cones. I leave the rest on the bine. I don't usually use them all for brewing anyway, so I don't mind leaving some as decoration for the garden. I harvest anywhere from 2 to about 8 ounces depending on the year. Your mileage may vary.

      I've given away hop rhizomes to SODZ members in past years, and I'll let everybody know if I have any again this year - once the ground warms and I can see if I have to thin. If anyone has extra Kent Goldings, Styrian Goldings, other Noble or English variety, I'd love to get a rhizome. Thanks.

      Having fun with hops!
      Herb Bresler





      --
      ------
      --------------
      ----------------------

      Nick Meister
      meister614@...
    • Mikel
      I m also looking for some rhizomes. Please bring any rhizomes to the next meeting, if you would be so inclined. Thanks ahead of time, Mike (the fanatic Belgian
      Message 2 of 30 , Mar 1, 2011
      • 0 Attachment
        I'm also looking for some rhizomes. Please bring any rhizomes to the next meeting, if you would be so inclined. 

        Thanks ahead of time,
        Mike (the fanatic Belgian beer drinker/brewer)

        Sent from my iPod

        On Mar 1, 2011, at 16:41, Nick Meister <meister614@...> wrote:

         

        Does anybody have extra rhizomes they are giving away? I have not tried homegrown before and wanted to get my hands dirty this spring.


        Thanks

        On Tue, Feb 22, 2011 at 10:50 AM, Jim Sudduth <jms7465@...> wrote:
         

        Herb,
            Just wanted to clarify your comment on your harvest, (from 2 to about 8 ounces)?  Is that per plant/variety?  And would you say that amount because you leave a lot on the bines?
         
        Jim Sudduth



        From: brewref <doc@...>
        To: SODZ@yahoogroups.com
        Sent: Sat, February 19, 2011 10:59:35 AM
        Subject: [SODZ] Re: growing hops

         

        Hi All,

        Thanks for the interesting series of posts on growing hops.

        I've been growing hops in my Bexley garden for about 10 years. I've had the best luck growing Cascade, but Willamette also grow very well. I've also recently planted some Mt. Hood, but they're too new to tell if they're going to do well. Some growing seasons are better than others and the quality also varies depending on the weather.

        If you are new to growing hops, they behave like a lot of ground covers and many other perennials. That is, the first year they sleep, the second year they creep and the third year they leap. So, after three years, if they're in a place they like, they'll take off like weeds (well, they are weeds). I mention this for two reasons. First, if they like their place, they can choke out other plants. So, be careful planting hops near plants you want to keep. Second, (as one post already noted) the bines will grow on anything and everything. If you want to keep your varieties identifiable, keep them well separated. I grow Willamette on the back fence and Cascade on the side fence, about 20 yards apart so I can easily keep track of what I'm harvesting.

        I keep my plants thinned to about 3 plants of each variety and I only harvest the best, most perfect cones. I leave the rest on the bine. I don't usually use them all for brewing anyway, so I don't mind leaving some as decoration for the garden. I harvest anywhere from 2 to about 8 ounces depending on the year. Your mileage may vary.

        I've given away hop rhizomes to SODZ members in past years, and I'll let everybody know if I have any again this year - once the ground warms and I can see if I have to thin. If anyone has extra Kent Goldings, Styrian Goldings, other Noble or English variety, I'd love to get a rhizome. Thanks.

        Having fun with hops!
        Herb Bresler





        --
        ------
        --------------
        ----------------------

        Nick Meister
        meister614@...


      • Richard Sheppard
        I m going to have a Centennial root ball, going on its third year, sometime soon when I dig it up. ... -- Richard Sheppard richardlsheppard@gmail.com
        Message 3 of 30 , Mar 2, 2011
        • 0 Attachment
          I'm going to have a Centennial root ball, going on its third year, sometime soon when I dig it up.

          On Tue, Mar 1, 2011 at 8:38 PM, Mikel <mikel.cordts@...> wrote:
           

          I'm also looking for some rhizomes. Please bring any rhizomes to the next meeting, if you would be so inclined. 

          Thanks ahead of time,
          Mike (the fanatic Belgian beer drinker/brewer)

          Sent from my iPod

          On Mar 1, 2011, at 16:41, Nick Meister <meister614@...> wrote:

           

          Does anybody have extra rhizomes they are giving away? I have not tried homegrown before and wanted to get my hands dirty this spring.


          Thanks

          On Tue, Feb 22, 2011 at 10:50 AM, Jim Sudduth <jms7465@...> wrote:
           

          Herb,
              Just wanted to clarify your comment on your harvest, (from 2 to about 8 ounces)?  Is that per plant/variety?  And would you say that amount because you leave a lot on the bines?
           
