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Perunal Srusrusha

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  • Vineeth John Abraham
    Last week there was a discussion regarding Perunal Srusrusha Kremam . Someone was telling its translated by IOC and why are we using the same? But let me ask
    Message 1 of 4 , Dec 24, 2012
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      Last week there was a discussion regarding "Perunal Srusrusha Kremam". Someone was telling its translated by IOC and why are we using the same? But let me ask something else. 

      How many of the Altar Boys / Rev. Dn's know the tunes of those Songs?

      Yesterday for Christmas Srusrusha i went to a chapel (Pampady) and there were couple of Altar boys and a Dn. who are serving in Holy Altar for more than 10+ years. But none know any of the songs. I remember once I asked one of our Priest in our church before a month of Christmas to assemble Altar boys after Holy Qurbana and practice the songs. He told there is no need for the same and somehow we will manage. 

      Our church tradition says our Prayer comprised of different sections. 

      1. Kauma (Prayer)
      2. Songs
      3. Reading
      4. Sermon
      5. Holy Qurbana


      We should have Kooryo's who read and sing beautifully. Priest should deliver Sermon on  daily readings at church. 
      These days we discuss a lot about Church and Tradition but we never put them into practice. 

      Any suggestions on improving the same? 
       
      +Vineeth John Abraham
      4187
    • dhinuus
      Dear Vineeth, I have a humble suggestion on improving this. First of all in our Syriac Orthodox Worship hymns we are only allowed to chant and not use any kind
      Message 2 of 4 , Dec 26, 2012
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        Dear Vineeth,

        I have a humble suggestion on improving this.

        First of all in our Syriac Orthodox Worship hymns we are only allowed to chant and not use any kind of musical instruments. But is that what is happening now a days; we have very loud beats blasting out from an electronic key board. Sometimes when you hear the beats you are not sure if the song is going to be the latest Bollywood or Malluwood song. The unfortunate thing is that this happens in divine liturgies where even our Bishops and Catholicose is the chief celebrant and they dont say a word. I wonder; is it because they don't care or is it because they don't have the courage to admonish.

        Second, at the initiative of the MSOT Seminary at Udayagiri or some other Dyara all the liturgical hymns should be recorded in its true tones; without any beats or musical insturments. These hymns should then be made available on the web for anyone to download and use freely. The church should even consider starting a formal Youtube channel and upload these hymns sung in the proper tune without any musical instruments to that formal channel. Then these hymns online will be a good reference material for altar boys, deacons, choir leaders and lay men.

        These are just my thoughts..

        Mathew G M
        0929
      • drthomas_joseph
        Vineeth - I have witnessed clergy and altar boys in many parishes struggling with Christmas services. The canonical hours and the order of yaldo (from
        Message 3 of 4 , Jan 1, 2013
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          Vineeth -

          I have witnessed clergy and altar boys in many parishes struggling with Christmas services. The canonical hours and the order of yaldo (from Ma`de`dono, The Book of Feasts) have numerous hymns which are set to melodies in the Beth Gazo (Ekkara) unfamiliar to the current generation in Malankara. Without preparation, improvisation on the fly becomes necessary often with very unpleasant results.

          In the Syriac Orthodox Churches of the Middle East, those who serve at the altar have to learn the essentials before being admitted to the altar. They are usually not altar boys, but ordained to an order of deaconate. The first order of deaconate is 'mzamrono' - literally, the 'singer' - before being ordained they would have learnt the essential melodies of the Beth Gazo. In our monasteries in Europe, it is common to see large groups of young boys staying at the monastery especially over school breaks, undergoing training in the Syriac language, scripture, musical traditions, and in assisting liturgical services. They are only ordained after basic training.

          We have to require similar training for those who serve at the altar and in the church choirs - but many obstacles stand in the way of mobilizing such training. However, we do have the ability to use the internet and technologies to at least provide the resources for those who care to learn.

          Many of us have lamented about the indiscriminate adoption of secular music in our liturgical services in this forum and elsewhere; however, it seems to get worse over time. As you rightly state, we hear a lot of street proclamations of upholding traditions, but what we really see is indifference at all levels.

          And the fallout of all this is not mere loss of traditional forms of worship; in many parishes, you find the congregation being mute spectators unable to or conditioned not to participate in liturgical services which are conducted according to the whims and fancies of a few. In this disengagement of the faithful from liturgical worship lies a formidable challenge for the Church.

          Thomas Joseph, Ph.D.
          ID: 0202


          --- In SOCM-FORUM@yahoogroups.com, Vineeth John Abraham <vineethjohnabraham@...> wrote:
          >
          > Last week there was a discussion regarding "Perunal Srusrusha Kremam". Someone was telling its translated by IOC and why are we using the same? But let me ask something else. 
          >
          > How many of the Altar Boys / Rev. Dn's know the tunes of those Songs?
          >
        • Sony
          I completely agree with Dr. Thomas. A few humble suggestions are: Internet recordings - The Holy Church should take efforts to make available the different
          Message 4 of 4 , Jan 8, 2013
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            I completely agree with Dr. Thomas. A few humble suggestions are:

            Internet recordings - The Holy Church should take efforts to make available the different songs/tunes of the perunnal susrusha kramam on the internet and inform parish churches of the same. Many parishes are not even aware of the extended Beth Gazo recordings by L.L. Partiarch Mor Ignatius Yacub III. Eventhough these tunes slightly differ from the tunes used in Malankara, they are still valid. Also efforts should be undertaken to have a Malankara version of the Beth Gazo recordings.

            Deacon Rotation - Due to lack of deacons, it would be ideal that a certain number of deacons who are well versed with the Ekkara/Beth Gazo visit parishes on a rotational basis to train the choir and altar boys on the perunnal susrusha kramam. A humble suggestion is that this should be enforced by the respective diocesan metropolitans.

            Regards,
            Sony John George
            1025

            --- In SOCM-FORUM@yahoogroups.com, "drthomas_joseph" wrote:
            >
            > Vineeth -
            >
            > I have witnessed clergy and altar boys in many parishes struggling with Christmas services. The canonical hours and the order of yaldo (from Ma`de`dono, The Book of Feasts) have numerous hymns which are set to melodies in the Beth Gazo (Ekkara) unfamiliar to the current generation in Malankara. Without preparation, improvisation on the fly becomes necessary often with very unpleasant results.
            >
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