          Jim Sudduth



          From: brewref <doc@...>
          To: SODZ@yahoogroups.com
          Sent: Sat, February 19, 2011 10:59:35 AM
          Subject: [SODZ] Re: growing hops

           

          Hi All,

          Thanks for the interesting series of posts on growing hops.

          I've been growing hops in my Bexley garden for about 10 years. I've had the best luck growing Cascade, but Willamette also grow very well. I've also recently planted some Mt. Hood, but they're too new to tell if they're going to do well. Some growing seasons are better than others and the quality also varies depending on the weather.

          If you are new to growing hops, they behave like a lot of ground covers and many other perennials. That is, the first year they sleep, the second year they creep and the third year they leap. So, after three years, if they're in a place they like, they'll take off like weeds (well, they are weeds). I mention this for two reasons. First, if they like their place, they can choke out other plants. So, be careful planting hops near plants you want to keep. Second, (as one post already noted) the bines will grow on anything and everything. If you want to keep your varieties identifiable, keep them well separated. I grow Willamette on the back fence and Cascade on the side fence, about 20 yards apart so I can easily keep track of what I'm harvesting.

          I keep my plants thinned to about 3 plants of each variety and I only harvest the best, most perfect cones. I leave the rest on the bine. I don't usually use them all for brewing anyway, so I don't mind leaving some as decoration for the garden. I harvest anywhere from 2 to about 8 ounces depending on the year. Your mileage may vary.

          I've given away hop rhizomes to SODZ members in past years, and I'll let everybody know if I have any again this year - once the ground warms and I can see if I have to thin. If anyone has extra Kent Goldings, Styrian Goldings, other Noble or English variety, I'd love to get a rhizome. Thanks.

          Having fun with hops!
          Herb Bresler





          --
          ------
          --------------
          ----------------------

          Nick Meister
          meister614@...





          --
          Richard Sheppard
          richardlsheppard@...

        • Kevin Potter
          All: The State of Ohio has kicked off an initiative called Common Sense Ohio which will review state regulations that stifle job creation.    I feel very
          Message 4 of 30 , Mar 6, 2011
          • 0 Attachment
            All:

            The State of Ohio has kicked off an initiative called Common Sense Ohio which will review state regulations that stifle job creation.   

            I feel very strongly that Ohio's liquor licenses fees are prejudiced against micro/craft brewers while basically giving wine makers free rein.  Therefore, I submitted the following comment to their website.  It is my understanding that they will be reviewing all of the submitted comments when looking for ways to support job creation in Ohio. 

            "Bring parity to Ohio's brewing and wine making fees to support the the current resurgence of micro and craft brewing. The craft brewing industry is a rapidly expanding across the nation and creating new businesses, thousands of jobs and generating millions in economic activity. However, Ohio law is biased against craft brewing and imposes excessive fees for brewing licenses.Ohio's A1 and A2 permit fees should be brought into parity so that Ohio can grow a craft beer industry as strong and prosperous as our wine industry. Current fees provide a disincentive to starting a brewery in Ohio.

            The following is the permit fees and descriptions provided by the Department of Liquor Control:

            A1 $3,906 ORC 4303.02 Manufacturer of beer, ale, stout and other malt liquors.
            A2 $76 ORC 4303.03 Manufacturer of wine. "

            If you share my believe that beer making and wine making permit fees should be similar, please take a few minutes to post a comment on the CSI Ohio website.  As with any grass roots lobbying effort, the more comments people post the more likely the message will be heard. 

            Thanks
            Kevin
             

            --- On Wed, 3/2/11, Richard Sheppard <richardlsheppard@...> wrote:

            From: Richard Sheppard <richardlsheppard@...>
            Subject: Re: [SODZ] Re: growing hops
            To: SODZ@yahoogroups.com
            Date: Wednesday, March 2, 2011, 8:09 AM

             

            I'm going to have a Centennial root ball, going on its third year, sometime soon when I dig it up.

            On Tue, Mar 1, 2011 at 8:38 PM, Mikel <mikel.cordts@...> wrote:
             

            I'm also looking for some rhizomes. Please bring any rhizomes to the next meeting, if you would be so inclined. 

            Thanks ahead of time,
            Mike (the fanatic Belgian beer drinker/brewer)

            Sent from my iPod

            On Mar 1, 2011, at 16:41, Nick Meister <meister614@...> wrote:

             

            Does anybody have extra rhizomes they are giving away? I have not tried homegrown before and wanted to get my hands dirty this spring.


            Thanks

            On Tue, Feb 22, 2011 at 10:50 AM, Jim Sudduth <jms7465@...> wrote:
             

            Herb,
                Just wanted to clarify your comment on your harvest, (from 2 to about 8 ounces)?  Is that per plant/variety?  And would you say that amount because you leave a lot on the bines?
             
            Jim Sudduth



            From: brewref <doc@...>
            To: SODZ@yahoogroups.com
            Sent: Sat, February 19, 2011 10:59:35 AM
            Subject: [SODZ] Re: growing hops

             

            Hi All,

            Thanks for the interesting series of posts on growing hops.

            I've been growing hops in my Bexley garden for about 10 years. I've had the best luck growing Cascade, but Willamette also grow very well. I've also recently planted some Mt. Hood, but they're too new to tell if they're going to do well. Some growing seasons are better than others and the quality also varies depending on the weather.

            If you are new to growing hops, they behave like a lot of ground covers and many other perennials. That is, the first year they sleep, the second year they creep and the third year they leap. So, after three years, if they're in a place they like, they'll take off like weeds (well, they are weeds). I mention this for two reasons. First, if they like their place, they can choke out other plants. So, be careful planting hops near plants you want to keep. Second, (as one post already noted) the bines will grow on anything and everything. If you want to keep your varieties identifiable, keep them well separated. I grow Willamette on the back fence and Cascade on the side fence, about 20 yards apart so I can easily keep track of what I'm harvesting.

            I keep my plants thinned to about 3 plants of each variety and I only harvest the best, most perfect cones. I leave the rest on the bine. I don't usually use them all for brewing anyway, so I don't mind leaving some as decoration for the garden. I harvest anywhere from 2 to about 8 ounces depending on the year. Your mileage may vary.

            I've given away hop rhizomes to SODZ members in past years, and I'll let everybody know if I have any again this year - once the ground warms and I can see if I have to thin. If anyone has extra Kent Goldings, Styrian Goldings, other Noble or English variety, I'd love to get a rhizome. Thanks.

            Having fun with hops!
            Herb Bresler





            --
            ------
            --------------
            ----------------------

            Nick Meister
            meister614@...





            --
            Richard Sheppard
            richardlsheppard@...


          • Van Brocklyn, James
            Kevin, Thanks for letting us know about this initiative. I posted a similar comment. Jim ________________________________ From: SODZ@yahoogroups.com
            Message 5 of 30 , Mar 6, 2011
            • 0 Attachment
              Kevin,
               
              Thanks for letting us know about this initiative.  I posted a similar comment.
               
              Jim
               
               

              From: SODZ@yahoogroups.com [SODZ@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Kevin Potter [kpotter1978@...]
              Sent: Sunday, March 06, 2011 11:12 AM
              To: SODZ@yahoogroups.com
              Subject: [SODZ] Ohio does the State of Ohio hate brewers but love winemakers?

               

              All:

              The State of Ohio has kicked off an initiative called Common Sense Ohio which will review state regulations that stifle job creation.   

              I feel very strongly that Ohio's liquor licenses fees are prejudiced against micro/craft brewers while basically giving wine makers free rein.  Therefore, I submitted the following comment to their website.  It is my understanding that they will be reviewing all of the submitted comments when looking for ways to support job creation in Ohio. 

              "Bring parity to Ohio's brewing and wine making fees to support the the current resurgence of micro and craft brewing. The craft brewing industry is a rapidly expanding across the nation and creating new businesses, thousands of jobs and generating millions in economic activity. However, Ohio law is biased against craft brewing and imposes excessive fees for brewing licenses. Ohio's A1 and A2 permit fees should be brought into parity so that Ohio can grow a craft beer industry as strong and prosperous as our wine industry. Current fees provide a disincentive to starting a brewery in Ohio.

              The following is the permit fees and descriptions provided by the Department of Liquor Control:

              A1 $3,906 ORC 4303.02 Manufacturer of beer, ale, stout and other malt liquors.
              A2 $76 ORC 4303.03 Manufacturer of wine. "

              If you share my believe that beer making and wine making permit fees should be similar, please take a few minutes to post a comment on the CSI Ohio website.  As with any grass roots lobbying effort, the more comments people post the more likely the message will be heard. 

              Thanks
              Kevin
               

              --- On Wed, 3/2/11, Richard Sheppard <richardlsheppard@...> wrote:

              From: Richard Sheppard <richardlsheppard@...>
              Subject: Re: [SODZ] Re: growing hops
              To: SODZ@yahoogroups.com
              Date: Wednesday, March 2, 2011, 8:09 AM

               

              I'm going to have a Centennial root ball, going on its third year, sometime soon when I dig it up.

              On Tue, Mar 1, 2011 at 8:38 PM, Mikel <mikel.cordts@...> wrote:
               

              I'm also looking for some rhizomes. Please bring any rhizomes to the next meeting, if you would be so inclined. 

              Thanks ahead of time,
              Mike (the fanatic Belgian beer drinker/brewer)

              Sent from my iPod

              On Mar 1, 2011, at 16:41, Nick Meister <meister614@...> wrote:

               

              Does anybody have extra rhizomes they are giving away? I have not tried homegrown before and wanted to get my hands dirty this spring.


              Thanks

              On Tue, Feb 22, 2011 at 10:50 AM, Jim Sudduth <jms7465@...> wrote:
               

              Herb,
                  Just wanted to clarify your comment on your harvest, (from 2 to about 8 ounces)?  Is that per plant/variety?  And would you say that amount because you leave a lot on the bines?
               
              Jim Sudduth



              From: brewref <doc@...>
              To: SODZ@yahoogroups.com
              Sent: Sat, February 19, 2011 10:59:35 AM
              Subject: [SODZ] Re: growing hops

               

              Hi All,

              Thanks for the interesting series of posts on growing hops.

              I've been growing hops in my Bexley garden for about 10 years. I've had the best luck growing Cascade, but Willamette also grow very well. I've also recently planted some Mt. Hood, but they're too new to tell if they're going to do well. Some growing seasons are better than others and the quality also varies depending on the weather.

              If you are new to growing hops, they behave like a lot of ground covers and many other perennials. That is, the first year they sleep, the second year they creep and the third year they leap. So, after three years, if they're in a place they like, they'll take off like weeds (well, they are weeds). I mention this for two reasons. First, if they like their place, they can choke out other plants. So, be careful planting hops near plants you want to keep. Second, (as one post already noted) the bines will grow on anything and everything. If you want to keep your varieties identifiable, keep them well separated. I grow Willamette on the back fence and Cascade on the side fence, about 20 yards apart so I can easily keep track of what I'm harvesting.

              I keep my plants thinned to about 3 plants of each variety and I only harvest the best, most perfect cones. I leave the rest on the bine. I don't usually use them all for brewing anyway, so I don't mind leaving some as decoration for the garden. I harvest anywhere from 2 to about 8 ounces depending on the year. Your mileage may vary.

              I've given away hop rhizomes to SODZ members in past years, and I'll let everybody know if I have any again this year - once the ground warms and I can see if I have to thin. If anyone has extra Kent Goldings, Styrian Goldings, other Noble or English variety, I'd love to get a rhizome. Thanks.

              Having fun with hops!
              Herb Bresler





              --
              ------
              --------------
              ----------------------

              Nick Meister
              meister614@...





              --
              Richard Sheppard
              richardlsheppard@...


            • frank.barbee
              Wow, I did not know that there was such a big difference in the costs for the two licenses. Thanks for bringing that to our attention so we can let our govt
              Message 6 of 30 , Mar 7, 2011
              • 0 Attachment

                Wow, I did not know that there was such a big difference in the costs for the two licenses.   Thanks for bringing that to our attention so we can let our govt know how we feel about it.

                 

                Frank Barbee

                 

                From: SODZ@yahoogroups.com [mailto:SODZ@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Kevin Potter
                Sent: Sunday, March 06, 2011 11:13 AM
                To: SODZ@yahoogroups.com
                Subject: [SODZ] Ohio does the State of Ohio hate brewers but love winemakers?

                 

                 

                All:

                The State of Ohio has kicked off an initiative called Common Sense Ohio which will review state regulations that stifle job creation.   

                I feel very strongly that Ohio's liquor licenses fees are prejudiced against micro/craft brewers while basically giving wine makers free rein.  Therefore, I submitted the following comment to their website.  It is my understanding that they will be reviewing all of the submitted comments when looking for ways to support job creation in Ohio. 

                "Bring parity to Ohio's brewing and wine making fees to support the the current resurgence of micro and craft brewing. The craft brewing industry is a rapidly expanding across the nation and creating new businesses, thousands of jobs and generating millions in economic activity. However, Ohio law is biased against craft brewing and imposes excessive fees for brewing licenses. Ohio's A1 and A2 permit fees should be brought into parity so that Ohio can grow a craft beer industry as strong and prosperous as our wine industry. Current fees provide a disincentive to starting a brewery in Ohio.

                The following is the permit fees and descriptions provided by the Department of Liquor Control:

                A1 $3,906 ORC 4303.02 Manufacturer of beer, ale, stout and other malt liquors.
                A2 $76 ORC 4303.03 Manufacturer of wine. "

                If you share my believe that beer making and wine making permit fees should be similar, please take a few minutes to post a comment on the CSI Ohio website.  As with any grass roots lobbying effort, the more comments people post the more likely the message will be heard. 

                Thanks
                Kevin
                 

                --- On Wed, 3/2/11, Richard Sheppard <richardlsheppard@...> wrote:


                From: Richard Sheppard <richardlsheppard@...>
                Subject: Re: [SODZ] Re: growing hops
                To: SODZ@yahoogroups.com
                Date: Wednesday, March 2, 2011, 8:09 AM

                 

                I'm going to have a Centennial root ball, going on its third year, sometime soon when I dig it up.

                On Tue, Mar 1, 2011 at 8:38 PM, Mikel <mikel.cordts@...> wrote:

                 

                I'm also looking for some rhizomes. Please bring any rhizomes to the next meeting, if you would be so inclined. 

                 

                Thanks ahead of time,

                Mike (the fanatic Belgian beer drinker/brewer)

                Sent from my iPod


                On Mar 1, 2011, at 16:41, Nick Meister <meister614@...> wrote:

                 

                Does anybody have extra rhizomes they are giving away? I have not tried homegrown before and wanted to get my hands dirty this spring.

                 

                Thanks

                On Tue, Feb 22, 2011 at 10:50 AM, Jim Sudduth <jms7465@...> wrote:

                 

                Herb,
                    Just wanted to clarify your comment on your harvest, (from 2 to about 8 ounces)?  Is that per plant/variety?  And would you say that amount because you leave a lot on the bines?

                 

                Jim Sudduth

                 

                 


                From: brewref <doc@...>
                To: SODZ@yahoogroups.com
                Sent: Sat, February 19, 2011 10:59:35 AM
                Subject: [SODZ] Re: growing hops


                 

                Hi All,

                Thanks for the interesting series of posts on growing hops.

                I've been growing hops in my Bexley garden for about 10 years. I've had the best luck growing Cascade, but Willamette also grow very well. I've also recently planted some Mt. Hood, but they're too new to tell if they're going to do well. Some growing seasons are better than others and the quality also varies depending on the weather.

                If you are new to growing hops, they behave like a lot of ground covers and many other perennials. That is, the first year they sleep, the second year they creep and the third year they leap. So, after three years, if they're in a place they like, they'll take off like weeds (well, they are weeds). I mention this for two reasons. First, if they like their place, they can choke out other plants. So, be careful planting hops near plants you want to keep. Second, (as one post already noted) the bines will grow on anything and everything. If you want to keep your varieties identifiable, keep them well separated. I grow Willamette on the back fence and Cascade on the side fence, about 20 yards apart so I can easily keep track of what I'm harvesting.

                I keep my plants thinned to about 3 plants of each variety and I only harvest the best, most perfect cones. I leave the rest on the bine. I don't usually use them all for brewing anyway, so I don't mind leaving some as decoration for the garden. I harvest anywhere from 2 to about 8 ounces depending on the year. Your mileage may vary.

                I've given away hop rhizomes to SODZ members in past years, and I'll let everybody know if I have any again this year - once the ground warms and I can see if I have to thin. If anyone has extra Kent Goldings, Styrian Goldings, other Noble or English variety, I'd love to get a rhizome. Thanks.

                Having fun with hops!
                Herb Bresler

                 




                --
                ------
                --------------
                ----------------------

                Nick Meister
                meister614@...

                 




                --
                Richard Sheppard
                richardlsheppard@...

                 

              • spklump6
                Unfortunately, with the way the state government is running in the red these days, I can see them equalizing the pay scales by raising the fees for wine
                Message 7 of 30 , Mar 7, 2011
                • 0 Attachment
                  Unfortunately, with the way the state government is running in the red these days, I can see them "equalizing" the pay scales by raising the fees for wine producers!
                  Stephen

                  --- In SODZ@yahoogroups.com, "frank.barbee" <frank.barbee@...> wrote:
                  >
                  > Wow, I did not know that there was such a big difference in the costs for the two licenses. Thanks for bringing that to our attention so we can let our govt know how we feel about it.
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  > Frank Barbee
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  > From: SODZ@yahoogroups.com [mailto:SODZ@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Kevin Potter
                  > Sent: Sunday, March 06, 2011 11:13 AM
                  > To: SODZ@yahoogroups.com
                  > Subject: [SODZ] Ohio does the State of Ohio hate brewers but love winemakers?
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  > All:
                  >
                  > The State of Ohio has kicked off an initiative called Common Sense Ohio <http://governor.ohio.gov/Default.aspx?alias=governor.ohio.gov/csi> which will review state regulations that stifle job creation.
                  >
                  > I feel very strongly that Ohio's liquor licenses fees are prejudiced against micro/craft brewers while basically giving wine makers free rein. Therefore, I submitted the following comment to their website. It is my understanding that they will be reviewing all of the submitted comments when looking for ways to support job creation in Ohio.
                  >
                  > "Bring parity to Ohio's brewing and wine making fees to support the the current resurgence of micro and craft brewing. The craft brewing industry is a rapidly expanding across the nation and creating new businesses, thousands of jobs and generating millions in economic activity. However, Ohio law is biased against craft brewing and imposes excessive fees for brewing licenses. Ohio's A1 and A2 permit fees should be brought into parity so that Ohio can grow a craft beer industry as strong and prosperous as our wine industry. Current fees provide a disincentive to starting a brewery in Ohio.
                  >
                  > The following is the permit fees and descriptions provided by the Department of Liquor Control:
                  >
                  > A1 $3,906 ORC 4303.02 Manufacturer of beer, ale, stout and other malt liquors.
                  > A2 $76 ORC 4303.03 Manufacturer of wine. "
                  >
                  > If you share my believe that beer making and wine making permit fees should be similar, please take a few minutes to post a comment on the CSI Ohio website. As with any grass roots lobbying effort, the more comments people post the more likely the message will be heard.
                  >
                  > Thanks
                  > Kevin
                  >
                  >
                  > --- On Wed, 3/2/11, Richard Sheppard <richardlsheppard@...> wrote:
                  >
                  >
                  > From: Richard Sheppard <richardlsheppard@...>
                  > Subject: Re: [SODZ] Re: growing hops
                  > To: SODZ@yahoogroups.com
                  > Date: Wednesday, March 2, 2011, 8:09 AM
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  > I'm going to have a Centennial root ball, going on its third year, sometime soon when I dig it up.
                  >
                  > On Tue, Mar 1, 2011 at 8:38 PM, Mikel <mikel.cordts@...> wrote:
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  > I'm also looking for some rhizomes. Please bring any rhizomes to the next meeting, if you would be so inclined.
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  > Thanks ahead of time,
                  >
                  > Mike (the fanatic Belgian beer drinker/brewer)
                  >
                  > Sent from my iPod
                  >
                  >
                  > On Mar 1, 2011, at 16:41, Nick Meister <meister614@...> wrote:
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  > Does anybody have extra rhizomes they are giving away? I have not tried homegrown before and wanted to get my hands dirty this spring.
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  > Thanks
                  >
                  > On Tue, Feb 22, 2011 at 10:50 AM, Jim Sudduth <jms7465@...> wrote:
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  > Herb,
                  > Just wanted to clarify your comment on your harvest, (from 2 to about 8 ounces)? Is that per plant/variety? And would you say that amount because you leave a lot on the bines?
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  > Jim Sudduth
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  > _____
                  >
                  >
                  > From: brewref <doc@...>
                  > To: SODZ@yahoogroups.com
                  > Sent: Sat, February 19, 2011 10:59:35 AM
                  > Subject: [SODZ] Re: growing hops
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  > Hi All,
                  >
                  > Thanks for the interesting series of posts on growing hops.
                  >
                  > I've been growing hops in my Bexley garden for about 10 years. I've had the best luck growing Cascade, but Willamette also grow very well. I've also recently planted some Mt. Hood, but they're too new to tell if they're going to do well. Some growing seasons are better than others and the quality also varies depending on the weather.
                  >
                  > If you are new to growing hops, they behave like a lot of ground covers and many other perennials. That is, the first year they sleep, the second year they creep and the third year they leap. So, after three years, if they're in a place they like, they'll take off like weeds (well, they are weeds). I mention this for two reasons. First, if they like their place, they can choke out other plants. So, be careful planting hops near plants you want to keep. Second, (as one post already noted) the bines will grow on anything and everything. If you want to keep your varieties identifiable, keep them well separated. I grow Willamette on the back fence and Cascade on the side fence, about 20 yards apart so I can easily keep track of what I'm harvesting.
                  >
                  > I keep my plants thinned to about 3 plants of each variety and I only harvest the best, most perfect cones. I leave the rest on the bine. I don't usually use them all for brewing anyway, so I don't mind leaving some as decoration for the garden. I harvest anywhere from 2 to about 8 ounces depending on the year. Your mileage may vary.
                  >
                  > I've given away hop rhizomes to SODZ members in past years, and I'll let everybody know if I have any again this year - once the ground warms and I can see if I have to thin. If anyone has extra Kent Goldings, Styrian Goldings, other Noble or English variety, I'd love to get a rhizome. Thanks.
                  >
                  > Having fun with hops!
                  > Herb Bresler
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  > --
                  > ------
                  > --------------
                  > ----------------------
                  >
                  > Nick Meister
                  > meister614@...
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  > --
                  > Richard Sheppard
                  > richardlsheppard@...
                  >
                • brewref
                  The amount is per year, from one to three plants, only picking the best cones. So, I leave at least half on the bines. It also depends on the year. In a good
                  Message 8 of 30 , Mar 10, 2011
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                    The amount is per year, from one to three plants, only picking the best cones. So, I leave at least half on the bines. It also depends on the year. In a good year I get more. In an average year I get a little less. Some years I don't harvest at all if they don't look good.
                    -Herb

                    --- In SODZ@yahoogroups.com, Jim Sudduth <jms7465@...> wrote:
                    >
                    > Herb,
                    > Just wanted to clarify your comment on your harvest, (from 2 to about 8
                    > ounces)? Is that per plant/variety? And would you say that amount because you
                    > leave a lot on the bines?
                    >
                    > Jim Sudduth
                    >

                    I keep my plants thinned to about 3 plants of each variety and I only harvest the best, most perfect cones. I leave the rest on the bine. I don't usually use them all for brewing anyway, so I don't mind leaving some as decoration for the garden. I harvest anywhere from 2 to about 8 ounces depending on the year. Your mileage may vary.
                    >
                  • Craig Chakford
                    I m in! my comment: Counter-intuitive as it may at first seem, bring down the cost of malt beverage brewing licenses. The micro-brewing movement is a
                    Message 9 of 30 , Mar 15, 2011
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                      I'm in!

                      my comment:
                      Counter-intuitive as it may at first seem, bring down the cost of malt beverage brewing licenses.

                      The micro-brewing movement is a grassroots/small-business bonanza in many states.  The fact that in Ohio the A1 (beer) commercial license costs approximately 50 times what the generally higher alcohol content A2 (wine) license does, is frankly stifling this potential industry.

                      -Craig



                      On Sun, Mar 6, 2011 at 11:12 AM, Kevin Potter <kpotter1978@...> wrote:
                       

                      All:

                      The State of Ohio has kicked off an initiative called Common Sense Ohio which will review state regulations that stifle job creation.   

                      I feel very strongly that Ohio's liquor licenses fees are prejudiced against micro/craft brewers while basically giving wine makers free rein.  Therefore, I submitted the following comment to their website.  It is my understanding that they will be reviewing all of the submitted comments when looking for ways to support job creation in Ohio. 

                      "Bring parity to Ohio's brewing and wine making fees to support the the current resurgence of micro and craft brewing. The craft brewing industry is a rapidly expanding across the nation and creating new businesses, thousands of jobs and generating millions in economic activity. However, Ohio law is biased against craft brewing and imposes excessive fees for brewing licenses.Ohio's A1 and A2 permit fees should be brought into parity so that Ohio can grow a craft beer industry as strong and prosperous as our wine industry. Current fees provide a disincentive to starting a brewery in Ohio.

                      The following is the permit fees and descriptions provided by the Department of Liquor Control:

                      A1 $3,906 ORC 4303.02 Manufacturer of beer, ale, stout and other malt liquors.
                      A2 $76 ORC 4303.03 Manufacturer of wine. "

                      If you share my believe that beer making and wine making permit fees should be similar, please take a few minutes to post a comment on the CSI Ohio website.  As with any grass roots lobbying effort, the more comments people post the more likely the message will be heard. 

                      Thanks
                      Kevin
                       

                      --- On Wed, 3/2/11, Richard Sheppard <richardlsheppard@...> wrote:

                      From: Richard Sheppard <richardlsheppard@...>
                      Subject: Re: [SODZ] Re: growing hops
                      To: SODZ@yahoogroups.com
                      Date: Wednesday, March 2, 2011, 8:09 AM

                       

                      I'm going to have a Centennial root ball, going on its third year, sometime soon when I dig it up.

                      On Tue, Mar 1, 2011 at 8:38 PM, Mikel <mikel.cordts@...> wrote:
                       

                      I'm also looking for some rhizomes. Please bring any rhizomes to the next meeting, if you would be so inclined. 

                      Thanks ahead of time,
                      Mike (the fanatic Belgian beer drinker/brewer)

                      Sent from my iPod

                      On Mar 1, 2011, at 16:41, Nick Meister <meister614@...> wrote:

                       

                      Does anybody have extra rhizomes they are giving away? I have not tried homegrown before and wanted to get my hands dirty this spring.


                      Thanks

                      On Tue, Feb 22, 2011 at 10:50 AM, Jim Sudduth <jms7465@...> wrote:
                       

                      Herb,
                          Just wanted to clarify your comment on your harvest, (from 2 to about 8 ounces)?  Is that per plant/variety?  And would you say that amount because you leave a lot on the bines?
                       
                      Jim Sudduth



                      From: brewref <doc@...>
                      To: SODZ@yahoogroups.com
                      Sent: Sat, February 19, 2011 10:59:35 AM
                      Subject: [SODZ] Re: growing hops

                       

                      Hi All,

                      Thanks for the interesting series of posts on growing hops.

                      I've been growing hops in my Bexley garden for about 10 years. I've had the best luck growing Cascade, but Willamette also grow very well. I've also recently planted some Mt. Hood, but they're too new to tell if they're going to do well. Some growing seasons are better than others and the quality also varies depending on the weather.

                      If you are new to growing hops, they behave like a lot of ground covers and many other perennials. That is, the first year they sleep, the second year they creep and the third year they leap. So, after three years, if they're in a place they like, they'll take off like weeds (well, they are weeds). I mention this for two reasons. First, if they like their place, they can choke out other plants. So, be careful planting hops near plants you want to keep. Second, (as one post already noted) the bines will grow on anything and everything. If you want to keep your varieties identifiable, keep them well separated. I grow Willamette on the back fence and Cascade on the side fence, about 20 yards apart so I can easily keep track of what I'm harvesting.

                      I keep my plants thinned to about 3 plants of each variety and I only harvest the best, most perfect cones. I leave the rest on the bine. I don't usually use them all for brewing anyway, so I don't mind leaving some as decoration for the garden. I harvest anywhere from 2 to about 8 ounces depending on the year. Your mileage may vary.

                      I've given away hop rhizomes to SODZ members in past years, and I'll let everybody know if I have any again this year - once the ground warms and I can see if I have to thin. If anyone has extra Kent Goldings, Styrian Goldings, other Noble or English variety, I'd love to get a rhizome. Thanks.

                      Having fun with hops!
                      Herb Bresler





                      --
                      ------
                      --------------
                      ----------------------

                      Nick Meister
                      meister614@...





                      --
                      Richard Sheppard
                      richardlsheppard@...



                    • Eric Johnson
                      This from the Cleveland Craft Brew Community page on FB: · I need help from brewers please. My Mom has organic land in Ohio. If I was to start a
                      Message 10 of 30 , Feb 8, 2012
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                        This from the "Cleveland Craft Brew Community" page on FB:
                         

                        ·         I need help from brewers please. My Mom has organic land in Ohio. If I was to start a hops farm which ones would I grow? Where would I get them? Who would I contact to buy them?

                         
                        Any suggestions?
                         
                        EJ
                      • bgoldenbaum
                        Hey Eric, I bought my hop rhizomes from www.thymegarden.com a few years ago. I paid $4.95 each for Magnum rhizomes (12-17% alpha). Bought in March, planted in
                        Message 11 of 30 , Feb 8, 2012
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                          Hey Eric,

                          I bought my hop rhizomes from www.thymegarden.com a few years ago. I paid $4.95 each for Magnum rhizomes (12-17% alpha). Bought in March, planted in April, had hops end of August. The vines get better each year, producing better yields.
                          good luck!
                          Brian




                          --- In SODZ@yahoogroups.com, Eric Johnson <EWJohnsonEsq@...> wrote:
                          >
                          >
                          > This from the "Cleveland Craft Brew Community" page on FB:
                          >
                          > � I need help from brewers please. My Mom has organic land in Ohio. If I was to start a hops farm which ones would I grow? Where would I get them? Who would I contact to buy them?
                          >
                          > Any suggestions?
                          >
                          > EJ
                          >
                        • Richard Sheppard
                          There is a yahoo group around growing hops, might be worth checking out. http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Grow-Hops-OT/ ... -- Richard Sheppard
                          Message 12 of 30 , Feb 8, 2012
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                            There is a yahoo group around growing hops, might be worth checking out. 
                            http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Grow-Hops-OT/ 

                            On Wed, Feb 8, 2012 at 4:05 PM, bgoldenbaum <bgoldenbaum@...> wrote:
                             

                            Hey Eric,

                            I bought my hop rhizomes from www.thymegarden.com a few years ago. I paid $4.95 each for Magnum rhizomes (12-17% alpha). Bought in March, planted in April, had hops end of August. The vines get better each year, producing better yields.
                            good luck!
                            Brian




                            --- In SODZ@yahoogroups.com, Eric Johnson <EWJohnsonEsq@...> wrote:
                            >
                            >
                            > This from the "Cleveland Craft Brew Community" page on FB:
                            >
                            > � I need help from brewers please. My Mom has organic land in Ohio. If I was to start a hops farm which ones would I grow? Where would I get them? Who would I contact to buy them?
                            >
                            > Any suggestions?
                            >
                            > EJ
                            >




                            --
                            Richard Sheppard
                            richardlsheppard@...

                          • Groene, Stacy B (Stacy)
                            EJ, A couple of short but applicable threads about this on HomeBrewTalk.com: http://www.homebrewtalk.com/f92/commercial-hop-farming-66849/
                            Message 13 of 30 , Feb 8, 2012
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                              EJ,

                               

                              A couple of short but applicable threads about this on HomeBrewTalk.com:

                               

                              http://www.homebrewtalk.com/f92/commercial-hop-farming-66849/

                              http://www.homebrewtalk.com/f92/organic-hops-farming-75822/

                               

                              -Stacy

                            • thespiderwrangler
                              http://www.freshops.com/hop-growing/hop-gardening
                              Message 14 of 30 , Feb 8, 2012
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